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Potential of Paulownia elongata trees for swine waste utilization

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  • City of Durham

Abstract

A greenhouse experiment was done with vegetatively propagated trees to examine the influence of swine lagoon effluent on the growth and foliar nutrient content of the fast-growing hardwood species Paulownia elongata. Application of swine lagoon effluent promoted plant growth and was as beneficial as a complete chemical fertilizer applied at a similar nitrogen loading rate. Foliar concentrations of nitrogen were high, typically between 3.5% and 4.5%, when swine lagoon effluent was applied at a nitrogen loading rate equivalent to 205 or 409 kg/ha. Zinc and copper concentrations were also relatively high when plants received these swine lagoon effluent treatments (45 to 55 ppm and 17 to 23 ppm, respectively). Sufficient variation among P. elongata clones was revealed for growth parameters and foliar nutrient concentrations to anticipate a benefit from the selection of genotypes that are the most efficient for remediation of animal waste, i.e., high biomass production and foliar nutrient accumulation. The data show that P. elongata has potential for use as a swine waste utilization species.
... Paulownia leaves are rich in proteins and other nutrients making them a suitable forage crop for small ruminants (Mueller et al., 2001;Stewart et al., 2018). Fast -growing characteristics of Paulownia make it a desirable phytoremediation agent for rapid removal of swine waste, trace elements and heavy metals from contaminated soils (Bergmann et al., 1997;Tang et al., 1980;Madejon et al., 2014;Zhang et al., 2019). Nectariferous flowers of Paulownia species are a rich source of honey (Zhu et al., 1986;Yadav et al., 2013). ...
Article
The effects of plant tissue culture media with varying levels of growth regulators and carbon sources was tested on four explant types for organogenesis and plant regeneration in Paulownia elongata. Among the various treatments applied, the best response to adventitious shoot proliferation was observed when entire leaf or half leaf with attached petiole explants were cultured on either MS or B5 medium along with 25 μM thidiazuron, 10 μM indole acetic acid and 30 g/L maltose as a carbon source. Proliferated shoots were rooted within five days on a modified MS medium containing 5 μM indole butyric acid and plants were successfully acclimated and hardened for greenhouse transfer. A green fluorescent protein (gfp) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (npt II) gene was used to optimize genetic transformation protocols. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of half leaf with petiole explants produced transgenic plants using the media optimized for shoot proliferation and rooting. The insertion and expression of the GFP transgene was detected using PCR and RT-PCR.
... Swine lagoon effluents can also work as alternative or complement for fertilizers in Paulownia cultivations. A greenhouse experiment (Bergmann et al., 1997) was carried out with vegetative propagated trees of P. elongata, to examine the influence of swine waste effluent on the growth and foliar nutrient content. Plant growth was promoted with this treatment which and was as efficient as an equivalent fertilizer applied with the same nitrogen loading rate. ...
Chapter
Nowadays, biomass presents itself as a very viable alternative for the production of energy, both electrical and thermal, quickly recovering its role, both in the universe of domestic and industrial use. With growing concerns about climate change, it is becoming increasingly urgent to use environmentally harmful forms of energy production that contribute to the decarbonization of the economy. Biomass is capable of making a significant contribution to achieving this overall objective, since its use proves to be neutral from the point of view of the emission of carbon dioxide. However, the simple production of energy from biomass presents and encompasses a large number of variables, which justify its study for a better understanding. The aim that the editors intend to achieve with this book is to take an inclusive approach to all components that cover the use of biomass for energy production. At present, this form of energy production has been studied and used in an increasingly intensive way. However, in all the studies and research that can be found, what is verified is a traditional approach, based on an economy of a linear type, purely technical, both in terms of use and in terms of logistics. This book aims to address the issue of energy production from biomass in a circular economy perspective, in all its aspects, namely in all components of the supply chain, production organization, new technologies of use and reuse and revaluation of biomass forms from a circular economy perspective.
... Though its native range is almost entirely within southeastern China, Paulownia is often considered for planting in many areas of the world because some of the nine species within the genus are known to be valuable for many reasons. Examples include afforestation [1], agroforestry systems [2], honey production and medicinal uses [3], biomass production [4,5], heavy metal bioremediation [6], intercropping systems [7,8], livestock fodder production [9,10], livestock waste remediation [11], mine site reclamation [12], and wood production and solid wood products [1,13]. Royal paulownia [P. ...
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Paulownia elongata, Paulownia fortunei, and Paulownia × 'Henan 1' were grown for 21 years to determine growth and productivity potential of Paulownia in North Carolina, USA. One site included P. elongata only and was designed to test variability among clones within the species and the influence of application of dairy cow or poultry litter during the first six years. A second site was used to examine influence of species, clone, and propagation method. Species and clone within species frequently influenced tree performance, indicating that the planting of select clones could increase yields. By using the best approximately one-third of clones rather than all clones, tree survival could increase from 74% to 98%, and individual tree productivity as estimated by stem dry mass could increase by 21%. Trees of all three species grown from seed had lower survival, and seed-propagated trees that survived had inferior growth compared to trees of the same species grown from rooted shoot cuttings or microshoots from tissue culture. Application of dairy cow waste or poultry litter during the first six years did not influence tree survival or height to live crown, but early application of either animal waste resulted in taller trees compared to the control trees. Trees established with poultry litter applications had greater stump diameter, diameter breast height, stem volume, and stem dry mass than trees in the dairy cow waste or water-only control treatments.
... Furthermore, its root system has been reported to absorb nitrates, heavy metals and other contaminants (Woods, 2008) which could be a beneficial side effect of planting Paulownia on arable and livestock farms by preventing leaching and pollution from field operations. As per a US study by Bergmann et al. (1997), it was identified that the application of pig waste effluent on different hybrids of P. elongata had a growth effect on the leaves similar to a complete chemical fertiliser. ...
Thesis
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