Article

Speaking of Pianists

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... One example of this is the extremely slow practice of virtuoso pianist Sergei Rachmaninov. His student Abram Chasins described this practice as lowering the tempo so drastically as to render the music unrecognizable, and attributed this strategy to Rachmaninov's dedication to precision and perfection (Chasins, 1961). In music research, little is known about the many possible ways musicians use slow practice, although some studies have touched upon the topic. ...
Article
Full-text available
Practicing slowly is an intuitive and prevalent learning strategy among instrumental musicians. Nevertheless, little is known about the psychological mechanisms of slow practice, or how rehearsing slow movements may support the performance of fast-tempo playing. This study investigated the prevalence and possible functions of slow practice strategies. A total of 256 adult instrumental musicians provided self-report ratings about slow practice and tempo-management strategy use, musical background information, and the Musical Self-regulated Learning Questionnaire in an online survey. Results indicate that practicing slowly is an extremely common technique among classical (99.45%) and non-classical (89.12%) musicians of varying expertise, supporting both technical and expressive goals, with technical more frequently reported. Principal components analysis identified three types of slow practice as serving expressive, technical, or preparatory functions. Expressive Slow Practice and Technical Slow Practice were positively associated with self-regulated learning, but not expertise across both music genre groups. Preparatory Slow Practice was positively associated with self-regulated learning and expertise in classical musicians, while in non-classical musicians, it had no association with self-regulation and a negative association with expertise. These findings provide groundwork for further research exploring causal effects of slow practice and tempo-management strategies on learning and development of self-regulated learning in various music genre cultures.
... Music education has a long tradition for learning through apprenticeship, for learners are taught by an expert or an expert performer, often in a master-apprentice relationship (Hays et al., 2000). Music studying is always studied on a one-to-one basis in a music studio (Chasins, 2020;Small, 1996). ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Extensive research has demonstrated that teacher emotional support has a significant positive impact on students engagement and academic achievement. Compared with students studying other majors, music students have a separate tutor who is under a profound influence on the individual students during the undergraduate level. The aim of this study is to investigate in which self-efficacy and career optimism of music students is impacted by teacher emotional support. The research questions are: 1) Does the emotional support of professional tutors has a positive impact on the self-efficacy and career optimism of music students? 2) How exactly does this influence happens? 3) What kind of emotional support do music students need? Participants were 360 music students majoring in music performance and music education from several regions in China, who had internship experience in related fields (e.g. private teachers, schools or orchestras), completed a set of questionnaires that included Teacher Emotional Support Scale, Self-Efficacy Formative Questionnaire, and the career optimism section of the Career Future Inventory (CFI). Based on the results of the questionnaire, three students with strong teacher emotional support and three who were weak were selected to conduct structured interviews to gain insight into the specific impact of teacher emotional support on self-efficacy and career optimism of music students. The results show that teacher emotional support has a significant positive influence on music students’ self-efficacy and career optimism, which plays a mediating role between self-efficacy and career optimism. Among teachers emotional support for music students, the academic support for students is particularly important. Teacher emotional support has a significant positive impact on the academic self-efficacy and personal career development optimism of music students. Therefore, teachers’ emotional care for music students could be emphasized. Appropriately changing educational concepts, encouraging students more and respecting students’ personal development choices are conducive to improving music students self-efficacy and helping them maintain an optimistic attitude towards future career development.
... The focus ideally should be on 'producing rounded musicians showing a high level of instrumental competence, a depth of musical understanding and a core of personal confidence that will allow them to express themselves with total commitment in any performing area' (Presland, 2005). Many of the great performers and teachers of today and in the past have had mentor figures in their lives, and interestingly, applied music training today is still mostly taught on a one-to-one basis (Chasins, 1988). It is also interesting to note that the other most notable example of one-to-one training in education today is the higher degree research student undertaking postgraduate studies with the guidance of an experienced professor. ...
Data
Full-text available
... Many of the great performers and teachers of today and in the past have had mentor figures in their lives, and interestingly, applied music training today is still mostly taught on a one-to-one basis (Chasins, 1988). It is also interesting to note that the other most notable example of one-to-one training in education today is the higher degree research student undertaking postgraduate studies with the guidance of an experienced professor. ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the nature of mentor relationships in the training of musicians. The study focuses on the life experiences of university faculty staff actively involved in the training of professional musicians and specifically focuses on the functions and meaning of the experience from the perspective of a person having been mentored and now i n their role of mentoring others . The study uses a qualitative framework to describe the constru ction and meaning of the rela tion ship for musicians from the participants’ life experiences of having been mentored and now as educators in the role of mentorin g others . The findings identify the key functions of mentorship as per the psychosocial and career development of the protégé , and the meaning of the experience from a protégé and mentor perspective . The study highlight s the developmental and sociological importance of the relationship and the need for institutions and music faculty staff to fully understand the scope and function of the role in the training of professional training.
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the study is to provide a brief introduction to the cultural history of the personality psychological based findings of the musical profession. As we can see, in the different historical areas very wide variety of views appeared, until in the second half of 20th century music psychology, as an evdience based empirical discipline formalised these naive theories. The most important findings were that the personality structure of musicians is fundamentally differs from the normal population (1); and the constantly reported higher level of anxiety-related traits in the case of musicians (2). The latter finding highlights the importance of teaching different techniques of mental hygienical interventions during the music teacher training courses in order to avoid psychopathological symptomatisation and the short-term burn-out of career entrant teachers.
Article
How do singers approach teaching and learning in the context of performance studies in higher education? And how is their approach distinct from that taken by instrumentalists in the same context? This paper focuses largely on verbal dialogue recorded in 67 instrumental and vocal lessons, in the music department of a UK university. It examines the approach taken by singing teachers to technique and interpretation as areas of study, focusing on features that distinguish them from instrumental teachers. The analysis of dialogue suggests that singers place more emphasis on technique, and less on interpretation, than do instrumental teachers, and that they also employ affective language and metaphor, appealing to the student's imagination, more. Interviews with participants help to cast some light on a discussion of reasons for and implications of these differences.
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the importance of mentor relationships in the training of musicians. Using in-depth interviews with professional musicians, the study describes the construction and meaning of mentorships in the training of musicians and shows mentorship to be meaningful for both the mentor and the protégé. It identifies key functions relating to both the psychosocial and career development of the protégé. Results highlight the need for music teachers and music administrators to be more aware of the developmental importance of the mentor relationships in their teaching.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.