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Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews

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... To this end, different theories exist in the literature regarding the ways in which children's identities are formed. Predominantly, however, the question of subjectivity has been approached from the perspectives of social constructionism (Foucault, 1978;Foucault, 1980a;Foucault, 1980b), Judith Butler's (1993; performativity theory, and developmental psychology (Piaget, 1948;Piaget, 1957). On the former two, it is worth noting that there is little agreement on whether either Foucault or Butler linguistically advocate a theory of social constructionism or social constructivism. ...
... Michel Foucault's (1978;1980a;1980b) social constructionist approach examined how power circulated through society in the form of constructed discourses in the second part of the twentieth century. Foucault (1978) defines power as essentially self-reproducing and constitutive of norms and disciplinary subjects. ...
... I argued that mechanisms of testing, regulatory inspection, monitoring, audit, and measurement have all come to create a developmentalist mode of understanding subjectivity. In examining how one might challenge curriculum logics, the following section explored the primary theoretical frameworks that were concerned with understanding children's subjectivity: social constructionism (Foucault, 1978;1980a;1980b), performativity theory (Butler, 2004), and developmental psychology (Piaget, 1957). While I maintained that there remains utility across each approach, my analysis also revealed limitations across all three perspectives insofar as they naturalise an individualist metaphysical basis rooted in Cartesian logic (Gatens, 2009;Mignolo, 2012). ...
Thesis
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Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of the West of Scotland for the award of Doctor of Philosophy in collaboration with Early Years Scotland. April 2022. i Declaration I declare that this thesis is entirely my own and has not been previously submitted for another PhD or comparable award. Word count (excluding ancillary data, reference lists, appendices)-73,025 Shaddai Tembo April 2022 ii Abstract This doctoral thesis examines the formation of children's subjectivities, related to the metaphysical conditions of being and becoming a subject, within fully outdoor early childhood provision in Scotland. The role of outdoor play provision has been made central in recent years by the Scottish Government as part of the broader expansion of Early Learning and Childcare (Scottish Government, 2017a; Scottish Government, 2017b; Education Scotland, 2019c; Scottish Government, 2020a). This enhanced focus raises questions around how children form their subjectivities in such spaces and how this may differ from what is known about subjectivity within conventional indoor provision. Further, while the existing knowledge base on subjectivity in childhood is derived mainly from the intellectual progress made through the fields of social constructionism (Foucault, 1978), performativity theory (Butler, 2004; 2006; 2011) and developmental psychology (Piaget, 1948; 1957), concerns have been raised regarding the extent to which such frameworks may give primacy to the human, and the logics of humanism, over and above the non-human world (Barad, 2007; Dolphijn and Tuin, 2012; Braidotti, 2013). Such concerns warrant special attention in relation to entirely outdoor environments, where these approaches may underplay the significance of ontological and ontogenetic matters that contribute toward the formation of subjectivity. This study applies a sociomaterial metaphysical framework to propose an alternative way of understanding how subjectivities come to form in early childhood environments, bringing together Spinozist (2002) monism and insights from process philosophy (Massumi, 2002) in relation to Deleuze and Guattari's (1987) concepts of the assemblage and affect. Methodologically, a ethnographic approach, inspired partly from the postqualitative field of scholarship, is employed to gather data on children's subjectivities at Wood Fire, a fully outdoor early childhood setting. The findings of this study reveal the novel materiality and relationality of fully outdoor early childhood provision through which subjectivities are informed , and also point toward the ways that social and cultural determinacies continue to affectively orientate children's desires in the absence of clearly demarcated material spaces. Thus, these findings a demonstrate more expanded understanding of how we, humans, are produced as individuals in specific encounters through processes of 'affective sociomaterialisation'. Through the presentation of data in textual, visual and cinematic modes, practitioners are encouraged to re-evaluate the role of outdoor provision through a sociomaterial metaphysics that challenges conventional knowledges about how children's subjectivities are formed. Practically, this carries implications for how the materiality of outdoor environments is understood to contribute to the child's sense of self on more expansive terms. iii
... En este epílogo, me voy a concentrar en la segunda crisis propuesta por Couldry (2020), con un especial énfasis en identidades, expresiones, y experiencias de género. De esta manera, voy a bosquejar interrogantes que también incluirán insumos tomados de la teoría social clásica (Foucault 1980;Giddens 1991). El espíritu de este ejercicio pretende perfilar retos y dilemas que todavía están en ebullición, que los experimentamos todos los días de alguna forma u otra. ...
... En términos de identidades y expresiones de género, explorar sus articulaciones sociales implica reconocer cómo diversas prácticas, discursos, objetos y afectividades son movilizados en diferentes instituciones e instancias de la vida social para configurar patrones y sesgos experienciales. Con esto en mente, quisiera argumentar que la seguridad ontológica acarrea sentidos de realidad que son establecidos a partir de contextos sociohistóricos específicos, pero también a partir de tensiones ideológicas, relaciones de poder, y, por consiguiente, dinámicas de violencia simbólica (Butler 2004;Foucault 1980). Ahora bien, es importante resaltar que es necesario tener nociones completas de seguridad ontológica para llevar a cabo la vida cotidiana e interpretar nuestro rol dentro de una sociedad y cultura. ...
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...una investigación realizada por el OIMP alerta sobre la necesidad de establecer en el país “normativas actualizadas e integrales que permitan solventar los vacíos legales hoy por hoy existentes para la adecuada regulación y la debida responsabilización de aquellas empresas anunciantes y agencias publicitarias que terminan por atentar contra los derechos de las mujeres y/o la igualdad de género”, así como sobre la importancia de “reducir el amplio desconocimiento detectado entre la población y el sector privado de los instrumentos legales y mecanismos existentes para la protección de los derechos de las mujeres referentes a su imagen en el ámbito publicitario”... Por ello se planteó el estudio en el que se basa esta publicación, el cual estuvo orientado a analizar los alcances y limitaciones que tienen las leyes existentes en Hispanoamérica y España para la regulación del sexismo contra las mujeres en la publicidad, con miras a extraer recomendaciones de política pública y posibles modificaciones legislativas aplicables al contexto costarricense para lograr un cumplimiento más efectivo de los mandatos internacionales ratificados por el país en la protección jurídica específica para las mujeres en materia de discriminación y violencia
... In this regard, I adopted the framework proposed by Theo van Leeuwen in his 2008 Discourse and Practice. New Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis, in which the author viewed discourse as recontextualised social practice, and understood discourse as social cognition rather than linguistic production by defining it in Foucault's (1977) sense of "socially constructed knowledge of some social practice developed in specific contexts" (Foucault 1977 quoted in van Leeuwen 2008: 6) instead of a stretch of speech, writing or a text. ...
... In this regard, I adopted the framework proposed by Theo van Leeuwen in his 2008 Discourse and Practice. New Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis, in which the author viewed discourse as recontextualised social practice, and understood discourse as social cognition rather than linguistic production by defining it in Foucault's (1977) sense of "socially constructed knowledge of some social practice developed in specific contexts" (Foucault 1977 quoted in van Leeuwen 2008: 6) instead of a stretch of speech, writing or a text. ...
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Based on Teun van Dijk’s (1998) hypothesis that political discourse is always a form of action, this paper presents a speech-act based analysis of five extracts selected from the French presidential debate between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen on April 20, 2022, and focuses on the derisive other-representation employed by the protagonists to disqualify each other in front of the audience. In the analysis, I examine these “actions” in discourse via several particularities of ridiculing, as practice in interaction, and the conditions for the occurrence in the context of the presidential debate as a discursive genre. Presidential debates are a sub-genre of political (>presidential)discourse (Chilton 2004; Ilie 2018). Technically, they are highly adversarial types of interactions in which the participants are mainly preoccupied with delegitimising the opponent while exerting a politically favourable influence on the audience. The “serious” nature of these events imposes multiple discursive regulations; in other words, the participants are not permitted to insult their opponent in a straightforward manner, thus being compelled to resort to various rhetorical devices to enable them to fight an effective battle of words (Jankélévich 1964). These devices often form part of the spectrum of negative humour, such as irony and sarcasm, which are popular in the genre for softening the offensiveness of any insult, and which exempt the attacker from aggressiveness and enable them to create an impression of wittiness in front of the audience. The five examples chosen for analysis all highlight derisive references to the opponent, “acting” to disqualify the target via diverse mechanisms, and reveal less obvious nuances of the (always negative) intended meaning that is conveyed. The analysis was conducted using the framework of Critical Discourse Analysis, adopted the principles of language as dialogue proposed by Edda Weigand (2010), and discourse as a recontextualised social practice as proposed by van Leeuwen (2008), while also considering the principles of political discourse analysis presented by van Dijk (1998), Chilton (2004) and Ilie (2018), which is primarily seen as positive self-representation and negative other-representation. This analysis forms part of the larger project in my PhD thesis, entitled Ridiculing Strategies in Presidential Discourse (in progress), which focuses on the forms, functions and effects of ridiculing expressions used by candidates for the presidency in recent pre-election debates in the USA, France and Romania.
... Młodzież ukraińskiego pochodzenia przed ucieczką do Kanady wystawiona była na i sama rozwijała kontrpamięć, by przywołać kategorię Michela Foucault (1977) opisującą pamięć opozycyjną wobec nie tylko pamięci oficjalnej, zatwierdzonej przez reżim i zgodnej z jego wizją dziejów, ale także wobec nieofi cjalnej "narodowej" pamięci o kontaktach, relacjach i konfl iktach z Ukraińcami. Kontrpamięć owa miała cechy pamięci sprywatyzowanej, opozycyjnej wobec dominującej wizji narodowych dziejów, a przekazywano ją w prywatno-rodzinno-towarzyskich kręgach. ...
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The book is dedicated to the migratory experience of Ukrainian immigrants from Poland to Canada, their practices and narrations of memory, and communication between migrants and Poland. The empirical basis derives from ethnographic field studies conducted in 2014–2016 in Edmonton and Toronto in Canada. In total, the research lasted 12 months, during which I conducted a long-term participant observation, ethnographic unstructured interviews and narrative interviews, typical for the biographical method. In addition, private correspondence, newsletters, and websites of diasporic organizations, as well as materials posted by the respondents on social media were analyzed, and the results of field and internet research were integrated as part of the whole analysis. The subject of my attention was a group of people of Ukrainian descent who came from Poland to Canada in the 1980s. I tried to show the phenomenon of migratory memory and its impact on the formation of diasporas with regard to this group of Ukrainian descent. My intention was also to fill the gap in anthropological research on migration and diasporas and in research on emigration overseas from Poland in the 1980s.
... This allows for more than one genealogy for a particular phenomenon, as descent can be ascribed to different ancestors (Roberts, 2013). 'Genealogy' as whakapapa seems to come closer to Foucault's (1980) use of that word, in that mātauranga are a tool of governance. This is because a parable accompanies the genealogy, tracing it back to ancient ancestors; and the parable contains moral guidelines (tikanga). ...
Article
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A paradigm shift has occurred in cognitive science from what's been called 'I-psychology' or 'cognitivism', to 'e-psychology' or 'enactivism'. Although 'e-psychology' now occupies, as one of its proponents claims, the cafes and wine-bars of cognitive science, it is still "the barbarian at the gates" of clinical and, to a lesser extent, counselling psychology. This paper explores this paradigm shift and some of the implications for psychotherapy. In this new paradigm, the practitioner is no longer positioned as a transcendent Kantian observer of others, as the 'scientist-practitioner' model proposed, but a highly responsive being open to being changed themselves by the therapeutic conversation they are part of. Outcome monitoring tools assist the therapist stay ethically attuned to the client, as the client becomes better attuned to the world. Ethically, in this new paradigm, attunement to the world, and not just adjustment to society, becomes more central; and this facilitates further 'steps to an ecology of mind' (Bateson, 1972).
... Foucault's idea of power pushes us yet further, moving away from a focus on intentions, away from conflicts between competing (objective) interests, and away from individual actors and their capacity, instead focusing on discourse (Foucault, 1977). 2 For Foucault, power is omnipresent in all social actions from the micro to the macro; identities and interests are themselves a function of power relations. ...
... However, it is argued that transgression, in varying degrees, is a central organizing principle of the club. As Foucault (1977) points out, transgressions operate in ways that illustrate their own limits. Unlike a Hegelian dialectic, there is no clash of difference that dialectically produces something new, 'The limit and transgression depend on each other for whatever density of being they possess: a limit could not exist if it were absolutely uncrossable and, reciprocally, transgression would be pointless if it merely crossed a limit composed of illusions and shadows ' Foucault (1977, p. 34). ...
Chapter
This chapter explores how transgressions take place within the sex club. First, using a group sex encounter, it highlights the ways in which different forms of heteroeroticism can be understood as contesting the everyday routines of the club and broader notions of heteronormativity. Embedded within this section of the chapter is the notion of gaze and how this is a reversible process of looking and being looked at. The second part of this chapter focuses on sex between women. Whilst initially framing this as taking place within a heteropatriarchal gaze driven by forms of neo-liberal sexual entrepreneurialism, the chapter reflects on this approach by suggesting that it is within the limits of neo-liberalism where transgressive sexual practices might emerge. Finally, the chapter tentatively explores transgender experiences. In particular, it argues that transgression is not always a positive experience but can also result in sexual violence. The chapter concludes by arguing that where sexual practice exceeds economies of desire, it can be the source of intense sexual pleasure. At the same time, such transgressions can be physically and emotionally dangerous.
... However, it is argued that transgression, in varying degrees, is a central organizing principle of the club. As Foucault (1977) points out, transgressions operate in ways that illustrate their own limits. Unlike a Hegelian dialectic, there is no clash of difference that dialectically produces something new, 'The limit and transgression depend on each other for whatever density of being they possess: a limit could not exist if it were absolutely uncrossable and, reciprocally, transgression would be pointless if it merely crossed a limit composed of illusions and shadows ' Foucault (1977, p. 34). ...
Chapter
This chapter explores how dark rooms within sex clubs shape and configure men and masculinities. Using interviews with men who have used and visited dark rooms, this chapter explores the erotic subjectivity of men. The starting point for this chapter is that the norms and values of the club that are embedded in the erotic hierarchies that circulate in the rest of the club help to define what happens in the dark room. The chapter by examining respectable masculinities then explores the same-sex practices between men and consent. The chapter then argues that by leaving behind a sexual performance based on masculinity, men in the dark room demonstrate an alternative way of configuring masculinity and sexuality. It is suggested as the chapter progresses that new forms of erotic configurations are assembled in the dark room that point to the possibilities of a post-masculinity. The chapter concludes by highlighting that sex clubs do have the possibility to produce a radical subjectivity that may signal an epistemological break with existing approaches to men and masculinity.
... However, it is argued that transgression, in varying degrees, is a central organizing principle of the club. As Foucault (1977) points out, transgressions operate in ways that illustrate their own limits. Unlike a Hegelian dialectic, there is no clash of difference that dialectically produces something new, 'The limit and transgression depend on each other for whatever density of being they possess: a limit could not exist if it were absolutely uncrossable and, reciprocally, transgression would be pointless if it merely crossed a limit composed of illusions and shadows ' Foucault (1977, p. 34). ...
Chapter
This introductory chapter welcomes readers to the sex club. This chapter explains what the book is about and what readers should expect. The book then highlights the ethnographical research method that is used predominantly throughout the book. In so doing, it critically reflects on the limits of using ethnography to describe sexual encounters. The chapter then provides a synopsis of the chapters that are furnished with ethnographic encounters. Overall, this chapter provides an introductory insight into the sex clubs in the UK. The chapter concludes by describing the experience of the end of the night at a sex club and highlighting what we are yet to know about sex clubs.
... However, it is argued that transgression, in varying degrees, is a central organizing principle of the club. As Foucault (1977) points out, transgressions operate in ways that illustrate their own limits. Unlike a Hegelian dialectic, there is no clash of difference that dialectically produces something new, 'The limit and transgression depend on each other for whatever density of being they possess: a limit could not exist if it were absolutely uncrossable and, reciprocally, transgression would be pointless if it merely crossed a limit composed of illusions and shadows ' Foucault (1977, p. 34). ...
Chapter
This chapter begins by framing sex clubs as a place of secrecy and discretion. It then begins to define what a sex club is, a potted history of sex clubs and their position within the law and planning permissions. The chapter then provides a short discussion of methodology, before moving on to provide information on who visits sex clubs, what their sexual preferences are and how we might think about sex clubs geographically. A number of key findings emerge from this chapter that include sex clubs are not simply places for swingers but are part of a more diverse range of erotic practices; it highlights how the majority of women visiting the club are likely to identify as bisexual or bi-curious; clubs are geographically located and clustered; it provides an understanding of the racial dynamics of those who attend clubs and begins to map out sexual practices with geographical locations. In summary, this chapter provides important background information behind sex clubs.
... However, it is argued that transgression, in varying degrees, is a central organizing principle of the club. As Foucault (1977) points out, transgressions operate in ways that illustrate their own limits. Unlike a Hegelian dialectic, there is no clash of difference that dialectically produces something new, 'The limit and transgression depend on each other for whatever density of being they possess: a limit could not exist if it were absolutely uncrossable and, reciprocally, transgression would be pointless if it merely crossed a limit composed of illusions and shadows ' Foucault (1977, p. 34). ...
Chapter
The chapter focuses on the racialization of black men within sex clubs. It begins by recognizing the ways that clubs promote thematized events. Such events create a way of promoting fantasies that may lead to the satiating of desires. The chapter moves from discussing the commodification and fetishization of the body to considering how it is practiced within clubs. It discusses the notion of the ‘Black Bull’ and how black bodies become naturalized as through an appeal to animality. It is argued that this animality is historically located in the notions of black slavery. The chapter then explores how white women utilize this racialized desirability as a form of erotic consumption. The chapter argues that the role of women in black men’s slavery provides the contours for how they consume and commodify black bodies within the club. The chapter then moves on to discuss cuckolding and hotwifing and the implications this has for white masculinity. The chapter concludes by highlighting the role of racialized sex nights in clubs as a source of pleasure and agency for the men involved.
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The pandemic was an opportunity for authoritarian regimes to intensify militarism and cultivate fear, resulting in the disablement of the most vulnerable in society. Fear dissipates when basic freedoms are at stake. People who once were afraid have learned to transgress, “to step across”, because they just had enough of the Duterte regime’s deception. In light of this context, I argue, like Michel Foucault, that transgression can be a positive notion and not opposed to transcendence. In fact, it belongs to similar semantic cluster. An interruption can be viewed not as seeking attention, but rather as a cessation that aims for communion. Drawing from the lived experiences of persons with disabilities, I suggest a reversal of the negative perception of interruption to be incarnational, which can pave the way to a theology of transgression that is liberative.
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Geçmiş zamanlardaki toplumsal yapı (siyasi, sosyal, askeri ve ekonomik gibi) çocukların kavramsal ve bilişsel kapasiteleri için hem karmaşık hem soyut hem de zamansal olarak uzaktır. Dolayısıyla çocuk, geçmişin ayrıntılı dehlizlerinde dolaşırken hiçbir ipucu bulamadığı için kendi ve yakın çevresinin bakış açılarına göre geçmiş olayları anlamaya çalışmaktadır. Başka bir anlatımla çocuk, geçmişi kendi ve sosyal çevresinin değer, inanç ve kanaatlerine uygun olarak tahayyül edebilmektedir. Bu durum ilk bakışta zorlama bir düşünce tarzı olarak değerlendirilse de aslında çocuğun tarihi konuları günümüze getirerek anlama çabasının bir sonucu olmaktadır. Bunun ilk sakıncası tarihi konuları o günün şartlarına göre anlamaktansa bugünün koşullarına göre değerlendirmektir. İkinci olarak tarihi kişilikleri bugünün dünyasına getirerek onlarla sınırları bulanıklaştıran bir psikolojik yolculuğa çıkarak, olayları anlamaya çalışmaktır. Ancak temel eğitimde tarihin öncelikli amaçlarından biri, sosyal ilişkilerin o günün şartlarına göre kavranmasının sağlanmasıdır1. Babil, Mısır veya Anadolu’nun tarihi dönemlerdeki toplumsal yaşamını anlamaktaki güçlük, bu uygarlıkların zamansal uzaklıkları ile açıklanamayabilir. Elbette bugünün toplumsal yaşamı ile o dönemlerin yaşamı arasında “ideal, ilgi ve amaç” yönlerinden farklılıklar bulunmaktadır. Çocukların soyut olan bu farklılıkları temel eğitimde kavraması güçtür. Bu nedenle çocuğun tarihsel arka plan bilgisini kavraması somut yollarla olmalıdır. Bunu sağlamak için çocuğa, geçmişi bağlamına uygun olarak tercüme edebilmede yardım etmek gerekmektedir. Son zamanlarda temel eğitimde tarihi konuları o günün bağlamına göre anlama ve şimdicilik (presentism) tuzağından uzak durma konusuna dikkat çekilmektedir2. Bu kapsamda tarihi konuların öğretiminde şimdicilik düşünme eğiliminden uzak durmak ve tarihsel bakış açısı almak (historical perspective taking) ön plana çıkmaktadır. Gerek şimdicilik gerekse de tarihsel bakış açısı almak, geçmiş ve bugün arasındaki genel ilişkinin belirli bir öncülüne dayanmaktadır. Bununla birlikte şimdicilik, bugünün değerlerine sadık kalarak tarihi konuları anlamada sorunlu ve aşırı bir genelleştirme olarak tanımlanırken3, tarihsel bakış almak, tarihi konuları kendi değer, inanç ve düşünce sisteminde irdelemek anlamına gelmektedir4. Ancak buna rağmen tarihsel bakış açısı almak ile ilgili çalışma ve araştırmaların oldukça az olduğu belirlenmiştir5. Bu durum tarih anlamada bir sınırlık oluşturduğu için şimdicilik düşünme eğiliminden kaynaklı klişe genellemelerle baş edebilmek ve tarihsel öğrenmeyi sağlayabilmek amacıyla tarihi konuların öğretiminde tarihsel bakış açısı almak kavramanın kullanımı ve öncülü üzerinde düşünmeyi gerektirmektedir. Bu bağlamda çalışmanın amacı, şimdicilik ve tarihsel bakış açısı almak kavramlarının kavramsal çerçevelerini alanyazın bağlamında incelemektir.
Chapter
The project-practice of decolonising the university and the curriculum needs to continuously move forward on the path to emancipation, always linking theory-building and concept formation with pedagogy. The emancipatory politics of a decolonised curriculum depends on co-creation, relationality, and dialogue. This chapter introduces a combination of conjunctural and feminist-intersectional approaches from which to decolonise texts, theories, methods, and pedagogies, to surface the various forms of exclusion that manifest in academia. In this respect, the critical tool of intersectionality supports one of the central aims of decolonising the curriculum: to make what is being taught (the curriculum) and how it is being taught (the pedagogy) more responsive to the social injustices that are reproduced unconsciously through the curriculum and the pedagogy. I make a case for theoretical interruptions as ways to change teaching praxis. In this framework, feminist and postcolonial interruptions correspond to the first wave of the decolonisation of English studies, for they significantly dislocated the imperial, male-dominated boundaries of the traditional literary canon, theoretically interrupting English studies’ disciplinary self-concept and its object of study. We are currently in what might be called the second decolonising wave that will interrupt English studies’ pedagogy and its literary-political imagination.
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In this chapter, writing from the margins (Phillips & Bunda, Research Through, With, and as Storying. Routledge Focus, 2018), the researcher stories their auto-ethnographer’sAutoethnography individuated sensibility—their ethic of just-careethic of just-care—that informs their scholarship, research, advocacy, and activism.Activism Drawing on critical autoethnographic methods they story their lived experience of being, belonging, and becoming. Methodologically, they write from an onto-epistemological (Barad, Kvinder Køn og Forskning, 1–2, 25–54, 2012a, Differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, 23(3), 206–223, 2012b) third space (Soja, Thirdspace: Journeys to Los Angeles and other real-and-imagined places, Blackwell, 1996), from which their authorial voice has emerged to unashamedly talk back. Through the use of journaling, visual re-presentations, and poetryCreative Writing, they work in an onto-epistemological third space they have created. Their emerging habitus requires of them both a cognitive and non-cognitive response (Hyland, Mindfulness and learning: Celebrating the affective dimension of education. Springer, 2011) to intersex human rightsIntersexHuman Rights work. Their movement, within a western, patriarchal socio-political-medico landscape that subjugates knowledge/s and bodies, is a temporal and reflexively meditative response that engages the head (thinking), heart (feeling), and body (doing). Through this chapter, they share stories that give expression to their inward, outward, and forward iterative movement—that represents a movement away from exclusionary praxis ignorant of diversity and intersectionalityIntersectionality (sex characteristics, gender, sexuality/ies, class, race, ethnicity, spirituality …). The chapter has a liberatory message and is important for interdisciplinary human rights scholarship, research, advocacy, and activism.
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According to Mary Midgley, philosophy is like plumbing: like the invisible entrails of an elaborate plumbing system, philosophical ideas respond to basic needs that are fundamental to human life. Melioristic projects in philosophy attempt to fix or reroute this plumbing. An obstacle to melioristic projects is that the sheer familiarity of the underlying philosophical ideas renders the plumbing invisible. Philosophical genealogies aim to overcome this by looking at the origins of our current concepts. We discuss philosophical concepts developed in Indigenous cultures as a source of inspiration for melioristic genealogy. Examining the philosophical concepts of these communities is useful because it gives us a better idea of the range of ethical, political, and metaphysical approaches that exist in the world. Members of western societies do not get a clear view of this range, in part because living in large groups presents its own constraints and challenges, which limit philosophical options. We argue that features of Indigenous philosophies, such as egalitarianism and care for one's natural environment, are not inevitable byproducts of Native material conditions and lifestyles, but that they are deliberate forms of conceptual engineering. We propose that comparative philosophy is an integral part of the genealogical project.
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Edge Entanglements traverses the borderlands of the community "mental health" sector by "plugging in" to concepts offered by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari along with work from Mad Studies, postcolonial, and feminist scholars. Barlott and Setchell demonstrate what postqualitative inquiry can do, surfacing the transformative potential of freely-given relationships between psychiatrised people and allies in the community. Thinking with theory, the authors map the composition and generative processes of freely-given, ally relationships. Edge Entanglements surfaces how such relationships can unsettle constraints of the mental health sector and produce creative possibilities for psychiatrised people. Affectionately creating harmonies between theory and empirical "data," the authors sketch ally relationships in ways that move. Allyship is enacted through micropolitical processes of becoming-complicit: ongoing movement towards taking on the struggle of another as your own. Barlott and Setchell's work offers both conceptual and practical insights into postqualitative experimentation, relationship-oriented mental health practice, and citizen activism that unsettles disciplinary boundaries. Ongoing, disruptive movements on the margins of the mental health sector - such as freely-given relationships - offer opportunities to be otherwise. Edge Entanglements is for people whose lives and practices are precariously interconnected with the mental health sector and are interested in doing things differently. This book is likely to be useful for novice and established (applied) new material and/or posthumanist scholars interested in postqualitative, theory-driven research; health practitioners seeking alternative or radical approaches to their work; and people interested in citizen advocacy, activism, and community organising in/out of the mental health sector.
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Using Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality vis-à-vis Arjun Appadurai's "global ethnoscapes" as frames, I argue for a techno-cultural dimension which brought forth the phenomenon of the "dancing inmates," an argument against the charge of Filipino colonial mimicry of a Hollywood popular entertainment. Albeit the inmates' dance routines indeed depict Foucault's "docile bodies" in his analysis of the modern prison, as pointed out by critics, I am inclined to show how the internet mediation through social media networks awakened a culturally imbibed dance and musical character trait vis-à-vis the jolly cultural disposition of Filipinos. Thus, I view these characteristics as existential responses, hence, 'creative resilience,' to the inhuman incarcerating conditions of the prison life through using the art of dance with the aid of media technology. I argue on the role of the internet as the prisoners' avenue to the outside world that was strategically deprived of them as a form of punishment, and the role of the internet as their last frontier to freedom and to realize their human potentials.
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This chapter explores sociability, being one of the six ontological features of the human condition identified in Chap. 2, underpinning The Ontology of Well-Being Thesis (TOWT) defended throughout the book. Certainly, there are many positive aspects of sociability, such as engaging with others in reciprocal social relations, allowing for the pursuit and accomplishment of collective goals considered valuable and which enhance well-being. However, there are also negative aspects of sociability, explored in this chapter and in Chaps. 2, 4 and 7, reflecting how social relations are often oppressive and unjust for certain individuals and groups. The central claim defended here is that examining the character of these social relations, reveals conflicting interpretations of ‘self-consciousness’ derived from contrasting epistemological and normative understandings of ‘false consciousness’, and ‘self-knowledge’. These conflicting interpretations are also found in very different accounts of ‘radical politics’ concerning how well-being is best understood and promoted – notably for oppressed and socially excluded groups, such as disabled people, focussed on in this chapter. Subsequently, a number of other related issues are raised and explored here. That is, concerning the epistemological status of ‘subjective’ and ‘objective’ knowledge, including ‘self-knowledge’, and the co-productive development of social policy and welfare practiceWelfarepractice for groups defined as ‘vulnerable’, ‘disabled’, and in ‘need of care’.
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The aim of this article is to demonstrate that the school classroom constitutes a contact zone that promotes transculturation processes that configure the imaginary of English as the global dominant language. The school classroom is understood as a physical space, in which neoliberal educational policies are materialized from bilingualism, so it operates as a contact zone from which, in the implementation of bilingual education in the English language, students interact with political and economic imaginaries which are subjected to criteria of consumption, social competence and individualism. The methodology adopted is critical discourse analysis which is underpinned by Foucauldian conceptual tools. These allow, on the one hand, to unveil the dominant rationality in the policies and texts oriented to bilingual education in English in the contact zone of the school classroom, and on the other hand, to uncover the discursive practices which promote students’ transculturation processes in favour of this rationality. Keywords: Contact zone, English language, neoliberal rationality, school classroom, transculturation
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