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Coming Clean: Overcoming Addiction without Treatment

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Despite the widely accepted view that formal treatment and twelve-step groups are essential for overcoming dependencies on alcohol and drugs, each year large numbers of former addicts quietly recover on their own, without any formal treatment or participation in self-help groups at all. Coming Clean explores the untold stories of untreated addicts who have recovered from a lifestyle of excessive and compulsive substance use without professional assistance. Based on 46 in-depth interviews with formerly addicted individuals, this controversial volume examines their reasons for avoiding treatment, the strategies they employed to break away from their dependencies, the circumstances that facilitated untreated recovery, and the implications of recovery without treatment for treatment professionals as well as for prevention and drug policy. Because of the pervasive belief that addiction is a disease requiring formal intervention, few training programs for physicians, social workers, psychologists, and other health professionals explore the phenomenon of natural recovery from addiction. Coming Clean offers insights for treatment professionals of how recovery without treatment can work and how candidates for this approach can be identified. A detailed appendix outlines specific strategies which will be of interest to addicted individuals themselves who wish to attempt the process of recovery without treatment.
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Coming Clean: Overcoming Addiction without Treatment
Irvine, Leslie
Contemporary Sociology; Jan 2001; 30, 1; ProQuest Central
pg. 86
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
... The study of eating disorders is bracketed by the stigma associated with mental illness [23]. Individuals with mental illnesses often have an arduous time constructing recovery identities because of marginalization and deleterious stereotypes [6,11,12,24,25,39,59,64]. Howard explained how recovery identities become an end-inthemselves, and how that limits an individual's ability to recover [32]. ...
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