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Speaking the Language of Love: On Whether Chapman's (1992) Claims Stand Up to Empirical Testing

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This paper explores and tests the claims made by Chapman (1992) in his popular press book, The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to your Mate. One of Chapman's fundamental claims is that couples where partners receive their respective preferred love languages experience higher quality relationships than couples who do not. Couples (N = 83) reported their preferences for and tendencies to demonstrate Chapman's five love languages. They also completed measures of relational quality. Descriptive results revealed different potential couple combinations in terms of feeling and giving preferred love languages, and suggest that few couples meet Chapman's criteria for high relational quality. After collapsing couple combinations to reflect matched, mismatched, or partially matched couples (in terms of feeling and giving their love language preferences), a significant result surfaced regarding assessments of relational quality. More specifically, matched and mismatched couples' reports of relational quality exhibited less discrepancy than partially matched couples. Other results from tests of ANOVA and MANOVA provided little empirical support for Chapman's notions of love languages.
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The Open Communication Journal, 2013, 7, 1-11 1
1874-916X/13 2013 Bentham Open
Open Access
Speaking the Language of Love: On Whether Chapman’s (1992) Claims
Stand Up to Empirical Testing
Denise M. Polk* and Nichole Egbert
Main Hall, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383, USA
Abstract: This paper explores and tests the claims made by Chapman (1992) in his popular press book, The Five Love
Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to your Mate. One of Chapman’s fundamental claims is that couples
where partners receive their respective preferred love languages experience higher quality relationships than couples who
do not. Couples (N = 83) reported their preferences for and tendencies to demonstrate Chapman’s five love languages.
They also completed measures of relational quality. Descriptive results revealed different potential couple combinations in
terms of feeling and giving preferred love languages, and suggest that few couples meet Chapman’s criteria for high
relational quality. After collapsing couple combinations to reflect matched, mismatched, or p artially matched couples (in
terms of feeling and giving their love language preferences), a significant result surfaced regarding assessments of
relational quality. More specifically, matched and mismatched couples’ reports of relational quality exhibited less
discrepancy th an partially matched couples. Other results from tests of ANOVA and MANOVA provided little empirical
support for Chapman’s notions of love languages.
Keywords: Love languages, relational quality, affection, romantic couples.
INTRODUCTION
“He sends you flowers when what you really want is time
to talk… The problem isn’t your love it’s your love
language” (Chapman, 1992, back cover). In his best-selling
book, “The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt
Commitment to Your Mate,” Dr. Gary Chapman promoted a
theory that has gained widespread public approval. For
example, the government of Singapore and the Chaplain’s
Office of NATO invited him to speak, and the book has been
a perennial New York Times Bestseller, selling over seven
million copies (Marriage & Family Life Consultants).
Chapman’s main thesis is that there are five emotional love
languages (LLs) ways that people “speak” and understand
emotional love. Despite the fact that the number of ways to
express love through LLs is essentially limitless, people
must learn to “speak” the LL of their partner because
relational satisfaction hinges on filling a partner’s
metaphorical emotional “love tank” (Chapman, 1992).
Academic researchers often criticize popular books as
oversimplifying complex ideas, but Chapman’s (1992)
claims parallel some relational scholarship. For example,
Egbert and Polk (2006) found the LLs formed five distinct
factors, and they found significant relationships between
several relational maintenance factors and LLs. Therefore,
one goal of this project is to test the foundation of
Chapman’s claims through empirical investigation.
Specifically, we tested Chapman’s thesis that couples where
partners tend to give love in ways that aligns with their
*Address correspondence to this author at the Main Hall, West Chester
University, West Chester, PA 19383, USA; Tel: 610-436-2658;
Fax: 610-436-3046; Emails: dpolk@wcupa.edu
partners’ preferred LLs actually enjoy higher quality
relationships.
CHAPMAN’S FIVE LOVE LANGUAGES
Empirical support for Chapman’s (1992) book is
mixed when compared with communication scholarship.
Chapman’s (1992) basic claim about the fundamental need
for love and affection is well-documented empirically
(Floyd, 2006; Floyd, Hesse, & Haynes, 2007; Schutz, 1958),
affecting well-being (Downs & Javidi, 1990) and affecting
different types of relationships (e.g., Floyd & Morman,
2003; Schrodt, Ledbetter, & Ohrt, 2007). It also plays a
significant role in relational maintenance (Bell & Healey,
1992) and quality (Floyd & Morman, 1998). In fact, Floyd
(2006) claimed that humans need to be shown they are
loved, and other researchers have documented ways people
accomplish this expression (Villard & Whipple, 1976).
Several theories can be used to predict and/or explain
affectionate behaviors. For example, Floyd (2006) reviewed
theories used to frame studies of affectionate behavior, and
included Thibaut and Kelley’s (1959) interdependence
theory, expectancy violations theory (Burgoon, 1978), and
interaction adaptation theory (Burgoon, Dillman, & Stern,
1993). Floyd’s review explained how affection exchange
theory (Floyd, 2001) addresses the existing theories’
inability to predict or explain affectionate communication.
According to Chapman (1992), no emotional need is
more basic than the need for love and affection, and people
express love according to five LLs: words of affirmation
(encouraging and affectionate messages), quality time (spent
together relating or in shared activities), gifts (thoughtful
tokens), acts of service (help with tasks), and physical touch
2 The Open Communicatio n Journal, 2013, Volume 7 Polk and Egbert
(hand-holding to sexual intercourse). Although Chapman
uses the term “speak,” four of these LLs largely are
nonverbal; however, despite the word choice, the five LLs
include behaviors that fall under the scope of what Floyd and
Morman (1998) named a tripartite model of affectionate
behavior (verbal, nonverbal, and supportive behaviors).
The first part of Chapman’s (1992) thesis is that people
tend to have a distinct preference for a specific LL. Chapman
claimed that, often, people will instantly know their own LL
after hearing it described. Similarly, Hazan and Shaver
(1994) successfully tested adult romantic attachment by
collapsing scale items into forced-choice items; yet, more
recently, researchers advocate using continuous measures
(e.g., Feeney, 2008). Employing Egbert and Polk’s (2006)
validated 20-item Love Language Scale (LLS; four items for
each dimension), our first goal was to compare forced-choice
measurement with the 20-item scale using continuous scores.
Therefore, we asked:
RQ1: Does a relationship exist between a partner’s
forced-choice feel love language and the means associated
with their own feel Love Language Scale subscores?
In the second part of his thesis, Chapman (1992) added
that when partners speak each other’s primary LL, their need
for love will be satisfied, resulting in high relational quality;
however, when they do not, their love tank will drain. He
suggests that receiving a singular preferred LL is more
important for keeping the tank full than receiving a
combination of all five. Yet, empirical data from other
researchers suggests otherwise. For example, social support
literature suggests that support functions differentially and
impacts outcomes based on contextual needs (Cutrona &
Suhr, 1990, 1992). Johnson (2001) suggested that the more
behaviors practiced, the greater the relational satisfaction,
and Leverett (2007) claimed that the relationship between
maintenance and satisfaction may be dependent on quantity
and quality of behaviors.
According to Chapman (1992), couples often have
different LL preferences. This can pose problems because
most people automatically give their own preferred LL
regardless of their partner’s LL preference (Chapman, 1992).
Therefore, a key to high relational quality is to recognize a
partner’s preference and to engage in behaviors that
communicate that particular LL. This claim has been
supported empirically. For example, Floyd (2006) found that
“although affectionate behaviors may carry some inherent
positivity, their valence is also determined by the extent to
which they are congruent with a recipient’s desires” (p. 86).
Thus, people may give the LL they prefer to receive, hoping
it will be reciprocated. However, Floyd (2006) claimed that
people often compensate when they receive affection
incongruent with their desires, or they ignore/fail to perceive
the behavior as affectionate. Chapman echoed these ideas,
claiming that mismatches occur when one partner fails to
recognize and respond appropriately to a partner’s LL. Floyd
(2006) also addressed this issue, arguing that ignoring
affection behaviorally often indicates the recipient is
uncertain as to how to respond. Of course, if both people
desire the same LL, then it is likely that partners tend to
reciprocate that LL increasingly over time, leading to higher
relational quality. Using Floyd’s (2006) language of
affectionate behavior, then, Chapman’s thesis hinges on the
idea that when people’s LLs are different, they should
compensate for those differences by actively choosing
behaviors that reflect the other person’s desired LL.
On the other hand, Chapman’s (1992) ideas diverge from
some scholars about the frequency of affectionate behaviors.
For example, Villard and Whipple (1976) contended that
people ascribe more value to rarely-used currencies, value
frequently used currencies less, and that unused currencies
possess no value. Dainton (2000) found that people expect
partners to perform all types of relational maintenance
behaviors. According to Chapman, however, the frequent
expression of a partner’s LL is the best contribution to
relational quality, and although Chapman agrees that
partners must exchange desired LLs over the long term, he
does not advance that LLs can be equally valued beyond one
(or sometimes two) favorite/s.
Furthermore, people differ regarding their expression and
receipt of affectionate communication (Floyd, 2003, 2006;
Floyd, et al., 2005). Floyd (2006) outlined a range of optimal
tolerance for affection that considers both need and desire, as
well as upper and lower thresholds. These thresholds both
can be problematic in different ways (Floyd, 2006). This is
very different from Chapman’s (1992) claim that only the
failure to receive one’s minimum threshold is problematic.
He does not address the possibility that people potentially
could receive too much affection. To understand people’s
tendency to enact the LL behaviors that they prefer to
receive rather than the LL behaviors their partner prefers, to
receive we ask:
RQ2: Does a relationship exist between a partner’s
forced-choice feel love language preference with their
partner’s tendency to give Love Language Scale subscores?
Chapman (1992) argues that the key to relational quality
is more than recognizing a partner’s LL by learning how to
enact behaviors that demonstrate the LL. He maintains that
people must consciously prioritize a partner’s needs to
enhance relational quality, but does not offer empirical
evidence for his claims, nor does he discuss situations where
both partners receiving their desired LL, only one partner
receiving his or her desired LL, or neither receiving desired
LLs. This information can be obtained by categorizing each
couple based on the LL preferences they report
feeling/preferring and giving. Once all the types have been
identified, they can be collapsed to represent matches (both
report giving each other’s preferred LL), partial matches
(only one reports giving the other’s preferred LL), and
mismatches (neither person reports giving their partner’s
preferred LL). Therefore, the following question provides a
basis for exploring these claims:
RQ3: What are the most common couple types given the
different potential LL configurations?
Moving forward to examine Chapman’s claims about
relational satisfaction, evidence from empirical scholarship
is largely supportive. Burleson and Denton (1992) predicted
that a couple’s similarity in social skill impacts marital
satisfaction. Burleson, Kunkel, and Birch (1994) found that
although similarity in communication did not impact
whether people dated each other, it contributed to their
relational satisfaction and partner attraction. A basic idea
behind interdependence theory (Thibaut & Kelley, 1959) is
Love Languages The Open Communication Journal, 2013, Volume 7 3
that as couples become more deeply involved, they become
more dependent upon their relationship. This dependence is
linked with satisfaction and commitment. More importantly,
the greater their satisfaction and commitment, the more
likely they are to use pro-relationship behaviors (i.e.,
relational maintenance) to preserve and maintain that
satisfaction and commitment (Rusbult, Olsen, Davis, &
Hannon, 2001).
This is also true of interaction adaptation theory
(Burgoon et al., 1993) which posits that people compare
their needs, expectations, and desires to the behaviors of
conversational partners and reciprocate behaviors that match
or are more positive than those needs, expectations, and
desires. Floyd and Burgoon (1999) found that people will
match increasing affectionate behavior and compensate for
decreasing affectionate behavior when they desire and expect
affection. They also addressed the outcomes of situations
where people desire one thing but expect another. Chapman
(1992) really does not address the possibility that although
people may desire a particular LL, they might expect their
spouse to give a different one (perhaps simply based on past
interactions). Instead, he argued that people cannot and do
not feel loved if partners do not provide their desired LL,
often because the enacted behaviors may not register as
affectionate behaviors. However, Dainton’s (2000) results
support Chapman’s claim about the relationship between
LLs and satisfaction in that the extent to which expectations
about partner maintenance behaviors were met related
positively to relational satisfaction. Thus, failing to enact
certain behaviors may lead partners to feel unloved.
Chapman’s theory and interdependence theory suggest that
relational quality relates to partners meeting or exceeding
expectations of receiving their desired LL; thus, this study
explored how matches and mismatches in giving/getting LLs
could impact relational quality. Therefore, we asked the
following two research questions:
RQ4: Is self-reported relational quality impacted by the
degree to which one partner’s feel love language preference
matches their partner’s reported tendency to give love
language?
RQ5: Is self-reported relational quality predicted by
couple types?
MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY
Participants and Procedures
Couples (N - 86) included students enrolled in a speech
course at a large Midwestern university who also were in a
current romantic relationship of at least two months (n - 95)
and their romantic partners (n - 71) [86 females, 83 males, 3
unreported: ages 18-22 (n - 148), 23-30 (n - 11), 30-40 (n -
3), over 40 (n - 2), and no age reported (n - 8)]. Three
couples were excluded from the study because at least one
partner left a significant number of items blank. Students
received course credit for completing this study (some
couples involved students for both partners), and the names
of non-student partners were put into a gift certificate
drawing for their participation. Students and their romantic
partners completed the questionnaires under the authors’
supervision in a university classroom. Couples arrived
together and received questionnaire packets with
corresponding codes so partners could be matched up.
Participants were predominantly Caucasian (n - 147):
[African American (n - 6), Asian American (n - 1), & “other”
or unreported (n - 18)]. Most participants were first or
second year students (n - 107): [juniors or seniors (n - 35),
graduate students (n - 1), not in college (n - 16) & unreported
(n - 13)]. A majority of participants reported their marital
status as never married (n - 125): [married, divorced, or
widowed (n - 34) & “other” or unreported (n - 13)].
Relationship length ranged from 2-6 months (n - 39), 6
months to 2 years (n - 67), 2-5 years (n - 43), over 5 years (n
- 15), and unreported (n - 8).
Measures
Love languages. Participants received a forced-choice LL
measure. The instructions read: “Please select the statement
that best describes you by filling in ONE of the
appropriate/corresponding bubbles. It may be hard to choose
just ONE answer, but try to figure out which of the following
is most important to you... ” Participants had five choices of
“I feel the most love when my partner&”: (1) physically
touches me (i.e., gives a hug, gives a kiss, holds my hand,
touches me), (2) helps me out (i.e., running an errand,
finishing a chore for me, helping me out, helping to keep
things cleaned up), (3) spends quality time with me (i.e.,
really listening, doing something we both like, engages in
quality conversation, spending free time), (4) says
encouraging words (i.e., compliments, expresses
appreciation for me, gives me credit for something I did,
gives me positive comments), or (5) gives me gifts (i.e., a
thoughtful birthday gift, a greeting card, a present for no
special reason, a gift after being away). These items were
collapsed from Egbert and Polk’s (2006) 20-item LLS. This
method parallels Hazan and Shaver (1987, 1994), who
collapsed attachment style scale items into forced-choice
items, one for each style.
Later in the questionnaire packet, each participant also
completed two versions of the LLS in one version,
participants responded to each item about how they tended to
prefer, or feel, love whereas in the other version, they
responded about how they tended to give love to their
partner. The LLS scale consists of 20-Likert-type items that
represent Chapman’s (1992) five different LLs (four items
for each dimension). Egbert and Polk (2006) reported
sufficient reliability and construct validity, demonstrating
significant relationships between the LLs and relational
maintenance.
The rationale for creating a forced-choice LL and then
also having them complete the LLS was to explore the extent
to which people can self-identify their LL and the extent to
which that preference is reflected in the LLS score when
they could rate all five LLs. Although Hazan and Shaver’s
(1987) method of measuring attachment by selecting a single
statement has been established as consistently reliable (e.g.,
Fuller & Fincham, 1995; Hazan & Shaver, 1994; Meyers &
Landsberger, 2002; Weger & Polcar, 2000; 2002), more
recently researchers advocate continuous measures (Cassidy
& Shaver, 2008).
Reliability analyses from the current study suggested the
LLS is a reliable measure. Cronbach’s alphas ranged from
.80 to .85 for participant responses regarding how they feel
4 The Open Communicatio n Journal, 2013, Volume 7 Polk and Egbert
and give love. These numbers are in line with previous
reliability (see Egbert & Polk, 2006). In addition,
confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) using AMOS 20.0
helped test each scale’s validity. This also helped to identify
any potentially problematic items that might compound any
reduction to the goodness of fit of the overall model. Results
of the CFAs suggested a good fit for each of the five LL
dimensions: words (
χ
2 - 34.37; df - 19; p < .05; GFI - .95;
RMSEA - .07), time (
χ
2 - 50.61; df - 19; p < .001; GFI - .93;
RMSEA - .09), gifts (
χ
2 - 55.99; df - 19; p < .001; GFI - .93;
RMSEA - .09), touch (
χ
2 - 20.35; df - 19; p - .37; GFI - .97;
RMSEA - .07), and acts (
χ
2 - 36.67; df - 19; p < .01; GFI -
.95; RMSEA - .07). RMSEA fits up to .08 may reasonably
account for error (Browne & Cudeck, 1993) and
MacCullum, Browne, and Sugawara (1996) claimed fits of
.08 to .10 represent mediocre fits. In addition, traditionally
an omnibus cut-off point of 0.90 has been recommended for
the GFI; however, when sample sizes are low a higher value
of 0.95 is preferred (Miles & Shevlin, 1998). To avoid
accepting misspecified models, Hu and Bentler (1999)
recommended not accepting values under 0.90. Furthermore,
our sample was small (i.e., defined as less than 200.
Therefore, where small samples are used, the chi-square may
not discriminate between good fitting models and poor
fitting models (Kenny & McCoach, 2003). Researchers have
sought alternative indices to assess model fit. One such
alternative is Wheaton, Muthen, Alwin, and Summer’s
(1977) relative/normed chi-square (χ2/df). Although no
consensus exists about an acceptable ratio for this statistic
(Bollen, 1989), recommendations range from as high as 5.0
(Mueller, 1996; Wheaton et al., 1977) to below 3.00
(Mueller, 1996). Taken together, although the results of the
CFA do not meet all the criteria of the most stringent
guidelines, they certainly do fall within ranges considered
acceptable to good.
Quality of relationships inventory (QRI). Participants
completed the three-dimensional (depth, support, and
conflict), 25-item, Likert-type QRI (1 = not at all to 5 = very
much; Pierce, 1994). The QRI is a valid and reliable
indicator of relational quality, consistently highly correlated
to observers’ ratings of social behavior (Pierce, 1994). In the
current study, reliability of the subscales (Cronbach alphas)
was acceptable: depth = .76 (it contains the fewest items, and
deleting any items further reduced the alpha level), support =
.81, and conflict = .87. These numbers are similar to
Verhofstadt, Buysse, Rosseel, and Peene, (2006) who tested
the psychometric properties of the QRI, separating scores by
gender. Subscale alphas ranged from .79-.88. CFA results
indicated each dimension fit the data (support: χ2- 17.66, df -
14, p - .13, RMSEA - .05, CFI - .97, IFI - .97; depth: χ2 -
16.17, df - 9, p - .06, RMSEA - .07, CFI - .97, IFI - .97;
conflict χ2 - 107.43, df - 54, p - .00, RMSEA - .08, CFI - .92,
IFI - .92). As with the LLS, these numbers do not reflect an
ideal fit, but they suggest what many researchers consider
acceptable levels of fit.
Among male participants, frequencies for forced-choice
LL are as follows: (a) touch feel/give n - 39, 34; (b) acts
feel/give n - 4, 3; (c) time feel/give n - 31, 40; (d) words n -
6, 5; and (e) gifts n - 5, 5. In addition, of the female
participants, self-reports of each of the types of LL are as
follows for feel/give: (a) touch n - 31, 30; (b) acts n - 3, 3;
(c) time n - 33, 35; (d) words n - 14, 12; and (e) gifts n - 2, 3.
Undistinguished gender couples (where one or both partners
did not identify gender (n - 3) were not excluded from the
analyses.
RESULTS
To address the first question about the forced-choice
option as compared with LLS scores, we ran five separate
one-way ANOVAs for each partner using the participant’s
forced-choice feel LL and the mean scores of their own feel
LLS responses for the five dimensions. Not only were there
no significant differences (see Table 1), but the forced-
choice LL for each individual did not always correspond
with the highest mean score of the five LLS dimensions.
Thus, stating a preference for touch” in the forced-choice
question did not significantly correspond with higher scores
in the touch subscale of the LLS, as compared with those
who stated a preference for one of the other categories.
Participants’ forced-choice feel LL matched only six of the
highest means of the LLS dimensions (4 of 5 for men and 2
of 5 for women). For men, the LLS mean score for acts was
(M - 17.25, sd - 2.22), for gifts was (M - 19.33, sd - 1.15), for
time was (M - 17.03, sd - 2.52), and for words was (M -
17.67, sd - 1.75). The highest mean for the forced-choice LL
as compared with the LLS means with forced-choice touch
actually was time (M - 18.38, sd - 2.04). For women, forced-
choice answers only corresponded with two of the means for
the LLS dimensions: gifts (M - 19.00, sd - 1.41) and touch
(M - 18.71, sd - 1.85).
As an additional way to address the first question about
the feel forced-choice option as compared with feel LLS
scores, we conducted a mixed-model MANOVA with
forced-choice feel LL as the between subjects factor, and the
feel LLS responses for each of the five dimensions as the
dependent variables. To account for within-dyad variance,
we treated role in dyad (male or female) as a within-subjects
factor. Because role in dyad was input as a within-subjects
factor, we could not also run it as a predictor, between-
subjects factor. Therefore, the results reported represent all
participants and are not broken down by into male and
female. Forced-choice feel LL was not significantly related
to scores on the five feel LLS dimensions: words F(4, 160)-
.49, p-ns, time F(4, 160) - .36, p-ns, gift F(4, 160) - .48, p-ns,
acts F(4, 160) - .51, p-ns, and touch F(4, 160) - .31, p-ns.
Means and standard deviations are reported in Table 2. Thus,
stating a preference for “touch” in the forced-choice question
did not significantly correspond with higher scores in the
touch subscale of the LLS, as compared with those who
stated a preference for another category.
Similarly, to address the second question about the extent
to which partners’ reports of the LLs they tend to give
compared with their partner’s self- identified feel LL, we
conducted another set of five one-way ANOVAs. Again, no
significant differences occurred for individuals (see Table 3).
Descriptively as a group, males’ forced-choice reports
corresponded with the highest means for the LLS only on the
acts dimension (M - 18.33, sd - 2.89). For females, only
forced-choice words (M - 18.33, sd - 2.08) and gifts (M -
17.33, sd - 2.52) corresponded with the highest means for the
LLS dimensions.
As an additional way to address the second question
about the extent to which partners’ reports of the LLs they
Love Languages The Open Communication Journal, 2013, Volume 7 5
Table 1. One-Way ANOVAs Comparing Partners’ Forced-Choice Feel Love Language Preferences with their Own Love Language
Scale Subscores
Forced-Choice LL
Partner
SS
df
Mean Square
p
Words
Between
Males
15.52
4
3.88
.60
Within
439.45
78
5.63
Total
454.96
82
Between
Females
28.05
4
7.01
.26
Within
409.38
78
5.25
Total
437.42
82
Time
Between
Males
7.02
4
1.75
.91
Within
548.05
78
7.03
Total
555.06
82
Between
Females
11.97
4
2.99
.76
Within
499.19
78
6.40
Total
511.16
82
Gifts
Between
Males
50.14
4
12.54
.17
Within
586.46
78
7.51
Total
636.60
82
Between
Females
55.33
4
13.83
.24
Within
759.66
78
9.74
Total
814.99
82
Acts
Between
Males
8.84
4
2.21
.88
Within
581.16
78
7.45
Total
590.00
82
Between
Females
11.63
4
2.91
.79
Within
535.93
78
6.87
Total
397.86
82
Touch
Between
Males
25.07
4
6.27
.36
Within
444.16
78
5.69
Total
469.23
82
Between
Females
15.49
4
3.87
.54
Within
382.36
78
4.90
Total
397.86
82
tend to give compared with their partner’s feel LL, we
conducted another mixed-model MANOVA with forced-
choice feel LL as the between-subjects factor, and the partner
give LLS responses for each of the five dimensions as the
dependent variables. To account for within-dyad variance,
we treated role in dyad (male or female) as a within-subjects
factor.
Again, because role in dyad was input as a within-
subjects factor, we could not also run it as a predictor,
between-subjects factor. Therefore, the results represent all
participants and are not broken down by sex. Forced-choice
feel LL was not significantly related to partner give scores on
the five LLS dimensions: words F(4, 160) - 1.43, p-ns, time
F(4, 160) - .54, p-ns, gift F(4, 160) - .07, p-ns, acts F(4,
160)-.40, p-ns, and touch F(4, 160) - 1.02, p-ns. Means and
standard deviations are reported in Table 4.
To address the third research question about the potential
couple types, first it was necessary to record all the different
combinations of couples possible with regard to giving and
feeling LLs. For the purpose of this study, we set parameters
6 The Open Communicatio n Journal, 2013, Volume 7 Polk and Egbert
for couple types based on the forced-choice LL the dyadic
partners reported feeling and giving, resulting in 12 different
types of couples (see Table 5 for couple types, frequencies,
and examples). Then we collapsed those 12 types down into
3 couple types based on whether the partners matched on
giving one another’s felt LL, whether they were partly
matched (one received his/her felt LL but the other did not),
or whether they were mismatched (both partners gave a
different LL than their partner’s felt LL). Couple types 1 and
12 (see Table 5) represent matches-- the couples Chapman
(1992) claimed experience the highest relational quality
(although no couple actually surfaced as Type 12). Couple
types 3, 4, 10, and 11 involve partial matches, and types 2, 5,
6, 7, 8, and 9 involve neither partner receiving his/her
preferred LL. The most frequently occurring couple type
(Type 2, n - 39) represented a mismatch. The within-subject
LL consistency between a partner’s feel preference and what
that partner gives also is worth reporting. For male
participants, 68 reported a match, whereas 15 reported a
partial match or mismatch. For female participants, 72
reported a match as compared with 11 who reported a partial
match or mismatch.
Table 2. Means and Standard D eviations from Mixed-Model
MANOVA of Forced-Choice Feel Love Language
Preferences with Participants’ Own Love Language
Scale Subscores
LL Item
Mean
SD
Words
17.27
2.33
Time
17.08
2.55
Gifts
16.25
2.99
Acts
15.99
2.66
Touch
18.12
2.30
Investigating the fourth research question involved
testing Chapman’s prediction that couples who give and
receive one another’s preferred LL experience enhanced
relational quality. We were interested in these collapsed
couple types -- whether couples were matched, partially
matched, or mismatched with their felt LL preferences and
tendencies to give LLs as opposed to whether specific
differences in the LL combinations contribute differently to
relational quality. Therefore, we used the collapsed couple
types of: match (both partners gave and received preferred
LLs; n = 22), partial match (one partner received his/her
preferred LL, but the other did not; n = 13), and mismatch
(neither partner received his/her preferred LL; n = 48). See
Table 6. Then, we conducted a one-way ANOVA. Results
yielded a significant difference for couple combination on
relational quality discrepancy (F (2, 80) = 5.92, p < .005, η2
= 0.13). A Tukey Post Hoc analysis revealed that matched
and mismatched couples report greater consistency (less
discrepancy) than partially matched couples in assessments
of quality. No difference surfaced between matched and
mismatched couples, but both were different than partially
matched couples (partial and match = 11.36, partial and
mismatch = 10.25, match and mismatch = 1.11 (p < .05 with
unequal cell means, not weighted).
For our final question, we wanted to explore the reports
of relational quality (summed QRIs that included both
partners) as to whether it could be predicted by collapsed
couple type (matched, partially matched, or mismatched
couples). We conducted a one-way ANOVA, but the result
was not significant (F (2, 80) - 0.70, p - .50). To understand
more, we examined the total individual relational quality
score for each member of each couple. Then, we placed each
partner into a low or high quality category and compared
whether the couple matched on having high scores, low
scores, or mismatched scores (one low score and one high
score). We then ran a crosstabs analysis. The result was not
significant. χ2 (4, N - 83) - 1.84, p - .76 (see Table 7).
DISCUSSION
The results of this study extend Chapman’s (1992) thesis
in a few key ways. First, this study tested the construct
validity of Egbert and Polk’s (2006) LLS. The forced-choice
items were based the LLS, so it provided a different way for
testing the predictive ability of the LLS. Because Egbert and
Polk only tested how one’s partner tends to feel loved, this
study extends the validity of the LL items because it
examined both partners, providing a better snapshot how
LLs impact relational quality but suggesting some potential
problems with the concept of LLs.
For first two research questions about the forced-choice
option as compared with the 20-item LLS, results indicated
no significant differences. People’s forced-choice preferred
LL did not surface as a single preferred LL on the 20-item
LLS. The same held true with regard to each partner’s
forced-choice preferred LL and the 20-item LLS for what
partner’s reported tending to give – no significant differences
surfaced. The lack of significant findings suggests further
testing should be conducted before making any
generalizations about LLs. Whereas, it might be easy simply
to say that the LLS did not accurately predict a person’s
preferred LL, we suggest other reasons should be considered.
The main reason we contend that the scale itself is valid
relates to the CFA results for the LLS. The data fit the
models well, or at acceptable levels, especially considering
the sample size. For example one reason the LLS scale did
not accurately predict a person’s preferred LL may relate to
the age of participants. Young romantic couples may
struggle, for example, about how much touch, especially
sexual touch, should define the relationship. This might
indicate that people need a period of time after entering
adulthood before they experience that immediate LL
recognition that Chapman (1992) discussed. Perhaps instead,
at that relational stage, young couples feel that all the LL
behaviors are important. This also would support Dainton’s
(2000) claim that people expect partners to perform all types
of relational maintenance behaviors. Further testing could
debunk Chapman’s notion of a single LL preference and
provide more support for the idea that people expect a
variety of behaviors that do not fall into one particular
category, or LL.
After clustering the couples into 12 types based on
preferences to receive and tendencies to give LLs and then
paring down those 12 types into 3 categories (match, partial
match, or mismatch) in order to address the fourth question,
these data revealed some important findings about the nature
of LLs and how they support Chapman’s (1992) claims. Of
Love Languages The Open Communication Journal, 2013, Volume 7 7
Table 3. One-Way ANOVAs Comparing Partners’ Forced-Choice Feel Love Language with Their Partners’ Tendency to Give
Love Language Scale Subscores
Forced Choice LL
Partner
SS
df
Mean Square
F
p
Words
Between
Males
22.19
4
5.55
1.00
.41
Within
432.77
78
5.55
Total
454.96
82
Between
Females
19.22
4
4.80
.90
.47
Within
418.21
78
5.36
Total
437.42
82
Time
Between
Males
39.03
4
9.76
1.48
.22
Within
516.04
78
6.62
Total
555.06
82
Between
Females
29.70
4
7.42
1.20
.32
Within
481.46
78
6.17
Total
511.16
82
Gifts
Between
Males
55.27
4
13.82
1.85
.13
Within
581.34
78
6.62
Total
636.60
82
Between
Females
84.19
4
21.05
2.25
.07
Within
730.80
78
9.37
Total
814.99
82
Acts
Between
Males
58.76
4
14.69
2.16
.08
Within
531.24
78
6.81
Total
469.23
82
Between
Females
49.56
4
12.39
1.94
.11
Within
498.01
78
6.39
Total
547.57
82
Touch
Between
Males
27.54
4
6.89
1.22
.31
Within
441.69
78
5.66
Total
469.23
82
Between
Females
20.65
4
5.16
1.07
.38
Within
377.21
78
4.84
Total
397.86
82
the 83 couples, 22 represent a matching type, 13 represent a
partial match, and 48 represent a match. These findings
suggest Chapman was onto something about partners often
not giving one another’s preferred LL. Given the large
number of mismatches (partial or total) -- a full 73.5% of the
couples experienced a partial or total mismatch as compared
with 26.5% matches – this result points to the possibility that
mismatches could be important to understanding relational
outcomes, and especially that mismatches may negatively
affect relational quality.
Some of the specific findings about the 12 couple types
also are worth discussion. None of the 83 couples matched
the style that Chapman (1992) advocated (needing to learn to
express a partner’s LL). Of the 22 matched couples, none of
them actually had to alter their behavior to match their
partner’s LL it already matched their own. This finding is
8 The Open Communicatio n Journal, 2013, Volume 7 Polk and Egbert
important because couples might not be adapting to a
partner’s LL preference, or it is an infrequent occurrence
(under 1.2% of couples in this study). The couples that
reported a match were couples where both partners felt and
gave the same LL, suggesting that making a conscious
choice to “speak” a partner’s LL may not apply to the
couples in this study.
Table 4. Means and Standard Deviations from Mixed-Model
MANOVA Comparing Partners’ Forced-Choice
Feel Love Language with Their Partners’ Tendency
to Give Love Language Scale Subscores
LL Item
Mean
SD
Words
17.46
2.27
Time
17.67
2.31
Gifts
15.62
3.29
Acts
16.02
2.87
Touch
18.25
2.07
Because Chapman (1992) claimed that mismatches often
occur, noting the types of mismatch is worthwhile. Of
mismatched couples, the most frequent and most obvious
finding is that when partners feel different LLs, they are
likely to give what they feel. Our sample included 39
mismatched couples who reported this, and an additional 13
couples reported a partial match, meaning that only one
partner is having his/her love tank filled. This suggests
Chapman is correct in attempting to help people understand
the impact of LL differences, and all of these couple types
are candidates for Chapman’s message.
Perhaps the most interesting couples are the five couple
types (5, 6, 7, 8, and 9; see Table 5) who represented the
other types of mismatches. For example, in couple type 5,
both partners actually prefer the same LL, but neither partner
gives this preferred LL. These partners contradict
Chapman’s (1992) idea that people give their own preferred
LL. In addition, in couple 7, each partner feels a different LL
and gives a LL different from their preference, but it still
does not match each partner’s preference. In addition,
couples 6 and 8 are interesting because they represent a
complex type of couple where one partner gives the LL that
s/he feels (which Chapman claims is natural), and the other
partner gives a LL different from his/her own preference;
however, both partners fail to give the other’s preference.
Luckily, no couples reported the type 9 mismatch where
couples each prefer a different LL from one another; yet,
they give a LL different both from their own and from their
partner’s preference.
In these mismatched cases, additional variables could
explain the LL discrepancies. First, partners see themselves
as complementary in terms of LL, suggesting they do not
expect the other partner desires the same type of behaviors.
Another explanation is, like Stafford and Canary (1991)
found, the type of relationship (dating, dating seriously,
engaged, married) could factor into reports of relational
behaviors that are similar to LLs. Finally, maybe like Bell,
Daly, and Gonzalez (1987) found, perception of quantity of
behaviors is less important than the type of LL performed.
These data revealed that matched and mismatched
couples reported greater consistency in their individual-level
assessments of relational quality than partially matched
couples. No difference between mismatched and matched
couples arose, but both were different from partially matched
couples. Equity theory provides some support (Walster,
Walster, & Berscheid, 1978); if both partners perceive
similar needs (either being met or unmet) they may perceive
equity. Although not ideal, this situation may be more
satisfactory than when one partner feels underbenefited
whereas the other is receiving what s/he desires. For
example, Sprecher (2001) found underbenefiting, but not
overbenefiting, is significantly associated with distress, and
being underbenefited may motivate people to demand equity
(Hatfield & Rason, 1995). Such demands may play out
differently depending on whether one or both partners feel
underbenefited about LLs.
In addition, Dainton (2003) found inequity was linked
positively with the relational maintenance behavior of
openness and suggested that people may use openness as an
equity restoration behavior. Furthermore, researchers have
linked sexual behaviors (initiating, agreeing to, or refusing
sex) with inequity. Perhaps this means that people change
the LL they give after perceiving inequity in terms of what
they receive – not to punish the partner by discontinuing
his/her felt LL – but by attempting to alert their partner of
perceived inequity.
The lack of significance for the final research question
may be the result of the effects being washed out by the
combined total scores. The crosstabs analysis results seem
puzzling. Namely, the couples with mismatched LLs largely
reported high relational quality. Perhaps again, as long as
both partners feel underbenefited, they may not experience
diminished relational quality.
LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
One limitation to this study is its homogenous college
student sample. Although this population is socially active
and invested in romantic relationships, the relationships tend
to be less developed than in the general population. In
addition, by virtue of age, many of them tend to be less
experienced in relationships. More diversity of participants
also would make the results more generalizable. Having a
sample that includes couples with a wide scope of
relationship length would help us to verify the extent to
which the LLS accurately measures Chapman’s notion of a
single favorite LL.
Variables like relationship length and age affect
relational behaviors over time. For example, maintenance
changes over the course of relationships (Stafford & Canary,
1991; Canary, Stafford, & Semic (2002). In addition, Ciak,
Hutchison, Reed, and Saner (2009) found that time impacted
people’s attributions of flirting behaviors, Willis and Briggs
(1992) found gender differences in the initiation of touch
among dating or married couples, and Guerrero and
Anderson (1994) found that partners increasingly matched
touch behavior as the relationship developed. Therefore, it is
worthwhile to test the extent to which people’s felt LL
Love Languages The Open Communication Journal, 2013, Volume 7 9
Table 5. Different Love Language Couple Comb inations
Coup le
Type
Couple Description
Example
Fre-
quency
Collap sed
Type
1
Couple matches on both giving and receiving LLs
Partner 1 prefers and gives time;
Partner 2 prefers and gives time
22
Match
2
Both partners prefer different LL from each other, and both
partners give their own preferred LL
Partner 1 prefers and gives time; Partner 2
prefers and gives touch
39
Mismatch
3
Partner 1 prefers a different LL than gives, and Partner 2
prefers and gives own LL (Partner 1’s LL is same as
Partner 2, so even though Partner 2 gives what Partner 1
wants, there’s no extra effort whereas Partner 1’s giving
involves extra effort)
Partner 1 prefers time but gives touch;
Partner 2 prefers and gives touch
6
Partial Match
4
Partner 1 gives own preferred LL, and Partner 2 prefers a
different LL but gives Partner 1’s preferred LL
Partner 1 prefers and gives time; Partner 2
prefers touch but gives time
3
Partial Match
5
Both partners prefer the same LL, but both partners do not
give this LL
Partner 1 prefers time but gives touch;
Partner 2 prefers time but gives acts
1
Mismatch
6
Partner 1 prefers and gives own LL, but Partner 2 prefers a
different LL and gives Partner 1 a LL different from
preference
Partner 1 prefers touch and gives touch;
Partner 2 prefers time but gives acts
4
Mismatch
7
Partner 1 gives a different LL than own preferred but not
matching Partner 2 preference, and Partner 2 gives a
different LL from own preferred but not matching Partner
1 preference; however both partners are giving the same
LL
Partner 1 prefers time but gives touch;
Partner 2 prefers gifts but gives touch
1
Mismatch
8
Partner 1 gives a LL different from own preference but not
one that Partner 2 prefers, and Partner 2 gives and prefers
own LL which does not match Partner 1’s preferred
Partner 1 prefers touch but gives acts;
Partner 2 prefers and gives words
3
Mismatch
9
Both partners prefer different LLs, and they give LL
different from own preference but not matching partner
preference
Partner 1 prefers touch but gives acts;
Partner 2 prefers gifts and gives words
0
Mismatch
10
Partner 1 prefers one LL but gives Partner 2’s preferred
LL, and Partner 2 prefers and gives own LL
Partner 1 prefers touch but gives words;
Partner 2 prefers and gives words
3
Partial Match
11
Partner 1 prefers and gives the same LL, but Partner 2
prefers same LL as Partner 1 but gives a different LL
Partner 1 prefers and gives touch; Partner 2
prefers touch but gives acts
1
Partial Match
12
Partner 1 prefers one LL but gives Partner 2’s preferred
LL; Partner 2 feels a different LL than Partner 1, but gives
Partner 1’s preferred LL – this is Chapman’s ideal
Partner 1 prefers time but gives touch;
Partner 2 prefers touch but gives time
0
Match
Note: The examples do not represent all the LL combinations possible within that couple type
changes rather than being trait-like as Chapman (1992)
suggests.
Future studies also could look at more complex
combinations of data. In addition to collecting data on self-
reports of LL preferences and partner reports of giving LLs,
it would be helpful to gather data on what LL behaviors
people perceive their partners give them. Dindia (2000)
suggested that research should explore the relationship
between perceptions of partner behaviors, satisfaction, and
the amount and type of enacted behaviors. Chapman’s
(1992) theory provides a relevant link to this needed research
because of his clear claims about learning to enact a
partner’s felt LL rather than simply to enact those preferred
by oneself. Perhaps specific LL combinations lead to higher
relational quality. For example, perhaps couples in which
both partners prefer and give time report higher relational
quality than couples in which both partners prefer and give
acts.
CONCLUSION
We hope this research stimulates more study of relational
behaviors and relational quality. Of special note is the
finding that behavioral discrepancies offer more explanatory
power than the behaviors themselves. The most pressing
issue is determining the nature of discrepancies between
partners’ desires and what the other gives. Are these
discrepancies relationship-promoting or the cause for unmet
expectations and disappointment? Whereas this study
10 The Open Communication Journal, 2013, Volume 7 Polk and Egbert
Table 6. Frequency of Collap sed Couple Relational Quality by Collapsed Couple Type
Collapsed Couple
Type
Represented by Couple
Types
Matching High Relational
Quality
Matching Low Relational
Quality
Mismatched Relational
Quality
Match
1 & 12
14
2
6
Partial Match
3, 4, 10, & 11
6
1
6
Mismatch
2, 5, 6, 7, 8, & 9
28
6
14
Table 7. Crosstabs Analysis of Collapsed Couple Relational Quality and Collapsed Couple Type
Count
Quality Match or Mismatch
Match
Mismatch
Total
Match
16
6
22
Partial
7
6
13
Coll Type
Mismatch
33
15
48
Total
56
27
83
pointed out the importance of this issue and the possible
configurations of such discrepancies in couples, only future
research can provide the explanations.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST
The authors confirm that this article content has no
conflicts of interest.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors wish to thank Mary E. Braz for the
consultation she provided on this project.
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Received: September 20, 2012 Revised: March 19, 2013 Accepted: March 22, 2013
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... In one version of the scale participants responded about how they tend to feel love. To remain consistent with the literature we followed the term 'felt LL' that was used in Egbert and Polk's [31] study to infer the preferred way of receiving love from one's partner. However, it should be noted that two forms of the LL scale provide the data on what makes people feel loved without directly examining what is being preferred, which might be a potential conceptual problem with the LL measure. ...
... Other aspects of Chapman's [1] claim have not been supported. Egbert and Polk [31] tested 84 university student couples, who had been together for at least two months. The aims was to check whether partners well-matched in their reported preferences and expressions of LLs reported greater relationship quality. ...
... LLs were assessed using two methods. The first was the forced-choice method used by Egbert and Polk [31], while the second one included two forms of a LL scale (LLS) requiring independent ratings of preferences, which was developed and validated by Egbert and Polk [29]. ...
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Chapman's Love Languages hypothesis claims that (1) people vary in the ways they prefer to receive and express affection and (2) romantic partners who communicate their feelings congruent with their partner's preferences experience greater relationship quality. The author proposes five distinct preferences and tendencies for expressing love, including: Acts of Service, Physical Touch, Words of Affirmation, Quality Time and Gifts. In the present study partners (N = 100 heterosexual couples) completed measures assessing their preferences and behavioral tendencies for a) expressions of love and b) reception of signs of affection, for each of the five proposed "love languages". Relationship satisfaction, sexual satisfaction and empathy were also assessed. The degree of the within-couple mismatch was calculated separately for each individual based on the discrepancies between the person's felt (preferred) and their partner's expressed love language. The joint mismatch indicator was a sum of discrepancies across the five love languages. Matching on love languages was associated with both relationship and sexual satisfaction. In particular, people who expressed their affection in the way their partners preferred to receive it, experienced greater satisfaction with their relationships and were more sexually satisfied compared to those who met their partner's needs to lesser extent. Empathy was expected to be a critical factor for better understanding of and responding to the partner's needs. Results provided some support for this hypothesis among male but not female participants.
... The first group investigated the factor structure and construct validity, while the second group examined the relationship between preferred love languages and relationship satisfaction (Bland & McQueen, 2018). For example, previous studies attempted to support and validate the five factors structure of Five Love Languages (Cook et al., 2013;Egbert & Polk, 2006;Polk & Egbert, 2013). Another example explored the relationship between love languages and self-regulatory behavior toward relationship satisfaction (Bunt & Hazelwood, 2017). ...
... Likert and rating scales could not determine one's dominant love language as the scales only measured the degree of agreement or level of love languages for each aspect. An ipsative scale would be beneficial as it allowed participants to choose one dominant aspect among the other aspects of the FLL (Polk & Egbert, 2013). This current study observed couples' love language compatibility and how it would correlate with marital satisfaction. ...
... The scale was in Bahasa Indonesia. Moreover, this study added a forcedchoice scale of FLL (Polk & Egbert, 2013). Participants were 'forced' to pick one out of five available statements. ...
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Love is an essential part of human experience and love languages have been studied to validate its factors’ structures to explain what makes people feel loved. The current study addresses the gap that love research shall not rely on student samples and it needs to measure the actual outcome of love languages. This study aims to gather empirical evidence for love languages’ factor structure and its relation to the outcome variable. The method for this study is a quantitative survey with 250 couples reported their love languages using a rating-scale and forced-choice scale. The data analysis examined the factor structure of the love languages model and estimated the association between love languages compatibility and marital satisfaction. The factorial analysis showed that the five factors solution was not supported and love languages compatibility did not affect couples’ marital satisfaction. This result brought discussions on how popular psychology concepts need to be under the scrutiny of scientific investigation and that different contexts may have different factors on what makes people feel loved.
... This study changes the FLL scale used by the researchers. This change was conducted by translating the items on FLL scale used by (and with permission from) Polk and Egbert (2013). The authors also initiated a change from the Likert scale to a scale recommended by Treiblmaier and Filzmoser (2009). ...
... The instrument for data gathering utilized in the Five Love Languages Scale was reformulated by the authors. In the initial steps, the authors contacted Denise M. Polk to request permission to translate the scale used in her previous research (Polk & Egbert, 2013) into Indonesian language. The authors chose to use instrument translation as the initial step as the characteristics of the instrument used by Polk and Egbert (2013) closely resembled an integer scale or a continuous rating scale. ...
... In the initial steps, the authors contacted Denise M. Polk to request permission to translate the scale used in her previous research (Polk & Egbert, 2013) into Indonesian language. The authors chose to use instrument translation as the initial step as the characteristics of the instrument used by Polk and Egbert (2013) closely resembled an integer scale or a continuous rating scale. This scale initially consisted of 20 items. ...
... Lastly, based on procedures utilized by McElroy-Heltzel et al. (2018), participants qualified for the study if they were currently in a committed romantic relationship for a minimum of three months or longer. While we are not aware of any consistently used benchmark of relationship duration for classifying couples as "committed," other relationship studies have set the inclusion criteria at 2 months (see Bland & McQueen, 2018;Egbert & Polk, 2006;Polk & Egbert, 2013). We set a slightly higher parameter to ensure some degree of relationship establishment and commitment. ...
Article
Purpose/objective: Little is known about romantic relationship adjustment or perceptions of relationship quality (e.g., commitment and trust) among sexual minority persons with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore if collective self-esteem, disability adjustment, attachment styles, and cultural humility served as unique correlates and predictors of relationship adjustment and relationship quality among sexual minority persons (e.g., lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer) with disabilities. Method: Ninety-two participants identifying as sexual minority persons living with a variety of disabilities (e.g., physical, psychiatric, medical, neurological), and who were partnered with sexual minority persons not living with a disability, were recruited using Amazon Mechanical Turk to complete an electronic questionnaire. Results: Responses of 92 participants were analyzed using bivariate correlations and 3 separate blockwise hierarchical regression models. To varying degrees, collective self-esteem, attachment styles, and cultural humility served as significant correlates and predictors of dyadic adjustment, commitment, and trust. Implications: Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. Rehabilitation psychologists and other health care providers are encouraged to consider collective self-esteem, attachment styles, and cultural humility when working with sexual minority persons with disabilities in romantic relationships. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
... Salah satu sumber bukti empiris adalah konvergensi hubungan antara dua variabel yang terkait (Brown, 2009). Beberapa penelitian telah dilakukan sebelumnya terhadap bahasa cinta yang menguji kesahihan konsep ini (Cook et al., 2013;Egbert & Polk, 2006;Polk & Egbert, 2013). Di Indonesia, sebagian besar penelitian baru melakukan uji konsistensi internal melalui analisis faktor dan hasil penelitian belum menunjukkan sumber bukti yang mendukung gagasan awal Chapman (Surijah & Sari, 2018;Surijah & Septiarly, 2016). ...
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This research aims to discuss theories of Love especially in typology perspective which included current Five Love Languages (FLL) theory. This research also examined whether someone who feels loved based on a certain aspect of FLL would also express love in a similar fashion. FLL scale was divided into passive (felt love) and active (express love) form. 637 participants who were/are in a romantic relationship responded to both scales. Regression analysis examined the contribution from each of active FLL aspect toward passive FLL aspects. The result showed passive FLL was determined by active FLL expression and similar passive-active aspects showed the strongest relationship. The result brought implication to future study and on how to better understand a couple’s need to feel loved.
... One of the goals of this study of love languages is to find valid theories that can help couples understand their needs in a relationship. For example, Polk and Egbert (2013) in their research in the United States have researched couples who have different types of love language. However, the findings of this study indicate the need for more in-depth study by improving the FLL measurement method to an inductive approach in FLL-related research. ...
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