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Abstract

Runtime verification (RV) provides essential mechanisms to enhance software robustness and prevent malfunction. However, RV often entails complex and formal processes that could be avoided in scenarios in which only invariants or simple safety properties are verified, for example, when verifying input data in Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). This paper describes S-DAVER, a lightweight framework aimed at supporting separate data verification in GUIs. All the verification processes are encapsulated in an independent layer and then transparently integrated into an application. The verification rules are specified in separate files and written in interpreted languages to be changed/reloaded at runtime without recompilation. Superimposed visual feedback is used to assist developers during the testing stage and to improve the experience of users during execution. S-DAVER provides a lightweight, easy-to-integrate and dynamic verification framework for GUI data. It is an integral part of the development, testing and execution stages. An implementation of S-DAVER was successfully integrated into existing open-source applications, with promising results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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... Although their relationship with software cybernetics has not been explicitly determined, these researches have already benefited from the use of the concepts in software cybernetics. For example, in Navarro et al. (2015), superimposed visual feedback is used to help complete the verification; in the thought of incremental verification, the former results would affect the following process, which is an idea of control mechanism. These researches have provided a basis for our work to apply software cybernetics to software verification. ...
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Methodological guidelines for object-oriented software construction that improve the reliability of the resulting software systems are presented. It is shown that the object-oriented techniques rely on the theory of design by contract, which underlies the design of the Eiffel analysis, design, and programming language and of the supporting libraries, from which a number of examples are drawn. The theory of contract design and the role of assertions in that theory are discussed.< >
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This paper addresses those questions for the class of enforcement mechanisms that work by monitoring execution steps of some system, herein called the target, and terminating the target's execution if it is about to violate the security policy being enforced. We call this class EM, for Execution Monitoring. EM includes security kernels, reference monitors, firewalls, and most other operating system and hardware -based enforcement mechanisms that have appeared in the literature. Our targets may be objects, modules, processes, subsystems, or entire systems; the execution steps monitored may range from fine-grained actions (such as memory accesses) to higher-level operations (such as method calls) to operations that change the security-configuration and thus restrict subsequent execution
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