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A variety of communication technologies are used in higher education classrooms, however, limited research has been conducted comparing the relative educational impact of these media. This paper explores four types of communication media: email, instant messaging, text messaging, and video chat. Comfort level, frequency of use, usefulness, reasons for using these media, and differences between peer-to-peer and peer-to-instructor interactions were examined. Over 90% of students were comfortable with email, instant messaging, and text messaging compared to a 50% comfort level using video chat. Email, instant messaging, and text messaging were used frequently and significantly more with peers compared to the instructor. Video chat was used infrequently with both peers and the instructor. Email was perceived as significantly more useful when used with the instructor vs. peers, while instant messaging was rated as significantly more useful when communicating with peers vs. the instructor. Text messaging was viewed as equally useful with peers and the instructor. Video chat was ranked as the least useful communication media with both peers and the instructor. Student comments described unique benefits and challenges for each type of communication medium.
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... However, in the past decade, live chat has become popular within university library services (see Matteson et al., 2011), and courses have adopted other, similar technology for support such as instant messaging and social media. Several studies have looked at instant messaging services within a higher education context such as chat rooms (Mtshali et al., 2015), Twitter (Hitchcock & Young, 2016;Luo et al., 2017), Facebook (Amador & Amador, 2017;Vivian, 2011), text messaging (Kay & Lauricella, 2015;Lauricella & Kay, 2013), video chat (Kay & Lauricella, 2015), and WhatsApp (Klein et al., 2018;Pimmer et al., 2018;Raiman et al., 2017;Robles et al., 2019;So, 2016). These studies found that instant messaging increases the number of student-to-student and student-to-teacher interactions (Klein et al. 2018;Mtshali et al., 2015), enhances sense of connection (Klien et al. 2016;McInnerney & Roberts, 2004), provides high levels of student satisfaction (e.g. ...
... However, in the past decade, live chat has become popular within university library services (see Matteson et al., 2011), and courses have adopted other, similar technology for support such as instant messaging and social media. Several studies have looked at instant messaging services within a higher education context such as chat rooms (Mtshali et al., 2015), Twitter (Hitchcock & Young, 2016;Luo et al., 2017), Facebook (Amador & Amador, 2017;Vivian, 2011), text messaging (Kay & Lauricella, 2015;Lauricella & Kay, 2013), video chat (Kay & Lauricella, 2015), and WhatsApp (Klein et al., 2018;Pimmer et al., 2018;Raiman et al., 2017;Robles et al., 2019;So, 2016). These studies found that instant messaging increases the number of student-to-student and student-to-teacher interactions (Klein et al. 2018;Mtshali et al., 2015), enhances sense of connection (Klien et al. 2016;McInnerney & Roberts, 2004), provides high levels of student satisfaction (e.g. ...
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