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Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea.

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A synopsis of adventive species of Cucujoidea (Coleoptera) in Canada is presented. Of the 548 Cucujoidea species recorded from Canada, 89 species in 48 genera and 12 families are reported as adventive, constituting 16.1% of the Canadian fauna of Cucujoidea. The majority of adventive species belong to the following families: Cryptophagidae (21 species), Latridiidae (20 species), Nitidulidae (13 species), Coccinellidae (11 species), Monotomidae (7 species), and Silvanidae (6 species). Most species originate from the western palaearctic. All adventive species are reviewed, and illustrated with color habitus photos. The male aedeagus for 15 difficult-to-distinguish species are illustrated with 30 line drawings. The Canadian distribution for each species is mapped and the general distribution in the USA is provided. Fifty-three new Canadian provincial and territorial records are provided. Two species, Acanthogethes fuscus (Olivier), Nitidulidae, and Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer, Latridiidae, are removed from the species list for Canada. General habitat information for each species is summarized.
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Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta)
recorded from Canada.
Part 3: Cucujoidea
Sofia–Moscow
2015
Synopsis of adventive
species of
Coleoptera (Insecta)
recorded from Canada.
Part 3: Cucujoidea
by
Jan Klimaszewski, David W. Langor,
H.E. James Hammond, Georges Pelletier, Yves Bousquet,
Caroline Bourdon, Reginald P. Webster, Lech Borowiec,
Geoff G.E. Scudder & Christopher G. Majka
Pensoft Publishers
Prof. Georgi Zlatarski 12, Soa 1700, Bulgaria
Fax: +359-2-870-42-82
info@pensoft.net
www.pensoft.net
S     C (I)
  C. P : C
by
Jan Klimaszewski1, David W. Langor2, H.E. James Hammond2, Georges Pelletier1,
Yves Bousquet3, Caroline Bourdon1, Reginald P. Webster4, Lech Borowiec5,
Geo G.E. Scudder6 & Christopher G. Majka7
1) Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, 1055 du P.E.P.S., P.O.
Box 10380, Stn. Sainte-Foy, Québec, Québec, G1V 4C7, Canada
2) Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, 5320-122 Street,
Edmonton, Alberta, T6H 3S5, Canada
3) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes,
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C6, Canada
4) 24 Mill Stream Dr., Charters Settlement, New Brunswick, E3C 1X1, Canada
5) University of Wroclaw, Department of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Taxonomy, Wroclaw, Poland
6) Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, 4200-6270 University Blvd., Vancouver,
British Columbia, V6T IZA, Canada
7) Natural History Resources, 6252 Jubilee Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 2G5, Canada
First published 2015
ISBN 978-954-642-771-7 (hardback)
Pensoft Series Faunistica No 113
ISSN 1312-0174
Printed in Bulgaria, March 2015
Contents
Introduction
7
Materials and methods
9
Discussion
12
List of recorded adventive species in Canada
16
Taxonomic review
20
Acknowledgements
100
References
100
Plates
109
Maps
129
Index of taxonomic names listed in the text
169
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 7
Introduction
is is the fourth volume in a series in which we treat the Canadian adventive species
of the insect order Coleoptera (Klimaszewski et al. 2010, 2012, 2013). e rst one
provided a quick overview of all recorded species of adventive Coleoptera in eastern
Canada, and the two subsequent volumes reviewed in detail the adventive species of
the families Carabidae and Staphylinidae, respectively, in Canada. is volume focuses
on the diverse superfamily Cucujoidea which contains 19 families and 548 species in
Canada (Bousquet et al. 2013). e most species-rich families are the Cryptophagidae,
Nitidulidae, Coccinellidae and Latridiidae.
Adventive species in the Cucujoidea span a wide variety of trophic roles includ-
ing fungivory (e.g., Cryptophagidae, Latridiidae, Erotylidae), necrophagy (e.g.,
some Nitidulidae), herbivory (e.g., Kateretidae), pollen-feeding (e.g., Nitidulidae –
Meligethinae), seed-feeding (e.g., Laemophloeidae), and predation (e.g., Coccinelli-
dae) (Downey and Arnett 1996). Many adventive members of this superfamily are
associated with stored food products and rotting materials (e.g., fruit, compost, grass,
hay) and are frequently synanthropic (Campbell et al. 1989). However, some species
are also found in a wide range of natural habitats, especially forests, where they are as-
sociated with dead wood (saproxylic) and litter (epigaeic) (Majka et al. 2009).
Many species of adventive Cucujoidea, especially in the families Cryptophagidae,
Silvanidae, and Laemophloeidae, are associated with stored food products (e.g., grains,
dried fruit) and, therefore, can be nuisance pests in households and cause economic
damage in granaries and other dried good storage and processing facilities (Campbell
et al. 1989). Many of these have been transported around the world in association with
grains and other dried foods.
Several species of predaceous Coccinellidae were intentionally introduced into
Canada as biocontrol agents targeting soft-bodied insects such as aphids, adelgids and
scales, and became established; some remain localized in distribution and others have
spread across all or most of the country. Two species, Coccinella septempunctata Lin-
naeus and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), are having ecological impacts by displacing na-
tive species of coccinellids in many parts of the country (Acorn 2007).
e Cucujoidea contain some families that are well-studied taxonomically (e.g.,
Coccinellidae) and some that are poorly known in North America. ree families that
have relatively large numbers of adventive species in Canada – Cryptophagidae (21
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
8
spp.), Latridiidae (20 spp.), and Nitidulidae (13 spp.) – have been poorly studied, both
in terms of taxonomy and distribution. Much eort is needed to develop a comprehen-
sive understanding of the diversity of these families in Canada (and North America) and
to establish a stable taxonomic foundation. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive and
consolidated knowledge of the 89 species of adventive Cucujoidea known from Canada
(Humble 1994, Bousquet et al. 2013), including diagnostic features, colour habitus
photos for all species, native range, Canadian distribution, new Canadian provincial
and territorial records, general distribution in the USA, early Canadian and North
American records, and habitat information. e present information on species of this
group is scattered across the literature and is dicult to access by non-specialists. We
hope that this contribution will provide an easy access to the latest information on this
group of adventive species in Canada and the USA, and will aid in their identication.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 9
Materials and methods
Structure and convention. is review is based largely on the published literature and
on information associated with identied specimens in mainly Canadian collections. e
arrangement of the species and classication follows that used by Bousquet et al. (2013).
We use the term “adventive species” to refer to those that arrived in Canada from
other countries, either through natural dispersal or through inadvertent or deliberate
human action (Wheeler and Hoebeke 2009). We do not include coverage of native
Canadian species that have been translocated to novel jurisdictions and habitats within
the country.
Images. We provide 91 colour habitus images of all adventive rove beetle species
reported from Canada. irty additional black and white drawings of genital struc-
tures are provided to aid with species identication of the dicult family Latridiidae.
e external images of adults were taken using an image processing system (Nikon
SMZ 1500 stereoscopic microscope; Nikon Digit-like Camera DXM 1200F or Nikon
D5200 digital photo camera), Adobe Photoshop and Helicon Focus software.
Distribution. Each species is cited with its currently known distribution in Cana-
da and the USA. Data for distribution maps (Canada only) were extracted from speci-
mens in collections, as well as from literature records. Geographic coordinates were
standardized using the NAD83 datum, and maps projected onto a Lambert Conic
Conformal using ESRI ArcMap version 10 for Windows. e following abbreviations
are used in the text for Canadian provinces and territories:
AB – Alberta, BC – British Columbia, LB – Labrador, MB – Manitoba, NB– New
Brunswick, NF – Newfoundland (island), NS – Nova Scotia, NT – Northwest Ter-
ritories, NU – Nunavut, ON – Ontario, PE – Prince Edward Island, QC – Quebec,
SK – Saskatchewan, YT – Yukon Territory.
USA state abbreviations follow those of the US Postal Service.
Collection codens. e following collections contained specimens of adventive Cucu-
joidea from Canada, and specimen data were used to delimit distribution:
ACU Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
10
ACNL Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador,
Canada
ACNS Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada
ACPE Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island,
Canada
AFC Atlantic Forestry Centre (Canadian Forest Service), Fredericton, New
Brunswick, Canada
CFCB Canadian Forest Service, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador,
Canada
CBU Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
CIQ Collection d’Insectes de Québec, Québec, Québec, Canada
CIUL Collection d’Insectes de l’Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada
CMN Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
CMNH Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
CNCI Canadian National Collection of Insects, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
DAL Dalhousie University Collection, Halifax, New Brunswick, Canada
DEBU University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
DHWC David H. Webster Collection, Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada
DJLC David J. Larson Collection, Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada
EMPC Edward M. Pike Collection, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
JAC John Acorn Collection and Database, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
JCC Joyce Cook Collection, North Augusta, Ontario, Canada
JOC Jerey Ogden Collection, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada
LEMQ Lyman Entomological Museum, Ste. Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada
LFC Laurentian Forestry Centre (Canadian Forest Service), Quebec, Canada
MUN Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and
Labrador, Canada (on loan to David Langor, Edmonton)
MZH Museum of Zoology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
NBM New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
NOFC Northern Forestry Centre (Canadian Forest Service), Edmonton, Alberta,
Canada
NSAC Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Bible Hill, Nova Scotia, Canada
NSMC Nova Scotia Museum, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
NSNR Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources, Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia,
Canada
PFC Pacic Forestry Centre (Canadian Forest Service) Victoria, British Columbia,
Canada
ROM Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
RSM Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
RWC Reginald Webster Collection, Charters Settlement, New Brunswick, Canada
STFX St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 11
UASM University of Alberta Strickland Museum, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
UBC University of British Columbia, George J. Spencer Entomological Museum,
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
UMAN University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
UNB University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
UPEI University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island,
Canada
USNM National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC, USA
Faunal composition of adventive Cucujoidea (number of species in brackets)
89 recorded species in 48 genera and 12 families (two additional species are herein re-
moved from the Canadian list):
EROTYLIDAE [1]: Cryptophilus (1); MONOTOMIDAE [7]: Rhizophagus (1), Mono-
toma (6); CRYPTOPHAGIDAE [21]: Cryptophagus (10), Henoticus (1), Pteryngium
(1), Telmatophilus (1), Atomaria (7), Ephistemus (1); SILVANIDAE [6]: Ahasverus (1),
Nausibius (1), Oryzaephilus (2), Silvanoprus (1), Silvanus (1); LAEMOPHLOEIDAE
[3]: Cryptolestes (3); KATERETIDAE [2]: Brachypterolus (1); Brachypterus (1); NITID-
ULIDAE [13]: Carpophilus (4), Brassicogethes (1), Genisthogethes (1), Meligethes (1);
Aethina (1), Nitidula (2), Omosita (2), Soronia (1); CERYLONIDAE [1]: Murmidius
(1); ENDOMYCHIDAE [2]: Symbiotes (1), Mycetaea (1); COCCINELLIDAE [11]:
Rhyzobius (1), Adalia (1), Aphidecta (1), Coccinella (2), Harmonia (1), Hippodamia
(1), Propylaea (1), Scymnus (3); CORYLOPHIDAE [2]: Orthoperus (1), Sericoderus
(1); LATRIDIIDAE [20]: Adistemia (1), Cartodere (3), Dienerella (5), Enicmus (1),
Latridius (2), Stephostethus (1), es (1), Corticaria (5), Cortinicara (1).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
12
Discussion
Although the 19 families contained in the superfamily Cucujoidea in Canada represent
only ~7.5% of beetle species in Canada (Bousquet et al. 2013), these species corpo-
rately represent a wide range of trophic roles (e.g., herbivory, necrophagy, mycophagy,
predatory, pollen-feeding) and habitats. Bousquet et al. (2013) recorded 90 adventive
species in Canada but did not include the establishment of Aphidecta obliterata (Lin-
naeus) in BC (Humble 1994). We removed two species, Acanthogethes fuscus (Olivier)
(Nitidulidae), and Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae) from the species
list for Canada because of lack of evidence of an established population and misiden-
tication. is leaves 89 purported adventive species in Canada, representing 16.1%
of the total Canadian Cucujoidea fauna. In comparison, 9.4% of the Staphylinidae are
adventive in Canada (Klimaszewski et al. 2013) and 5.7% of the Carabidae (Klimasze-
wski et al. 2012). Several small families have no known adventive species in Canada
(e.g., Cucujidae, Phalacridae), and others have a high percentage of adventive species,
e.g., Silvanidae (37.5% of Canadian species are adventive), Latridiidae (35.6%), and
Cryptophagidae (31.3%) (Table 1).
e aforementioned three families with the highest percent of adventive species
among the Cucujoidea are similar in that they contain many non-native species that
are associated with grains and other dried food products (at least 27 species). Alto-
gether, in the Cucujoidea there are no less than 37 adventive species that are associ-
ated with dried stored food products. Such stored product species, many of which are
pests, have been transported around the world for centuries due to human commerce
(Campbell et al. 1989). Of the 37 adventive Cucujoidea species in Canada associated
with stored food products, 28 have also been inadvertently introduced to other regions
of the world in addition to the Nearctic, and many now have cosmopolitan distribu-
tions. ere are also many other adventive beetle species associated with stored food
products in Canada in other beetle families, e.g., Tenebrionidae and Dermestidae, and
many of those also have cosmopolitan distributions.
e adventive Cucujoidea in Canada consists mostly of species that were inad-
vertently introduced onto our shores, but there are also seven species of predaceous
Coccinellidae that were intentionally introduced for the purposes of biocontrol of
economically important aphids and adelgids in forestry and agriculture (McLeod et
al. 1962, Acorn 2007). ere have also been attempted introductions of other lady-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 13
bird beetle species, e.g., Scymnus pumilio (Weise), that were unsuccessful (McLeod et
al. 1962). e impact of these biocontrol agents on the target species is dicult to
assess, but there seems to be little evidence of signicant and lasting success in reduc-
ing the populations of target species and their damage below an economic threshold.
e unfortunate outcome of the introduction of generalist predators is that there are
sometimes non-target impacts on native fauna. Two of these introduced coccinellid
species, C. septempunctata and H. axyridis, have been demonstrated to displace native
ladybird beetles (Acorn 2007), therefore highlighting the ecological impacts of adven-
tive species. e ecological impacts of other adventive Cucujoidea are unexplored.
e diversity of adventive Cucujoidea in Canada varies greatly by geographic ju-
risdictions (Table 1). e Atlantic Provinces have the highest number of species (66),
followed by Quebec (65), Ontario (64), and British Columbia (55), a diversity pattern
also evident for Staphylinidae and Carabidae (Klimaszewski et al. 2012, 2013). is
general pattern reects that ports in these regions and provinces have had a long his-
tory of trade, particularly with Europe and Asia. As Atlantic Canada has a relatively
low diversity of native beetles and a high number of adventive species, the percent
of fauna represented by non-native Cucujoidea species is highest there, especially in
Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia (Table 1). is same pattern is
evident for Staphylinidae and Carabidae (Klimaszewski et al. 2012, 2013). e north-
ern territories and prairie provinces are the least invaded regions of the country.
It is dicult to determine when each adventive species arrived in Canada and
became established, especially before the 1920s when insect survey and collection
eorts in Canada were minimal. e date of rst detection of a species in Cana-
da only roughly approximates the true time of entry and establishment. However,
the collections made by entomologists in the 19th century help to categorize some
adventive species as old versus recent introductions. As well, palaeoentomological
evidence generated through excavation of an old latrine site at Ferryland in south-
eastern NF, which dates back to the early 17th century (Bain and Prévost 2010),
provides evidence that some species were introduced very early (before 1620) in the
human colonization of Canada, e.g. Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Silvanidae), Lat-
ridius minutus (Latridiidae), and Mycetaea subterranea (Endomychidae), all of which
are associated with stored food products. Two carrion-associated species, Nitidula
rupes (Nitidulidae) and Omosita discoidea (Nitidulidae), were established in north-
ern Canada by 1819-1825 when they were collected by a naturalist during Sir John
Franklins rst expedition in northern Canada (Kirby 1937). e collection locality,
listed as 65˚ N, when overlaid on top of Franklin’s route, corresponds to a locality
in the Northwest Territories between 110˚W to 114˚W. Seven species were rst col-
lected in Canada from 1850-1874, 17 from 1875-1899, 17 from 1900-1924, 20
from 1925-1949, six from 1951-1974, seven from 1975-1999 and four thus far in
the 21st century. e rate of rst discovery of species peaked in the second quarter
of the 20th century and has declined since then.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
14
e site of rst detection of an adventive species in Canada is presumed to be in
the vicinity of the site of introduction and establishment. Almost half of the adventive
Cucujoidea that were inadvertently introduced into Canada were detected in close
proximity to the St. Lawrence River (28 spp.), near the shores of Lake Ontario (12
spp.), and in southern Ontario, near Lake Erie (4 spp.). Along the St. Lawrence River,
the highest concentrations of rst records were in Quebec City and vicinity (10 spp.),
Montreal and vicinity (8 spp.), and Ottawa and vicinity (7 spp.). Five species were rst
detected in southeastern Newfoundland, near early settlements at St. Johns and Ferry-
land. As well, six species associated with stored grains were rst detected in Winnipeg,
an important crossroads for the movement of grain from the prairies. Interestingly, no
species were rst detected in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia and only two
species were rst detected in the Victoria area, unlike for Staphylinidae and Carabidae
where many species were introduced through southwestern British Columbia.
As with Staphylinidae, Carabidae, and adventive insects on woody plants (Langor
et al. 2008, Klimaszewski et al. 2012, 2013), most adventive Cucujoidea originated in
the Palaearctic and arrived in North America most likely through trade with European
nations. Nausibius clavicornis (Silvanidae) has a Neotropical origin, Aethina tumida
(Nitidulidae) originates in sub-Saharan Africa, and Cartodere bifasciata (Latridiidae) is
Australian, although it is believed to have entered Canada via Europe. It is nearly im-
possible to ascertain which species were directly introduced into Canada from ports of
origin and which were rst established in the United States and then spread, by natural
or human-assisted dispersal, to Canada. Of the 83 species inadvertently introduced
into Canada, about 36 (43%) were rst collected in the USA. Many of these may have
arrived in Canada indirectly through spread from the south. In comparison, 67% of
adventive carabids and 44% of adventive staphylinids were rst collected in the USA
and may have spread to Canada from there (Klimaszewski et al. 2012, 2013). Un-
doubtedly, some adventive species rst arriving in Canada have subsequently spread to
the USA. is underscores the continued need for a Canada-USA-Mexico collabora-
tion for reducing adventive species introductions in North America and for combating
spread and implementing management solutions for impactful species.
Finally, it is clear that there are taxonomic impediments to fully understanding the
true extent of colonization of Canada by non-native beetle species. While the state of
knowledge for well-known and conspicuous families such as Coccinellidae is excellent,
some families containing large numbers of physically small species are inadequately
studied taxonomically and distribution is poorly known. e state of knowledge of
the diversity of Latridiidae and Cryptophagidae in Canada is especially poor, for both
native and purportedly adventive species. ere are many undescribed species, and
modern keys to species are largely non-existent. Some species currently listed as ad-
ventive in Canada may in fact be Holarctic. Similarly, there may be yet-unidentied
adventive species in our fauna. ese two families need intensive taxonomic attention
in Canada and the USA.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 15
Table 1. Summary of the native and adventive Cucujoidea beetle fauna of Canada by province and territory.
Family Percent of fauna adventive [no. adventive spp./total no. species]
Total YT NT NU BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE LB NF
Byturidae 0%
[0/1] 0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/1]
Sphindidae 0%
[0/6] ---0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/2] -0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/5]
0%
[0/5]
0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/3] - - -
Biphyllidae 0%
[0/1] -------0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1] - - -
Erotylidae 3.6%
[1/28] ---0%
[0/5]
0%
[0/6]
0%
[0/5]
0%
[0/9]
5.0%
[1/20]
5.3%
[1/19]
0%
[0/10]
0%
[0/7]
0%
[0/2] - -
Monotomidae 25.9%
[7/27]
0%
[0/1] - - 28.6%
[4/14]
37.5%
[3/8]
62.5%
[5/8]
25.0%
[1/4]
38.9%
[7/18]
38.5%
[5/13]
33.3%
[3/9]
37.5%
[3/8]
50.0%
[1/2] -60.0%
[3/5]
Cryptophagidae 31.3%
21/67
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/4]
100%
[1/1]
23.4%
[11/47]
35.0%
[7/20]
37.5%
[9/24]
37.5%
[6/16]
50.0%
[12/24]
37.5%
[12/32]
57.1%
[12/21]
42.3%
[11/26]
42.9%
[3/7]
25.0%
[2/8]
26.7%
[4/15]
Silvanidae 37.5%
6/16 -50.0%
[1/2] -57.1%
[4/7]
50.0%
[3/6]
60.0%
[3/5]
50.0%
[4/8]
38.5%
[5/13]
42.9%
[6/14]
57.1%
[4/7]
62.5%
[5/8]
100%
[2/2] -66.7%
[2/3]
Cucujidae 0%
[0/8]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/6]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1]
Passandridae 0%
[0/1] -------0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/1] -----
Phalacridae 0%
[0/8] ---0%
[0/3] -0%
[0/5]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/2]
Laemophloeidae 23.1%
[3/13] ---75.0%
[3/4]
100%
[2/2]
50.0%
[3/6]
42.9%
[3/7]
33.3%
[3/9]
27.3%
[3/11]
16.7%
[1/6]
37.5%
[3/8]
50.0%
[1/2] -50%
[1/2]
Kateretidae 25.0%
[2/8]
0%
[0/1]
50.0%
[1/2] -20.0%
[1/5]
50.0%
[2/4]
50.0%
[2/4]
66.7%
[2/3]
33.3%
[2/6]
33.3%
[2/6]
40.0%
[2/5]
66.7%
[2/3]
100%
[1/1] -50.0%
[2/4]
Nitidulidae 14.1%
[14/99]
7.7%
[1/13]
25.0%
[2/8]
0%
[0/1]
14.8%
[9/61]
9.3%
[4/43]
18.9%
[7/37]
15.2%
[7/46]
9.6%
[8/63]
13.6%
[9/66]
14.6%
[7/48]
17.9%
[7/39]
23.1%
[3/13]
50.0%
[1/2]
40.0%
[4/10]
Botherideridae 0%
[0/4] ---0%
[0/2] ---0%
[0/2] ------
Cerylonidae 12.5%
[1/8] -0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/1]
16.7%
[1/6]
0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/3]
0%
[0/1] -0%
[0/2]
Endomychidae 12.5%
[2/16] -0%
[0/1] -14.3%
[1/7]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/2]
0%
[0/5]
18.2%
[2/11]
11.1%
[1/9]
0%
[0/6]
16.7%
[1/6]
50.0%
[1/2] -50.0%
[1/2]
Coccinellidae 6.8%
[11/162]
3.3%
[1/30]
5.8%
[2/35]
0%
[0/2]
9.5%
[9/95]
4.8%
[4/83]
5.0%
[4/80]
6.1%
[4/66]
8.3%
[7/84]
9.8%
[8/82]
14.3%
[6/42]
16.3%
[7/43]
28.6%
[6/21]
27.2%
[3/11]
29.4%
[5/17]
Corylophidae 12.5%
[2/16]
0%
[0/1]
0%
[0/2] -28.6%
[2/7]
0%
[0/4]
0%
[0/5]
25.0%
[1/4]
10.0%
[1/10]
10.0%
[1/10]
0%
[0/4]
12.5%
[1/8]
0%
[0/1] - -
Latridiidae 35.6%
[21/59]
16.7%
[1/6]
0%
[0/6] -31.4%
[11/35]
50.0%
[7/14]
43.5%
[10/23]
57.1%
[12/21]
55.6%
[15/27]
50.0%
[17/34]
50.0%
[13/26]
56.7%
[17/30]
56.3%
[9/16]
75.0%
[3/4]
57.1%
[8/14]
CUCUJOIDEA 16.4%
[90/548]
5.4%
[3/56]
9.5%
[6/63]
25.0%
[1/4]
18.1%
[55/304]
16.1%
[32/199]
20.6%
[43/209]
19.9%
[40/201]
20.8%
[64/308]
20.7%
[65/314]
24.1%
[48/199]
28.9%
[57/197]
37.0%
[27/73]
33.3%
[9/27]
38.5%
[30/78]
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
16
List of recorded adventive species in Canada
Family EROTYLIDAE Latreille
Subfamily C Casey
Cryptophilus integer (Heer)
Family MONOTOMIDAE Laporte
Subfamily R Redtenbacher
Rhizophagus parallelocollis Gyllenhal
Subfamily M Laporte
Monotoma bicolor A. Villa & G.B. Villa
Monotoma longicollis (Gyllenhal)
Monotoma picipes Herbst
Monotoma spinicollis Aubé
Monotoma quadrifoveolata Aubé
Monotoma testacea Motschulsky
Family CRYPTOPHAGIDAE Kirby
Subfamily C Kirby
Cryptophagus cellaris (Scopoli)
Cryptophagus distinguendus Sturm
Cryptophagus fallax Balfour–Browne
Cryptophagus laticollis Lucas
Cryptophagus obsoletus Reitter
Cryptophagus pilosus Gyllenhal
Cryptophagus saginatus Sturm
Cryptophagus scanicus (Linnaeus)
Cryptophagus scutellatus Newman
Cryptophagus subfumatus Kraatz
Henoticus serratus (Gyllenhal)
Pteryngium crenatum (Gyllenhal)
Telmatophilus typhae (Fallén)
Subfamily A LeConte
Atomaria apicalis Erichson
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 17
Atomaria fuscata Schönherr
Atomaria lederi Johnson
Atomaria lewisi Reitter
Atomaria pusilla (Paykull)
Atomaria testacea Stephens
Atomaria atrata Reitter
Ephistemus globulus (Paykull)
Family SILVANIDAE Kirby
Subfamily S Kirby
Ahasverus advena (Waltl)
Nausibius clavicornis (Kugelann)
Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel)
Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Linnaeus)
Silvanoprus angusticollis (Reitter)
Silvanus bidentatus (Fabricius)
Family LAEMOPHLOEIDAE Ganglbauer
Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens)
Cryptolestes pusillus (Schönherr)
Cryptolestes turcicus (Grouvelle)
Family KATERETIDAE Kirby
Brachypterolus pulicarius (Linnaeus)
Brachypterus urticae (Fabricius)
Family NITIDULIDAE Latreille
Subfamily C Erichson
Carpophilus hemipterus (Linnaeus)
Carpophilus dimidiatus (Fabricius)
Carpophilus mutilatus Erichson
Carpophilus marginellus Motschulsky
Subfamily M C.G. omson
Acanthogethes fuscus (Olivier)
Brassicogethes viridescens (Fabricius)
Genisthogethes carinulatus (Förster)
Meligethes atratus (Olivier)
Subfamily N Latreille
Aethina tumida Murray
Nitidula carnaria (Schaller)
Nitidula rupes (Linnaeus)
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
18
Omosita colon (Linnaeus)
Omosita discoidea (Fabricius)
Soronia grisea (Linnaeus)
Family CERYLONIDAE Billberg
Subfamily M Jacquelin du Val
Murmidius ovalis (Beck)
Family ENDOMYCHIDAE Leach
Subfamily A Strohecker
Symbiotes gibberosus (Lucas)
Subfamily M Jacquelin du Val
Mycetaea subterranea (Fabricius)
Family COCCINELLIDAE Latreille
Subfamily C Latreille
Rhyzobius lophanthae (Blaisdell)
Adalia bipunctata (Linnaeus)
Aphidecta obliterata (Linnaeus)
Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus
Coccinella undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Linnaeus
Harmonia axyridis (Pallas)
Hippodamia variegata (Goeze)
Propylaea quatuordecimpunctata (Linnaeus)
Subfamily S Mulsant
Scymnus impexus Mulsant
Scymnus suturalis unberg
Stethorus punctillum Weise
Family CORYLOPHIDAE LeConte
Subfamily C LeConte
Orthoperus atomus (Gyllenhal)
Sericoderus lateralis (Gyllenhal)
Family LATRIDIIDAE Erichson
Subfamily L Erichson
Adistemia watsoni (Wollaston)
Cartodere bifasciata (Reitter)
Cartodere constricta (Gyllenhal)
Cartodere nodifer (Westwood)
Dienerella argus (Reitter)
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 19
Dienerella costulata (Reitter)
Dienerella liformis (Gyllenhal)
Dienerella lum (Aubé)
Dienerella rucollis (Marsham)
Enicmus histrio Joy & Tomlin
Latridius hirtus Gyllenhal
Latridius minutus (Linnaeus)
Stephostethus lardarius (DeGeer)
Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer
es bergrothi (Reitter)
Subfamily C Curtis
Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal)
Corticaria impressa (Olivier)
Corticaria pubescens (Gyllenhal)
Corticaria saginata Mannerheim
Corticaria serrata (Paykull)
Cortinicara gibbosa (Herbst)
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
20
Taxonomic review
Family EROTYLIDAE Latreille, 1802 [the pleasing fungus beetles; including Lan-
guriinae, Crotch 1873, the lizard beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0–10 mm, body shape narrowly elongate and parallel-sided,
moderately attened or slightly convex, usually glabrous and glossy, colour variable,
dark or light brown, blue, red or green, some with dark or light spots; head and pro-
notum nearly equal in width; head elongate and retracted into thorax, usually with
stridulatory le; eyes well developed and coarsely faceted; antennal club with three
antennomeres, antennal insertions concealed in dorsal view; mandible without a deep
cavity; pronotum with lateral margins simple, sometimes slightly crenulate, base of the
disc sometimes with two small depressions; elytra often elongate and with well-dened
epipleura and punctation random or seriate; abdomen with ve freely articulate ven-
trites, basal ventrite equal in length to remaining ventrites; procoxae globose, their
cavities open or closed; mesocoxal cavities closed laterally; tarsal formula 5-5-5.
Subfamily CRYPTOPHILINAE Casey
1. Cryptophilus integer (Heer)
(Fig. 1, Map 1)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.0 mm, narrowly oval, reddish-brown with dark brown
legs; head with prominent eyes; antennae with elongate club, segments subquadrate to
slightly transverse; pronotum strongly transverse, evenly arcuate laterally and slightly
explanate, punctation large; elytra narrowly oval, with distinct striae except for scutel-
lar region, intervals at, with dense and decumbent pubescence.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in New Zealand (Downie and Arnett 1996, Kli-
maszewski et al. 2010).
Distribution in Canada. ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 21
Distribution in USA. AL, CA, FL, IN, LA, MS, PA, SC, TX (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Chatham, ON in 1928; Hemmingford, QC in 1933 (LFC).
Klimaszewski et al. (2010) reported a 1913 record from an unspecied Canadian locality.
First North American records. See above.
Habitat data. In Europe, this species is associated with decaying plant material (e.g.,
compost piles) where it is fungivorous (Ruta et al. 2011).
Family MONOTOMIDAE Laporte, 1840 [the root-eating beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5–4.5 mm, slender, elongate, parallel-sided, sub-cylindrical
to attened, pubescence short and sparse or body glabrous, colour dull; head progna-
thous, usually constricted posteriorly, antennae with 10 antennomeres, and 1-2-ar-
ticled club, labrum indistinct; pronotum subquadrate to elongate, with smooth or
denticulate lateral margins; elytra truncate exposing tip of abdomen; abdomen with
ve visible sternites; procoxae usually globular and usually with hidden trochanters
(exception Rhizophagus), their cavities closed behind; mesocoxae narrowly to widely
separated, their cavities open laterally; tarsal formula usually 5-5-5 in females and 5-5-
4 in males, although in a few species 5-5-5 or 4-4-4 in both sexes.
Subfamily RHIZOPHAGINAE Redtenbacher
2. Rhizophagus parallelocollis Gyllenhal
(Fig. 2, Map 2)
Diagnosis. Body subparallel, dark-reddish brown, glossy, length 3.0–4.3 mm;
head with antennal groove on each side lateroventrally, tempora long; antenna
appearing 10-segmented, club rounded apically and appearing one-segmented;
antennomere III as long as antennomeres IV, V and VI combined; pronotum elon-
gate with markedly impressed microsculpture, anterior angles of pronotum re-
exed and somewhat protruded anteriorly; base of elytron without extra punctures
at level of second interval; fore-coxal cavities transverse; metacoxal bead thickened
and usually somewhat interrupted at level of trochanter; last abdominal ventrite
without depression.
Native range. Palaearctic (Bousquet 1990b, Jelinek 2007b).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
22
Distribution in Canada. BC, NF, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet 1990b, Majka and Bous-
quet 2010, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. DC, IN, KY, MA, ME, NJ, NY, PA, RI, WA (Bousquet 1990b,
Majka and Bousquet 2010).
First Canadian records. Toronto, ON in 1897; Montreal, QC in 1904; Creston, BC
in 1938; and Waverley, NS in 1947 (Bousquet 1990b).
First North American records. New Bedford, MA in 1895 (Bousquet 1990b).
Habitat data. is species is recorded from subcortical environments in Abies balsamea
L. Mill., and Picea glauca (Moench) Voss (Bousquet 1990b, Majka and Bousquet
2010). In Europe, it is known as the “graveyard beetle” because it is frequently found
in graves, swarming on corpses in cons where it is associated with dipteran larvae on
which it may feed. e species is also found in fungi, soil, mammal nests, mould, plant
refuse, old bones, and at sap (Bousquet 1990b, Majka and Bousquet 2010).
Subfamily MONOTOMINAE Laporte
3. Monotoma bicolor A. Villa & G.B. Villa
(Fig. 3, Map 3)
Diagnosis. Body narrowly oval, dark brown with reddish tinge, not glossy, length
1.9–2.5 mm, head and pronotum reddish-brown to piceous, distinctly darker than
elytra, body dorsally covered with moderately dense setae; dorsum of head and prono-
tum with coarse, subcontiguous punctures; head without antennal grooves and with-
out longitudinal impressions on frons, temples relatively long, 0.5–0.8 times length
of longitudinal diameter of eye; antennomere III as long as antennomere II, antennal
club 2-segmented; disc of pronotum with two shallow foveae in posterior half, sides
more or less parallel to slightly rounded posteriorly, anterior angles roundly protrud-
ing; elytra with rows of paired punctures; fore-coxal cavities rounded; rst abdominal
ventrite longer than remaining ventrites, without coxal lines.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Middle East, Australia, and New Zealand
(Bousquet and Laplante 2000, Jelinek 2007b).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet and Laplante 2000, Maj-
ka and Bousquet 2010, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 23
Distribution in USA. AR, AZ, CA, DC, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, ME, MI, NC, NH,
NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, TN, VT, WI (Majka and Bousquet 2010).
First Canadian records. Montreal, QC in 1919; Salmon Arm and Vancouver, BC in
1932; Vineland Station, ON in 1937; and Drinkwater, SK in 1953 (Bousquet and
Laplante 2000).
First North American records. New York, NY before 1855 (LeConte 1855, as M.
parallelum LeConte).
Habitat data. is species is primarily found in decaying vegetable matter such as grass
piles and barnyard litter (Peacock 1977, Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
4. Monotoma longicollis (Gyllenhal)
(Fig. 4, Map 4)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.4–1.9 mm, body dorsally covered with moderately dense se-
tae; head without antennal grooves and without longitudinal impressions on frons, tem-
ples relatively short, 0.3–0.4 times length of longitudinal diameter of eye, head dorsally
and pronotum with shallow punctures, irregularly spaced, not contiguous; antennal club
2-segmented; pronotum elongate, distinctly wider anteriorly, anterior angles protruding,
the extremity rounded or blunt; elytra with rows of paired punctures; fore-coxal cavities
rounded; rst abdominal ventrite longer than remaining ventrites, without coxal lines.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in sub-Saharan Africa and Australia (Jelinek 2007b).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, NB, NF, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet and Laplante
2000, Majka and Bousquet 2010, Bousquet et al. 2013). is constitutes the rst report
of this species from BC: 10 km south of Radium, 1987 (CNCI); Gabriola, 1988 (CNCI).
Distribution in USA. AL, AZ, CT, DC, FL, IL, IN, MA, ME, MN, MO, NC, NH,
NV, NY, OK, VT, WI (Bousquet and Laplante 2000, Majka and Bousquet 2010).
First Canadian records. Montebello, QC in 1937 (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First North American records. DC before 1879 (Horn 1879).
Habitat data. is species was found in grass piles and stored wheat (Bousquet and
Laplante 2000).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
24
5. Monotoma picipes Herbst
(Fig. 5, Map 5)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.9–2.5 mm, body dorsally covered with moderately dense
setae; head without antennal grooves, with pair of deep longitudinal impressions
on frons, temples relatively short, 0.3–0.4 times length of longitudinal diameter
of eye; antennal club 2-segmented; dorsal part of head and pronotum with coarse,
subcontiguous punctures; pronotum wider near posterior angles, anterior angles
protruding and posterior ones slightly angulate; elytra with rows of paired punc-
tures; fore-coxal cavities rounded; rst abdominal ventrite longer than remaining
ventrites, without coxal lines.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek 2007b); now cosmopolitan (Nikitsky 1986).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet
and Laplante 2000, Majka and Bousquet 2010, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, FL, IL, IN, KY, LA, MA, ME, MI,
MN, MO, NH, NM, NV, NY, OK, PA, TN, TX, VA, VT, WA, WI (Bousquet and
Laplante 2000, Majka and Bousquet 2010).
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1911; Montreal, QC in 1915 (CIUL);
Prince Edward County, ON in 1917; French Lake, NB in 1928; and Royal Oak, BC
in 1953 (UBC) (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First North American records. Boston, MA between 1675-1740 (Bain and King 2011).
Habitat data. In North America, this species was found in decaying vegetable matter,
under bark of pine logs, in moss, seaweed, and occasionally occurs in association with
ants (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
6. Monotoma spinicollis Aubé
(Fig. 6, Map 6)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0–2.6 mm, body dorsally covered with moderately dense
and strong setae; head without antennal grooves and without longitudinal impres-
sions on frons, temples moderately long, 0.5–0.6 times length of longitudinal diameter
of eye; antennal club 2-segmented; dorsal part of head and pronotum with coarse,
subcontiguous punctures; pronotum widest just behind middle, without impressions
on disc, sides markedly rounded, anterior angles acutely protruding; elytra with rows
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 25
of paired punctures; fore-coxal cavities rounded; rst abdominal ventrite longer than
remaining ventrites, without coxal lines and without median depression in the male.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek 2007b).
Distribution in Canada. ON, SK (Bousquet and Laplante 2000, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. MA, OR (Hatch 1962, Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First Canadian records. Mer Bleue, ON in 1980 (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First North American records. McMinnville, OR in 1941 (Hatch 1962).
Habitat data. is species is recorded from decaying vegetable matter (Peacock 1977).
7. Monotoma quadrifoveolata Aubé
(Fig. 7, Map 6)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.9–2.3 mm, body dorsally uniformly yellowish to reddish,
covered with moderately dense setae; head without antennal grooves and without lon-
gitudinal impressions on frons, temples long, 1.2–1.5 times length of longitudinal
diameter of eye, dorsal part of head and pronotum with coarse, subcontiguous punc-
tures; antennal club 2-segmented; pronotum subquadrate to slightly elongate, disc
with four deep impressions conuent into two longitudinal furrows, anterior angles
of pronotum not protruding; elytra with rows of paired punctures; fore-coxal cavities
rounded; rst abdominal ventrite longer than remaining ventrites, without coxal lines,
with slight, oval median depression in the male.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Nikitsky 1986, Jelinek 2007b).
Distribution in Canada. ON (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
Distribution in USA. DC, IL, MN, NM, NY, PA (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First Canadian records. Tilbury, ON in 1967 (Bousquet and Laplante 2000). is is
the only known collection locality for this species in Canada.
First North American records. DC before 1879 (Horn 1879).
Habitat data. is species is found in decaying vegetable matter (Peacock 1977).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
26
8. Monotoma testacea Motschulsky
(Fig. 8, Map 7)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8–2.2 mm, body more or less uniformly reddish-brown
dorsally or elytra slightly paler than fore-body, dorsally covered with moderately dense
and short yellowish setae, dorsal part of head and pronotum with coarse, subcontigu-
ous punctures; head without antennal grooves and without longitudinal impressions
on frons, temples moderately long, 0.6–0.8 times length of longitudinal diameter of
eye; antennal club 2-segmented; pronotum with two very shallow, sometimes indis-
tinct, impressions on anterior half of disc, anterior angles of pronotum slightly pro-
truding, the extremity rounded; elytra with rows of paired punctures; fore-coxal cavi-
ties rounded; rst abdominal ventrite longer than remaining ventrites, without coxal
lines, with slight, oval median depression in the male.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in New Zealand (Bousquet and Laplante 2000,
Jelinek 2007b).
Distribution in Canada. AB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, ID, IL, KS, MA, MD, NH, NY, OK, OR, TX (Bous-
quet and Laplante 2000).
First Canadian records. Montreal, QC in 1919; Drinkwater and rasher, SK in
1953; and New Dayton, AB in 1954 (Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
First North American records. CA before 1916 (Casey 1916).
Habitat data. Peacock (1977) recorded this species from decaying vegetable matter
and granaries. In Canada, some specimens were collected in mill feeds and oat bins
(Bousquet and Laplante 2000).
Family CRYPTOPHAGIDAE Kirby [the silken fungus beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 0.8-5.2 mm, elongate and parallel sided and moderately at-
tened [Cryptophaginae] to ovoid and somewhat convex [Atomariinae], yellowish or
reddish-brown to brown or black, pubescence variable, long or short, decumbent to
erect, often with silky hairs; head with short neck which is retracted into thorax, man-
dible with well-developed molar but lacking mycangium or cavity; antennae 11-seg-
mented with 3-segmented club (rarely with 1-2 segments), inserted into a small or
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 27
large exposed cavity; pronotum subquadrate to rounded with well-developed lateral
carina, lateral margins with or without teeth, processes or angularities; elytra complete-
ly covering abdomen, punctation random or in poorly dened rows; abdomen with
ve freely articulated sternites, basal sternite longer than remaining sterna in genera
treated here; procoxae rounded and separate with their cavities open or closed; meso-
coxal cavities closed laterally by metasternum; tarsal formula 5-5-5 in females, in males
5-5-4 (Cryptophaginae) or 5-5-5 (Atomariinae).
Subfamily CRYPTOPHAGINAE Kirby
9. Cryptophagus cellaris (Scopoli)
(Fig. 9, Map 8)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-3.0 mm, elongate and parallel sided, yellowish-brown,
fore-body dark brown; antennal club elongate, 3-segmented, antennomeres as long as
wide; pronotum transverse, pronotal anterior callosities small, moderately thickened,
prominent laterally, right angled posteriorly, lateral tooth at middle of side with side
converging from tooth to base in a straight line, punctation moderately deep with
punctures separated by 0.5-1.0 times the diameter of a puncture (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961, page 200, Fig. 26a); elytral pubescence with longer hairs obliquely
raised and arranged in rows; aedeagus a single robust tube with base widened and
attened, apex narrowly forked, parameres somewhat globular at base, elongate and
narrowly rounded near apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 200, Figs. 26b, c).
is species diers from its other congeners by having large, but not prominent,
hemispherical eyes, and two types of elytral pubescence that consist of small, decum-
bent setae and longer ones slightly raised and arranged in vertical rows.
Native range. Palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, ON, QC, SK (Downie and Arnett 1996,
Bousquet et al. 2013). Although this species has previously been reported from an un-
specied location in MB (Woodroe and Coombs 1961), we could not locate a speci-
men from that province. We report this species for the rst time from QC: Cap Rouge,
1861-1878 (CIUL); Lachine, 1929 (LFC), Lévis, 1880-1889 (CIUL), Montreal, 1915
(LFC), and Saguenay, 1879 (CIUL).
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, CO, DC, FL, IA, IL, KS, MI, MN, MO, MT, NC,
NJ, NV, NY, OR, PA, TN, UT, WA, WI, WY (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie
and Arnett 1996).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
28
First Canadian records. Cap Rouge, QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); Saguenay,
QC in 1879 (CIUL); Hastings County, ON in 1895 (CNCI); and Creston, BC in
1949 (UBC).
First North American records. Bualo, NY, Detroit MI, and San Diego CA before
1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. is species is recorded from Canadian cargo ships carrying wheat,
our, soybean meal, and beans (Aitken 1975, Bousquet 1990a). It is also found in
products such as such as wheat, oats, barley, rice, bran, our, bread, linseed fruit and
dried fruit (Campbell et al. 1989).
10. Cryptophagus distinguendus Sturm
(Fig. 10, Map 9)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-2.2 mm, narrowly oval, uniformly brown or head and
pronotum dark brown, elytra reddish-brown with darker spot near scutellum and
alongside lateral margins in basal half of lateral margin; legs and antennae reddish-
brown; eyes large and prominent; antennal club elongate, 3-segmented, two basal
segments transverse; pronotum slightly transverse, anterior callosities very small,
weakly thickened and not prominent laterally with posterior rim thickened into
moderate tooth, lateral tooth at or behind middle of side, sides concave anterior to
lateral tooth and convex behind lateral tooth (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page
191, Fig. 8a); punctures larger and deeper than those on elytra; elytral pubescence
long and decumbent; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube with base widened
and attened, outer apical angles rounded with inner angle constricted into a tooth
that faces medially, parameres short and broad, transversely truncate (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961, page 191, Figs. 8b, c).
e parameres of the male genitalia are distinctive for this species.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Casey 1924 [as C. keeni], Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, NY, PA, WA (Woodroe and Coombs 1961).
First Canadian records. Metlakatla, BC before 1924 (Casey 1924).
First North American records. As above.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 29
Habitat data. is species is found in grain elevators, granaries, mills and bakeries,
nests (birds, mammals and ants), haystacks, vegetable refuse, dried fruit, fungi, and
stored food products (Hinton 1945, Campbell et al. 1989).
Comments. is species appears to have been introduced on separate occasions on the
east and west coasts of North America.
11. Cryptophagus fallax Balfour–Browne
(Fig. 11, Map 10)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.2-3.3 mm, broadly oval and somewhat attened, head and pro-
notum reddish-brown, elytra yellowish to reddish-brown, legs and antennae yellowish to
reddish-brown; eyes large and slightly protruding; antennal club compact, 3-segmented,
two basal segments transverse; pronotum slightly attened, subquadrate, much narrower
than elytra at base, anterior callosities large, prominent laterally, face upturned and ex-
panded posteriorly, surface with a central shallow depression, lateral tooth near or slightly
behind middle, sides nearly parallel or slightly angled at lateral tooth, punctures moderately
coarse and dense (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 193, Fig. 12a); elytra convex, with
ne punctation and decumbent pubescence; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube with
base widened and attened, outer apical angles slightly concave laterally, parameres trian-
gular, narrowly rounded at apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 193, Figs. 12b, c).
e male genitalia are somewhat typical of the genus as a whole except that the en-
dophallic orice is located beneath the apodeme instead of within the aedeagus proper,
the latter condition being typical of all the other species.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, PE (Bousquet et al 2013).
Distribution in USA. ME (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996,
Majka and Langor 2010).
First Canadian records. Sable Island, NS in 1967 (Howden 1970).
First North American records. Mt. Desert Isle, ME before 1961 (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961).
Habitat data. Adult specimens collected in Canada were found in buildings on
stored food products, except for two specimens collected on Sable Island in the nest
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
30
of an Ipswich Sparrow, Passerculus sandwichensis princeps (Gmelin) (Howden 1970,
Majka and Langor 2010).
12. Cryptophagus laticollis Lucas
(Fig. 12, Map 10)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.0 mm, broadly oval, uniformly reddish-brown, upper
body with sparse, large and coarse punctation, pubescence long and suberect; eyes
small and conical; antennal club 3-segmented, two basal segments transverse; prono-
tum transverse, anterior callosities large, not prominent laterally and weakly thickened,
blunt and broadly rounded apically, facing upwards, lateral tooth near or slightly be-
hind middle, sides evenly rounded, punctation deep and dense, almost contiguous
(Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 201, Fig. 28a); elytra convex, punctation ne,
small, and shallowly impressed; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube with base
sinuate, widest about middle, outer apical angles triangular and broadly rounded, para-
meres elongate triangular, broadly rounded at apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961,
page 201, Figs. 28b, c).
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in sub-Saharan Africa, the Orient, and Australia
(Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, NS, SK (Majka and Langor 2010, Bousquet et al.
2013). Although previously reported from AB by Woodroe and Coombs (1961), we
could not locate a specimen from that province.
Distribution in USA. CA, OR, WA (Woodroe and Coombs 1961).
First Canadian records. Royal Oaks, BC in 1953 (UBC); Fort Qu’Appelle, SK in
1966 (RSM); and Carleton, NS in 1993 (Majka and Langor 2010).
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1900 (Ca-
sey 1900).
Habitat data. It is found on stored produce and in vegetable refuse (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961).
Comments. Most records in North America are from the west. e record from NS
likely represents a separate introduction event.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 31
13. Cryptophagus obsoletus Reitter
(Fig. 13, Map 11)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.2-2.8 mm, subparallel, uniformly reddish-brown to blackish,
elytra paler at shoulders and at apex in some reddish-brown specimens, legs dark brown,
dorsum of body often blackish; pronotum transverse and almost as wide as elytra at base,
anterior callosities moderate to small, not prominent laterally, strongly projecting anteri-
orly with posterior tooth, lateral tooth in posterior half, sides almost straight and paral-
lel, punctation deep and dense, almost contiguous (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page
191, Fig. 7a); elytral punctation distinctly ner, shallower and sparser than pronotum;
aedeagus consists of a single robust tube with base sinuate, widest at apical two-thirds,
apical apodemes parallel, elongate, with oblique row of short setae, parameres elongate
conical, broadly rounded at apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 191, Figs. 7b, c).
is species diers from its congeners by: having single elytral pubescence, the
anterior angles of the pronotum are protruding anteriorly, and the lateral margins of
the pronotum are only slightly convergent anteriorly.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. ON, MB, SK. We report this species for the rst time from
MB and SK (numerous localities in each province; CNCI, UMAN, RSM).
Distribution in USA. IA, IL, NY, SD (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and
Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Hamilton, ON in 1931 (CNCI); Sperling, MB in 1954
(UMAN); and Corinne and Radville, SK in 1954 (CNCI).
First North American records. See above.
Habitat data. is species is a pest of stored food products, and it has also been found in
produce and in an oak tree hole (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
14. Cryptophagus pilosus Gyllenhal
(Fig. 14, Map 12)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-3.2 mm, narrowly subparallel, uniformly dark brown,
pronotum sometimes darker than elytra; pronotum transverse, as wide at middle as
elytra at base, anterior callosities moderate to small, moderately prominent lateral-
ly and not projecting anteriorly, toothed posteriorly, lateral tooth near middle, sides
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
32
evenly angled to almost straight; punctation ne, separated by 0.5-1.0 times puncture
diameter (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 192, Fig. 9a); elytral punctation dis-
tinctly ner, shallower and sparser than pronotum; aedeagus consists of a single robust
tube, base slightly sinuate, widest in apical two-thirds, apical apodemes elongate and
slightly globose to broadly rounded apically, parameres triangular to somewhat coni-
cal, narrowly rounded at apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 192, Figs. 9b, c).
is species is very variable, particularly in elytral pubescence, which may consist
of only single short setae or double setae (one short and one long). Specimens with
double elytral setae have anterior angles of pronotum pointed posteriorly and the lat-
eral tooth is located near the middle of the side of the pronotum. ose with single
pubescence resemble C. obsoletus from which they dier by having the lateral margins
of the pronotum more convergent towards the base and by usually uniform reddish-
brown elytral integument (Bousquet 1990a).
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in sub-Saharan Africa and Australia (Johnson
et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). Al-
though previously reported from MB (Woodroe and Coombs 1961), we could not
locate a specimen from that province.
Distribution in USA. CA, CT, CO, DC, IA, ID, IL, IN, MI, MN, NJ, NY, OR, PA,
VT, WA, WI (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Sudbury, ON in 1892 (CNCI); Montreal, QC in 1916 (LFC);
Vernon and Wellington, BC in 1946 (UBC); and Punnichy, SK in 1963 (RSM).
First North American record. See above.
Habitat data. is species is found on stored vegetables, grain, bulbs, and vegetable
refuse (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
15. Cryptophagus saginatus Sturm
(Fig. 15, Map 13)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-2.8 mm, narrowly oval, uniformly reddish-brown, fore-
body strongly punctate; pronotum slightly transverse, evenly rounded, anterior callosi-
ties moderate in size, not prominent anteriorly or laterally, weakly thickened without
posterior tooth, lateral tooth is located at the middle of the side of the pronotum, sides
evenly rounded, punctation deep and moderately dense (Woodroe and Coombs 1961,
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 33
page 198, Fig. 20a); elytral punctation distinctly shallower, smaller and sparser than
pronotum; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, base moderately sinuate, widest
in apical two-thirds, apical apodemes elongate and slightly globose to broadly rounded
apically, preputial sac acuminate apically, parameres elongate triangular to conical, nar-
rowly rounded at apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 198, Figs. 20b, c).
Cryptophagus saginatus may be distinguished from its congeners by the shape of the
frontal pronotal angles, and single elytral pubescence. It may be sometimes confused
with C. scutellatus and C. subfumatus. It diers from C. scutellatus by its body length
exceeding 1.9 mm, and in having denser pronotal punctation separated by one-half to
three-quarters of their diameter. It diers from C. subfumatus in having the anterior
angles of the pronotum not prominently extended anteriorly, and the lateral tooth is
located at the middle of the side of the pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Australia and the Neotropical Region (Johnson
et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, NB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). We report
this species for the rst time from AB (ve localities; CNCI), NB (Odell Park, Freder-
icton; Currie Mountain, Douglas; C.F.B. Gagetown; RWC) and QC (Roberval; LFC).
Distribution in USA. AK, CA, CT, CO, IA, ID, IL, MA, MN, NH, NY, OH, OR,
PA, WA (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Trenton, ON in 1896 (CNCI); Roberval, QC in 1939
(LFC); St. John’s, NL in 1949 (ACNL); Exshaw, AB in 1959 (CNCI); and Radium,
BC in 1985 (CNC).
First North American records. SC (unspecied locality) before 1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. In Great Britain, this is one of the commonest species indoors and is also
abundant in the wild (Coombs and Woodroe 1955). is species is found on stored grain
produce and vegetable refuse (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996),
and has been recorded on Canadian cargo ships carrying soybeans and meal (Aitken 1975).
16. Cryptophagus scanicus (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 16, Map 14)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.2-2.8 mm, narrowly oval, black with reddish humeral patches
or reddish-brown mottled with dark brown patches; pronotum strongly transverse and
broadest apically, anterior callosities large, almost one-quarter length of side, prominent
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
34
laterally but not anteriorly, strongly thickened, somewhat rounded posteriorly, lateral
tooth near middle, sides concave anteriorly of lateral tooth and almost straight basally,
punctation deep and dense, almost contiguous (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page
206, Fig. 44a); elytral punctation shallower and sparser than on pronotum; aedeagus
consists of a single robust tube, base moderately sinuate, widest in apical two-thirds, api-
cal apodemes slightly globose basally and narrowly rounded apically, parameres broadly
triangular converging strongly in apical three-quarters to form a narrowly rounded,
somewhat elongate apex (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 206, Figs. 44b, c).
is species diers from other congeners in having single elytral pubescence, an-
terior angles of pronotum not drawn out posteriorly, and dorsal part of the body is
bicolorous with head and pronotum reddish and elytra darker, often blackish, with the
exception of the humeral region. Uniformly reddish specimens are known from Europe,
but in North America only bicolorous specimens have been found (Bousquet 1990a).
Native range. Palaearctic; may be adventive to sub-Saharan Africa (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NF (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. St. Johns, NF in 1949 (Woodroe and Combs 1961; ACNL).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. It Europe, this species is found in various habitats including stored pro-
duce (Woodroe and Combs 1961).
17. Cryptophagus scutellatus Newman
(Fig. 17, Map 14)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.9 mm, narrowly subparallel, reddish-brown with fore-
body darker; pronotum slightly tranverse, almost quadrate, anterior callosities small,
slightly prominent laterally and anteriorly, weakly thickened and angled posteriorly,
lateral tooth in apical half, sides deeply concave anterior of lateral tooth and slight-
ly rounded to base, punctation small, somewhat shallow and sparse (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961, page 194, Fig. 13a); elytral punctation similar to pronotum but some-
what more sparse; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, base moderately sinuate,
widest in apical two-thirds, apical apodemes globose basally and obliquely truncate
apically, parameres broadly triangular to oval, broadly rounded at apex (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961, page 194, Figs. 13b, c).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 35
is species is readily distinguishable from its congeners in having single elytral
pubescence, small body size, and sparse pronotal punctation with punctures separated
by at least their diameter. e shape of the pronotum is also distinctive.
Native range. Palaearctic (Woodroe and Coombs 1961).
Distribution in Canada. ON, QC (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Bousquet et al.
2013). is species is newly recorded from QC: Saint-Jacques-de-Leeds, 1993 (LFC).
Distribution in USA. CT, PA, WA (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and
Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Britannia, ON in 1928 (CNCI).
First North American records. WA before 1961 (Hatch 1962).
Habitat data. is species is a pest of stored grain and produce (Woodroe and
Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
Comments. Given the disjunct distribution of this species in North America, it ap-
pears that there may have been separate introduction events on the east and west coasts.
18. Cryptophagus subfumatus Kraatz
(Fig. 18, Map 15)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-3.0 mm, broadly elongate, almost uniformly reddish-
brown, pubescence single and yellow; pronotum distinctly transverse, anterior cal-
losities very large, almost one-third length of side, prominent laterally and projecting
strongly anteriorly, strongly thickened and angulate posteriorly, lateral tooth at mid-
dle, pronotum sides evenly rounded, punctation moderately deep and moderately
dense (Woodroe and Coombs 1961, page 202, Fig. 30a); elytral punctation distinct-
ly ner, shallower and sparser than that on pronotum; aedeagus consists of a single
robust tube, base moderately sinuate, widest in apical two-thirds, apical apodemes
globose basally and broadly rounded apically, parameres somewhat quadrate with api-
cal medial corner slightly extended and narrowly rounded (Woodroe and Coombs
1961, page 202, Figs. 30b, c).
is species diers from its congeners in having a single elytral pubescence and in
the shape of the pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in neotropics (Johnson et al. 2007).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
36
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, NB, ON, QC, SK (Downie and Arnett 1996,
Bousquet et al. 2013). is species is newly recorded from NB (Acadia Research
Forest, Cranberry Lake PNA, Dionne Brook PNA; RWC). Hatch (1962) recorded
this species from northwestern BC but we could not locate a specimen or specic
locality record.
Distribution in USA. AL, AR, AZ, FL, ID, IL, ME, MI, NH, NY, OH, WA
(Woodroe and Coombs 1961, Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Hastings County, ON in 1897 (CNCI); Montreal, QC in
1915 (LFC); and Lethbridge, AB in 1924 (CNCI).
First North American records. As above; earliest records from USA unknown.
Habitat data. Woodroe and Coombs (1961) noted that C. subfumatus is usually
found on dried fruit in Europe and on grain in North America. It is also found in
buildings on grain and dried fruit in North America (Downie and Arnett 1996).
19. Henoticus serratus (Gyllenhal)
(Figs. 19, 104a, b, Map 16)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-2.3 mm, narrowly subparallel, reddish-brown to black-
ish, sparsely covered with yellow setae, legs usually paler; eyes large and protuberant;
pronotum transverse and convex, sides evenly arcuate with 8-10 ne teeth that become
obsolete towards the obtuse hind angles, base with a deep, smooth, transverse impres-
sion, punctation deep, relatively small, circular to oval, moderately dense, separated by
1.0-1.5 times diameter of a puncture; elytra slightly wider than pronotum and obtusely
rounded apically, converging slightly anteriorly, punctures foveate, shallow, tending to
be closer together than pronotal punctures; aedeagus consists of a single dorso-ventral-
ly attened tube, base moderately sinuate, widest in apical one-third, apical apodemes
widest basally, narrowing apically into a narrow point, bifurcate at apex, parameres
narrowly conical, gradually narrowing, broadly round at apex (Figs. 104a, b).
is species is readily distinguished from its congeners by the distinct shape of the
pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, QC, SK. is species
is newly recorded from AB (several localities; CNCI) and LB (Charlottetown; MUN).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 37
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed.
First Canadian records. Sudbury, ON in 1890 (CNCI); Montreal, QC in 1899 (UMAN);
Wellington, BC in 1946 (MUN); and South Branch and Woody Point, NF in 1949 (MUN).
First North American records. AK, CA, MA, NH, PA before 1894 (Hamilton 1894).
Habitat data. Adults in Atlantic Canada were collected in wild habitats such as red
spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and red oak (Quercus rubra L.) forests (Majka and Langor
2010, Webster et al. 2012). Blatchley (1910) reported it from dry fungi. Bousquet
(1990a) noted that adults of Henoticus are usually found in leaf litter, fungi, under bark
of dead or dying trees, and on leaves of trees and shrubs.
Comments. It is uncertain whether this species is palaearctic and adventive or holarc-
tic (Bousquet et al. 2013).
20. Pteryngium crenatum (Gyllenhal)
(Figs. 20, 105a, b, Map 17)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-2.1 mm, narrowly subparallel, fore-body reddish-brown
and elytra yellowish-brown with some brownish patches or entirely rufo-testaceous,
surface glossy, pubescence obscure and decumbent; head distinctly punctate, punc-
tures deep, round and moderately dense; eyes small and at; pronotum transverse,
sides evenly and nely serrated, base with two small fovea not connected by basal
transverse impression, punctation of disk moderately deep, somewhat foveate, mod-
erately dense; elytra punctation similar to pronotum, slightly more foveate and strigu-
lose between punctures; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, base moderately
sinuate in basal one-third, more or less equal in width basally and apically, lateral
apical apodemes broadly round and blunt, median apical apodeme sharply pointed, a
fourth ventral, attened, pointed apodeme present, parameres elongate oval, narrow-
ly rounded at apex with several accessory setae at apex and laterally (Figs. 105a, b).
is species is readily distinguished from congeners by its small body size, body
shape and coloration, subquadrate segments of the antennal club, large eyes and evenly
arcuate lateral margins of the pronotum.
Native range. Western palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, QC, NB, NS. is species is newly reported from
AB (Cypress Hills; CNCI).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
38
Distribution in USA. IN, NH, OR, WA (Downie and Arnett 1996, Chandler 2001).
First Canadian records. Quebec, QC in 1934 (CNCI); Garibaldi Park, BC in 1953
(CNCI); Cypress Hills, AB in 1964 (CNCI); and Lunenburg, NS in 1997 (NSM).
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1900
(Casey 1900).
Habitat data. In NS, all specimens were collected in coniferous forests, and most of
them were found on bracket fungi (Polyporaceae) (Majka and Langor 2010). In NB,
adults were captured using Lindgren funnel traps deployed in old-growth forests of
various types (Webster et al. 2012).
Comments. e disjunct distribution of this species in North America suggests prob-
able separate introduction events on the east and west coasts.
21. Telmatophilus typhae (Fallén)
(Fig. 21, Map 18)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-1.8 mm, narrowly subparallel, uniformly black with
reddish-brown legs, body finely and densely punctate, pubescence decumbent and
yellow-to-gray; eyes prominent; antennal club 3-segmented, basal segment sub-
quadrate and second one transverse; pronotum transverse, lateral margins evenly
arcuate, slightly more strongly converging basally, and minutely serrated later-
ally; elytra long and subparallel, basal punctures small and deep, anterior edges
slightly raised, separated by about one times their diameter, becoming shallower,
smaller and more diffuse towards apex; aedeagus conists of a single robust tube,
cylindrical, subapical flanges triangular and wide, apex triangular and drawn out
to a sharp point, lacking accessory structures (Hoebeke and Wheeler 2000, page
399, Fig. 3).
is species diers from the North American Telmatophilus americanus LeConte
by its smaller body size, unmodied metatibia in males, a shallow depression at the
apex of the fth abdominal sternite, and a relatively simple aedeagus.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, ON, PE (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. Not known from the USA.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 39
First Canadian records. Weston, ON in 1978 (DEBU) and Conrad Island, NS in
1986 (NSM).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In North America, it is found on the male owers of cattails, Typha
latifolia L. and T. angustifolia L. (Typhaceae) (Majka et al. 2010).
Subfamily ATOMARIINAE LeConte
e taxonomy of North American species of Atomaria is very poorly known and it is
dicult to identify material with certainty. Records of Atomaria from Canada should
therefore be treated with caution until there is a revision of the genus. All of the species
treated here have uncertain origins; they may be palaearctic or holarctic.
22. Atomaria (Anchicera) apicalis Erichson
(Fig. 22, Map 19)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.3-1.6 mm, narrowly oval, strongly convex, coloration variable,
reddish-brown with elytra slightly gradually paler apically or piceous to castaneous or rarely
black, punctation of elytra similar to that of pronotum or ner and shallower but always less
dense; antennomere I swollen, almost cylindrical, not noticeably widened apically, equal in
length to antennomere II, antennomeres VI-XI distinctly transverse; pronotal margins arcu-
ate and strongly converging apically, base almost straight, slightly sinuate; elytra oval, sides in
basal half diverging in almost straight lines, suddenly and strongly converging in apical half;
aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, oblong-oval, widest in basal half and converging api-
cally, apical margin drawn out out into a broad truncate tooth, parameres fused into a broadly
rounded, attened ange with lateral edges upturned and folded medially, base formed by a
moderately robust, highly divergent forked spicule (Majka et al. 2010, page 44, Fig. 12.1).
is species is highly variable in colour and form; however, it can be distinguished
from other Atomaria spp. by the shape and form of the pronotum, and the form of the
basal antennomeres.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. MB, NB, NF, NS, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CT, IA, IN, MA, MS, NH, NY (Majka et al. 2010 and refer-
ences therein).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
40
First Canadian records. Aweme, MB in 1912 (CNCI) and Bridgewater, NS in 1965
(Majka et al. 2010).
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1889
(Fauvel 1889); and IN (unspecied locality) before 1910 (Blatchley 1910).
Habitat data. is is a grassland species that has been recorded around farms, gardens,
parks, and in refuse, cut vegetation, grass compost, dung, ood debris, carrion, and
rotting fungi (Johnson 1993).
23. Atomaria (Anchicera) fuscata Schönherr
(Fig. 23, Map 20)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.4-1.7 mm, broadly oval, dark red-brown castaneous, prono-
tum and head sometimes darker than elytra, legs reddish or reddish-testaceous; antenno-
mere I enlarged, longer and wider than the cylindrical antennomere II, antennomere III
longer and narrower than antennomere II, antennomere X about three times wider than
antennomere IX, making the club appear abrupt and distinct; pronotum widest at mid-
dle, lateral margin broadening from base to about half the length of side and then rapidly
converging apically, forming angular edges in middle of lateral margins, base of disc with
transverse impression, pronotal punctures moderately ne and dense apically becom-
ing progressively coarser and denser basally; elytral punctures ne and sparse, punctures
separated by more than two times puncture diameter; aedeagus consists of a single robust
tube, cylindrical, base and apex broadly rounded, apex heavily sclerotized and minutely
punctured, parameres fused into a broadly rounded, attened ange, apex heavily scle-
rotized and minutely punctured, apical edge with many short setae, base formed by a
very robust, highly divergent forked spicule (Majka et al. 2010, page 44, Fig. 12.3).
is species can be distinguished from other Atomaria species by the more-or-less
uniform red-brown colour, the form of the antennal segments, and the form of the
pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, LB, MB, NB, NF NS, NU, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bous-
quet et al. 2013). is species is reported for the rst time from AB (Eureka River,
Touchwood Lake; NOFC) and NU (Turquetil Lake; DEBU).
Distribution in USA. DC, ID, IN, MA, MD, MI, NH, NY, OR, PA, RI, VA, WA,
WI (Majka et al. 2010 and references therein).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 41
First Canadian records. Ottawa, ON before 1900 (Casey 1900, as A saginata); York-
ton, SK in 1947 (RSM); Piccadilly and St. Barbe, NF in 1949 (MZH); and Chester,
NS in 1960 (NSM; Majka et al. 2010).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Atlantic Canada, it was collected in mixed and coniferous forests,
pastures, blueberry and potato elds, hedgerows, in coastal dunes, on beaches under
drift, by freshwater ponds, and in compost (Majka et al. 2010). In Alberta, it was
collected in natural forest in window traps attached to dead Populus (NOFC). Hatch
(1962) reported this species as very common on herbage and in grass clippings, com-
post, leaf litter, and humus. Johnson (1993) reported it from grasslands, wetlands, and
woodlands in litter, moss, ood debris, cut vegetation and compost.
24. Atomaria (Anchicera) lederi Johnson
(Fig. 24, Map 21)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.2-1.4 mm, narrowly oval and robust, reddish-testaceous,
fore-body sometimes darker, head, pronotum and elytra moderately coarsely and
densely punctate; antennomere I enlarged, cylindrical, antennomere II similar to an-
tennomere I in size and form, antennomeres III and V similar to each other in size and
shape, slightly shorter and narrower than antennomere II; antennomeres IX and X
somewhat elongate-quadrate, the club appearing more gradually enlarged; pronotum
widest at middle, evenly arcuate laterally, slightly more converging to apex than to
base; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, base slightly sinuate, gradually divergent
towards apex, apical margin transverse, parameres fused into a shallowly bilobed, at-
tened ange, base a broadly triangular shield, basal margin broadly rounded (Majka et
al. 2010, page 44, Fig. 12.4).
is species is distinguished from congeners by a more robust body form, a unique
form of the basal antennomeres, a more gradual antennal club, and very distinctive
male genitalia.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NS (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Bridgewater, NS in 1965 (NSM; Majka et al. 2010).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
42
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. e species is reported in Nova Scotia mainly from mixed red spruce and
eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr., forests of various ages, and occasionally in
boggy areas on Spiraea alba Duroi and balsam r, Abies balsamea (L.) (Majka et al. 2010).
25. Atomaria (Anchicera) lewisi Reitter
(Fig. 25, Map 22)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-2.0 mm, narrowly oval, entirely brownish-yellow or
reddish-brown, head, pronotum and elytra densely punctate, punctures moderately
large, setae long, prominent and erect - giving a “bristling” appearance - particularly
on elytra; antennomere I curved, long and enlarged at apex, 1.5-2.0 times the width
at base, antennomere II about two-thirds as long as antennomere I, antennomere III
subequal in length to antennomere II but narrower, antennomeres IV-VIII robust,
subquadrate, almost as wide as long, antennomeres IX and X distinctly transverse;
pronotum widest at middle, evenly arcuate laterally and apically, basal margin with
strong bead; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, lateral margin slightly sinu-
ate, narrowest at middle and widest at base, apical margin obliquely transverse with
moderately large median subquadrate, blunt tooth, parameres fused into a attened
ange, apex broadly rounded with lateral edges upraised and turned inwards, base
formed by a robust, highly divergent forked spicule with angulate spines on each side
of the basal apodeme where the forks diverge (Majka et al. 2010, page 44, Fig. 12.5).
is species can be readily distinguished from congeners by the form of the anten-
nomeres and by the distinct aedeagus.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CT, MA (Majka et al. 2010 and references therein).
First Canadian records. Ottawa, ON before 1900 (Casey 1900, under synonymic A.
curtula); Ridgeway, ON before 1900 (DEBU); Berthierville, QC in 1932 (LFC); and
St. Andrew’s, NB in 1978 (DEBU).
First North American records. CT (unspecied locality) before1920 (Leng 1920 [as
A. curtula], Majka et al. 2010).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 43
Habitat data. In NS, it has been found in coniferous and mixed forests, in boggy ar-
eas, on Crataegus sp. (Rosaceae), and in compost (Majka et al. 2010). Johnson (1993)
considers it as a grassland species in Europe where it has been recorded around farms,
gardens and parks, and also in other habitats such as heaps of refuse, cut vegetation,
hay, grass and compost.
26. Atomaria (Anchicera) pusilla (Paykull)
(Fig. 26, Map 23)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-1.2 mm, narrowly oval and rounded posteriorly, reddish-
yellow or reddish-brown throughout but legs sometimes more yellow; head nely and
sparsely punctate; antennomere I sub-cylindrical, about two times as long as wide,
not expanded at apex, antennomere II similar in form to antennomere I but slightly
shorter and narrower, antennomere III similar in form to antennomere II but slightly
shorter and narrower, antennomere VIII spherical, smaller than antennomere VII and
much smaller than antennomere IX; antennomeres IX and X distinctly transverse,
club appearing abrupt and distinct; pronotum widest at middle, strongly converging
apically and slightly converging basally; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, cy-
lindrical; base wider than apex, converging slightly at middle, basal and apical margins
broadly rounded, apex heavily sclerotized and minutely punctured, parameres fused
into a broadly rounded, attened ange, apex heavily sclerotized and minutely punc-
tured, base goblet-shaped with basal margin broadly round to truncate (Majka et al.
2010, page 44, Fig. 12.6).
is is the smallest species of Atomaria in the Nearctic region.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NB, NS ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is spe-
cies is reported for the rst time from ON (several localities; DEBU and CNCI) and
SK (Morse; RSM).
Distribution in USA. AK, CT, ID, IN, NY, OH, OR, WA (Majka et al. 2010 and
references therein).
First Canadian records. Vineland, ON in 1930 (DEBU); Quebec, QC in 1938
(LFC); Creston, BC in 1952 (UBC); and Acadiaville, NS in 1929 (ACNS).
First North American records. IN (ve counties) before 1910 (Blatchley 1910).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
44
Habitat data. In NB, it was found in coniferous forest on a decaying gill fungus (Ma-
jka et al. 2010). Johnson (1993) regarded it as a grassland species in Europe, found
around farms and gardens, collected from heaps of refuse, cut vegetation, hay, grass
and compost. Blatchley (1910) reported it from a border of sphagnum marsh and in
other damp vegetable debris.
27. Atomaria (Anchicera) testacea Stephens
(Fig. 27, Map 24)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.3-1.6 mm, narrowly oval, elytra slightly pointed api-
cally, head and pronotum piceous, elytra piceous basally and reddish-brown pos-
teriorly, legs and antennae dark testaceous; head nely and moderately sparsely
punctate; antennomere I enlarged, slightly curved and widened at apex, antenno-
mere II somewhat triangular, half as long as antennomere I, rounded and expanded
at apex, antennomere III similar in form to antennomere II but slightly narrower,
antennomere VII slightly wider apically than antennomeres VI and VIII, antenno-
meres IX-XI transverse; pronotum widest at middle, strongly converging apically
and slightly converging basally, base of disc with narrow transverse impression;
elytra widest in basal half, slightly sinuate laterally and converging posteriorly;
aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, oblong-oval, widest in basal half and con-
verging apically, apical margin drawn out into a broad point, parameres fused into
a broadly rounded, attened ange with lateral edges upturned and folded medi-
ally, base formed by a moderately robust, highly divergent forked spicule (Majka et
al. 2010, page 44, Fig. 12.7).
e aedeagus of A. testacea is similar in form to that of A. apicalis, the dierence
being that for A. testacea the apical margin is much more narrowly rounded and comes
to a distinct point, whereas for A. apicalis it is more broadly rounded and not pointed.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA (Leng 1920, under synonym A. rucornis Marsham).
First Canadian records. Montreal, QC in 1937 (LFC) and St. Andrews, NB in 1978
(DEBU).
First North American records. Southern CA before 1920 (Leng 1920, under syno-
nym A. rucornis Marsham).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 45
Habitat data. is species was recorded in Atlantic Canada from red spruce forests,
boggy areas, marshes, pastures, elds, meadows, open areas, on beaches under wrack,
in a ravine, and in compost (Majka et al. 2010). Johnson (1993) reported it as a grass-
land species in Europe as it is found around farms, gardens and parks, but it has also
been collected from heaps of refuse, especially cut vegetation, grass, hay, haystack bot-
toms, compost, and dung.
28. Atomaria (Atomaria) atrata Reitter
(Fig. 28, Map 25)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-1.8 mm, narrowly oval, piceous, elytra sometimes
paler near humeral angles, legs sometimes lighter, rarely contrasting, head and
pronotum coarsely, deeply punctured, punctures separated by 1.0-1.5 times punc-
ture diameter, elytra similarly punctured at base, becoming finer and sparser to-
wards apex, pubescence moderately long, coarse and decumbent; antennomere
I enlarged, curved and widened at apex, antennomere II somewhat cylindrical,
half as long as antennomere I, rounded and somewhat expanded at apex, anten-
nomere III similar in form to antennomere II but slightly narrower, antennomere
VII slightly wider apically than antennomeres VI and VIII, antennomeres IX-VII
almost quadrate; pronotum widest at middle, evenly arcuate on sides and converg-
ing from middle more strongly apically than basally, appearing somewhat quad-
rate; aedeagus consists of a single robust tube, sub-cylindrical, widest near base
and converging apically, apical margin widely bilobed; parameres fused into an
angulate, broadly pointed, flattened flange with many accessory setae along api-
cal edge, base formed by a robust, highly divergent forked spicule, basal apodeme
broadly widened.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC? (Bousquet et al. 2013). Although reported from BC,
we have not been able to nd a specimen or a specic locality record. is species was
previously identied from AB but we were unable to re-examine this material as it is
on loan. We will therefore not add this as a new jurisdictional record.
Distribution in USA. Unknown.
First Canadian records. Unknown.
First North American records. Unknown.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
46
Habitat data. Unknown in North America.
Comments. As specimens or locality records could not be found, we are doubtful that
this species is present in Canada. Its presence in the USA is also doubtful.
29. Ephistemus globulus (Paykull)
(Figs. 29, 106a, b, Map 26)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-1.3 mm, oval, strongly convex and glossy, without punc-
tures or pubescence; black or piceous black, legs reddish or yellow, posterior part of
elytra sometimes reddish-brown; pronotum transverse, sides evenly curved, basal mar-
gin oblique laterally and pointed medially; elytra oval and rounded at apex; metaster-
num very long, almost as long as entire abdomen; aedeagus consists of a single robust
tube, widest at base and slightly tapering towards the broadly rounded, pointed apex,
two elongate and highly sclerotized apodemes present, base with a slender basal apo-
physis that is approximately one-half the length of the apical tube, parameres fused at
apex into a robust, quadrate shield (Figs. 106a, b).
In habitus this species resembles the family Leiodidae, except that in Ephistemus
the antennae are elongate and the head is partially visible from above.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Australia (Johnson et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, ON (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. ID, IN, NY, OR, WA (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Vineland, ON in 1930 (DEBU) and Cowichan and Royal
Oak, BC in 1953 (UBC).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In BC, it was found commonly in grass clippings (Hatch 1962).
Comments. e disjunct distribution of this species in North America suggests two
separate introduction events, one in the east and one in the west.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 47
Family SILVANIDAE Kirby [the silvanid at bark beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-15 mm, usually strongly dorso-ventrally attened, elongate-
oval or parallel-sided, brown to blackish, sometimes with a pattern, pubescence usually
conspicuous; head large, constricted behind eyes, labrum small, broadly rounded; an-
tenna with 11 antennomeres, liform, with elongate scape and an inconspicuous club, or
moderately elongate, with a short scape and distinct club; pronotum transverse to elon-
gate, usually constricted basally and often with lateral spines or teeth; elytra usually com-
pletely covering abdomen, with broad epipleural fold, with longitudinal punctate striae;
abdomen with ve visible sternites, sutures entire; procoxae round, narrowly to broadly
separated, their cavities open or closed posteriorly; mesocoxae round, broadly to narrowly
separated and with cavities open laterally; metacoxae transverse; tarsal formula 5-5-5.
Subfamily SILVANINAE Kirby
30. Ahasverus advena (Waltl)
(Fig. 30, Map 27)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.2 mm, body narrowly ovate, markedly convex dorsally;
head with short temple, base of mandible with dorsal setose pit (mycangium); antenna
with club, antennomere X about as wide as XI, antennomere XI acuminate apically; later-
al edges of pronotum simple, not clearly dentate or undulate, anterior angle of pronotum
lobed; fore-coxal cavities closed posteriorly; tarsomere III lobed; intercoxal process of rst
abdominal ventrite rounded anteriorly; femoral line on rst abdominal ventrite open.
Native range. Likely palaearctic in origin but now cosmopolitan (Halstead et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. MA, ME, NH (Majka 2008) but likely throughout the USA.
First Canadian records. Quebec City, QC in ~1860 (Bain 1999); Vineland, ON in
1930 (DEBU); Edmonton, AB in 1942 (CNCI); and Creston, BC in 1949 (UBC).
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1854 (Le-
Conte 1854).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
48
Habitat data. is species feeds on surface moulds such as Penicillium glaucoma and
Aspergillus sp., and it has been found on mouldy copra, lima beans, pigeon peas, stored
grain, fruit, nuts, corn, dried pears, cereals, damp our, rice, gs, apples, coee beans,
mouldy grass, cured ham, heated wheat, triticale, stored oats, and decaying soybeans
(Campbell et al. 1989, omas 1993).
Comments. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
31. Nausibius clavicornis (Kugelann)
(Fig. 31, Map 28)
Diagnosis. Body length 3.2-4.5 mm, narrow and subparallel, dark brown to blackish,
legs reddish to reddish-black, pubescence dense and decumbent; fore-body densely
punctate; head ventrally without antennal cavities, base of mandible with dorsal setose
pit (mycangium); antennae lacking pronounced club; pronotum subquadrate, with a
distinctly less densely punctate area medially and with a crescent-shape depression ba-
sally, lateral edges undulate; fore-coxal cavities closed posteriorly; tarsal formula 5-5-5
in both sexes, tarsomere I longer than tarsomere II, tarsomere III not lobed.
Native range. Originally neotropical; now cosmopolitan (omas 1993).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, FL, MA, MD, NC, NY, PA, SC, TX (Downie and Arnett
1996, Bain 1998).
First Canadian records. Cap Rouge, QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); Ridgeway, ON
before 1900 (DEBU); and Saint John, NB in 1902 (NBM).
First North American records. Boston, MA in ~1670 (Bain 1998).
Habitat data. is species is found in subcortical habitats and old bees’ nests, and is
also associated with stored food products such as rice, dried apples, ginger, cassia, and
raw yellow-crystal sugar (omas 1993).
Comments. In the collections examined, only two records of this species were found
in recent history, both in NS in 1968 and 2008. It seems that this species is rarely col-
lected in Canada.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 49
32. Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel)
(Fig. 32, Map 29)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.4-3.4 mm, narrowly elongate, reddish-brown; head with
temples short, length of temple less than one-third longitudinal diameter of eye, base
of mandible with dorsal setose pit (mycangium); antenna with club; pronotum elon-
gate, lateral edges with six moderately to strongly acute, large teeth; fore-coxal cavi-
ties closed posteriorly; males have spine-like projection on posterior margin of hind
trochanter and the upper margin of hind femur, females luck such projections, tarsal
formula 5-5-5 in both sexes.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Halstead et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, PE, QC, SK (Loschi-
avo and Smith 1970, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed.
First Canadian records. Edmonton, AB in 1925; Vernon, BC in 1931; Winnipeg,
MB in 1936; Quebec, QC in 1937 (LFC); Toronto, ON in 1939; Saint John, NB in
1946 (CNCI); and Stoughton, SK in 1944 (Loschiavo and Smith 1970).
First North American records. Boston, MA in ~1670 (Bain 1998) and 1675-1740
(Bain and King 2011).
Habitat data. e species occurs in heated food-storage premises across Canada (Bous-
quet 1990a). It is considered a common household pest in Canada (Majka 2008).
Adults and larvae feed on cereal products, particularly those with high oil content such
as oatmeal, bran, shelled sunower seeds, rolled oats, and brown rice (Loschiavo and
Smith 1970, Loschiavo 1976, Campbell et al. 1989).
Comments. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
33. Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 33, Map 30)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.9-3.0 mm, narrowly elongate, dark reddish-brown; head
with temple length at least half longitudinal diameter of eye, base of mandible with
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
50
dorsal setose pit (mycangium); antenna with club; pronotum elongate, lateral edges
with six moderately-to-strongly acute, large teeth; fore-coxal cavities closed posteriorly;
males have spine-like projection on posterior margin of hind trochanter and the upper
margin of hind femur, females lack such projections, tarsal formula 5-5-5 in both sexes.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Halstead et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al.
2013).
Distribution in USA. Widespread.
First Canadian records. Ferryland, NF in ~1620 (Prévost and Bain 2007); Cap Rouge,
QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); Saint John, NB in 1902 (NBM); Picton, ON in 1909
(CNCI); Aweme, MB in 1920 (UMAN); and Victoria, BC in 1923 (CNCI).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Canada, this species is a serious pest of stored grain, and occurs
mainly in granaries, grain elevators, and our mills (Bousquet 1990a). It has been
recorded from dried fruit, copra, nuts, and carob (omas 1993). Adults and larvae
attack damaged grain and processed cereals. Its presence in household products is inci-
dental (Loschiavo and Sabourin 1982).
Comments. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
34. Silvanoprus angusticollis (Reitter)
(Fig. 34, Map 30)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.5-3.1 mm, narrowly elongate, brown to reddish-brown with
paler legs; head with temples virtually absent, mandible with dorsal setose pit (mycangi-
um), eyes large and coarsely faceted; antenna with distinct club; pronotum elongate, lateral
edge sinuate before anterior angle, anterior angle large and acute; fore-coxal cavities closed
posteriorly; femoral line on rst abdominal ventrite closed; tarsomere III lobed beneath.
Native range. Eastern palaearctic and oriental (Halstead et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. MD?, WV (Downie and Arnett 1996).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 51
First Canadian records. Varennes, QC in 1991 (C. Chantal, personal communication).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Asia, this species was found in stored food products (Downie and
Arnett 1996).
35. Silvanus bidentatus (Fabricius)
(Fig. 35, Map 31)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.5-3.5 mm, narrowly elongate, dark reddish-brown; head
with temple about as long as two eye facets, mandible with dorsal setose pit (my-
cangium); antenna with club; pronotum narrowly elongate, narrowest at base, sides
arcuate and converging basally, disc with deep lateral longitudinal foveae, well-dened
from base to apex, anterior angle large and acute; fore-coxal cavities closed posteriorly;
femoral line on rst abdominal ventrite closed; tarsomere III not lobed.
Native range. Palaearctic; now almost cosmopolitan (Halstead et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is reported for the rst time from MB (Twp. 3, Rge. 17, east of rst meridian;
CNCI).
Distribution in USA. CA, ME, NH, NY, RI, TX (Downie and Arnett 1996, Majka
2008). Probably widespread in the United States.
First Canadian records. Cap Rouge, QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); Trenton, ON in
1889 (CNCI); Fredericton, NB in 1928 (CNCI); Creston and Mission City, BC in
1932 (UBC).
First North American records. “Middle and southern states” before 1854 (LeConte
1854).
Habitat data. Species of Silvanus are found under the bark of logs and in dead trees
where they are at least partially fungivorous (omas 1993). In NS, this species has
been found most frequently under the bark of logs and dead trees in an old decidu-
ous forest, in red spruce forests of dierent ages, in old-growth hemlock forest, in
mixed eastern hemlock/balsam r/black spruce forest, and under the bark of Picea
rubens and Pinus strobus (Majka 2008). It is found most frequently in coniferous
forests (Majka 2008).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
52
Family LAEMOPHLOEIDAE Ganglbauer [the lined at bark beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-5.0 mm, usually strongly attened (rarely sub-cylindri-
cal), ovate to elongate, brown to black but sometimes bicoloured or maculate, pu-
bescence usually inconspicuous; head mostly large, broadest across eyes, disc usually
bordered by carinate or grooved sublateral lines; antenna with 11 (rarely 10) anten-
nomeres, mostly liform (rarely moniliform), with modied scape in males, and a
poor-to-well dened club; pronotum quadrate to elongate, usually constricted basally
and with disc bordered by carinate or grooved sublateral lines; elytra often with cells
and humeral carina, epipleural fold moderate to broad; abdomen with ve visible ster-
nites, sutures entire; procoxae obliquely transverse, their cavities open or closed poste-
riorly; mesocoxae globular, broadly separated and with cavities mostly open laterally;
metacoxae transverse, cavities moderately to broadly separated; tarsal formula 5-5-4 or
5-5-5 (males), 5-5-5 (females).
36. Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens)
(Fig. 36, Map 32)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.2 mm, compressed dorso-ventrally, colour yellowish,
reddish-brown or rufo-testaceous; head with lateral carina on each side of frons that is
not extended transversly near the posterior margin of head; labrum rounded anteriorly,
male with mandibles expanded laterally near base; antennae elongate, without distinct
club; pronotum broadened apically, with sublateral carinated lines, disc without de-
pressions; elytra with second interval enclosing four rows of setae; intercoxal process of
rst abdominal ventrite broadly rounded anteriorly.
Native range. Palaearctic; likely adventive in sub-Saharan Africa (Wegrzynowicz 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al.
2013).
Distribution in USA. AK, CA, FL, LA (Klimaszewski et al. 2010); probably distrib-
uted throughout the United States.
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1924 (CNCI); Fort William and Goder-
ich, ON in 1932 (CNCI); Pontiac, QC in 1932 (LFC); Carmichael, SK in 1941
(UMAN); Vancouver, BC in 1957 (UBC); St. John’s, NF in 1965 (CNCI).
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1863 (Le-
Conte 1863).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 53
Habitat data. is species is the most serious pest of stored grain, particularly of
wheat, in Canada (Watters 1955, Sinha 1961, Bousquet 1990a). It became a major
pest of stored grain in western Canada during 1939-1944 (Rilett 1949). It is found in
granaries, grain elevators, and mills, where adults and larvae feed on the germ of the
grain kernel. In tropical and subtropical regions, it infests oilseeds and cocoa beans
(Howe and Lefkovitch 1957).
Comments. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
37. Cryptolestes pusillus (Schönherr)
(Fig. 37, Map 33)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.9 mm, compressed dorso-ventrally, reddish-brown;
head with lateral carina on each side of frons extended transversly near the poste-
rior margin of head, labrum rounded anteriorly, male with mandibles expanded
laterally; antennae elongate, without distinct club; pronotum subquadrate in shape,
with sublateral carinated lines, disc without depressions; elytra with second interval
enclosing four rows of setae; intercoxal process of rst abdominal ventrite broadly
rounded anteriorly.
Native range. Likely palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Wegrzynowicz 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. ME (Majka 2008); probably throughout the United States.
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1924 (CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1930
(UBC); and Mary’s Point, NB in 1988 (Majka 2008).
First North American records. CA before 1854 (LeConte 1854, as Laemophloeus pu-
berulus).
Habitat data. is species is recorded from many countries, particularly those in
wet-tropical and warm-temperate regions of the world. In Canada, the species can
survive winter conditions only in a heated environment and, therefore, it is found
mainly in grain elevators and our mills feeding on damaged grain, preferably wheat
(Bousquet 1990a).
Comments. is species was often confused in the past with C. turcicus. It is consid-
ered a minor pest. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
54
38. Cryptolestes turcicus (Grouvelle)
(Fig. 38, Map 34)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.9-2.2 mm, compressed dorso-ventrally, colour rufo-testa-
ceous, nely punctate and pubescent; head with lateral carina on each side of frons
extended transversly near the posterior margin of head, labrum rounded anteriorly;
antennae elongate, without distinct club; pronotum approximately subquadrate with
basal constriction, with sublateral carinated lines, lateral edges even, disc without de-
pressions; elytra with second interval enclosing three rows of setae; intercoxal process
of rst abdominal ventrite broadly rounded anteriorly.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Wegrzynowicz 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Although previously recorded from AB, we were unable to locate a specimen or specic
locality record.
Distribution in USA. NH (Majka 2008); probably throughout the United States.
First Canadian records. Danville, QC in 1911 (CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1930
(UBC); Keewatin, ON in 1938 (UMAN); Homewood and Oakbank, MB in 1961
(UMAN); and Dartmouth, NS in 1986 (NSM).
First North American records. MI before 1884 (Casey 1884, as Laemophloeus trun-
catus Casey).
Habitat data. is species is a notorious pest in our and feed mills in temperate
regions. It is found in grain elevators and warehouses in Canada (Smith 1962, 1965).
Aitken (1975) recorded the species in Canadian cargo ships carrying wheat. Chang
and Loschiavo (1971) showed that the development of this species is favoured by the
presence of fungi in its diet.
Comments. Campbell et al. (1989) give a detailed summary of its biology.
Family KATERETIDAE Kirby [the kateretid beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-12.0 mm, elongate oval, depressed, pale to piceous; head
prognathous and much narrower than pronotum, eyes large and with large facets;
antennae with 11 antennomeres, last three forming a feeble club; pronotum slightly
narrower than elytra; elytra truncate posteriorly exposing pygidium and at least one
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 55
abdominal tergite, epipleura narrow, scutellum large and usually triangular; procoxal
cavities open behind; tarsal formula 5-5-5 or 4-4-4.
39. Brachypterolus pulicarius (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 39, Map 35)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.5 mm, oval and convex, body dark brown to black, legs
from light brown to piceous, integument moderately glossy and densely punctate, pubes-
cence dense and long, brown or grey; pronotum strongly transverse with sides strongly
converging apically; elytra short, exposing at least three posterior tergites, scutellum large.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek 2007a).
Distribution in Canada. AB, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al.
2013).
Distribution in USA. South to PA and west to IA; also in CO, ID, MT, NY, OR, SD,
UT, WA, WI, WY (Majka and Cline 2006a, Klimaszewski et al. 2010).
First Canadian records. Onah, MB in 1920 (CNCI); Fredericton, NB in 1921
(CNCI); Prince Edward Co., ON in 1922 (CNCI); QC (three localities) in 1927
(CNCI); Red Deer, AB in 1946 (CNCI); Mortlach, SK in 1951 (CNCI); and NF
(three localities) in 1965 (CNCI).
First North American records. Keene Valley, NY in 1918 (Parsons 1943).
Habitat data. is species is found on various owers and is associated with Linaria
(Scrophulariaceae) and Fragaria (Rosaceae) species (Parson 1943, Downie and Arnett
1996). In the Maritime Provinces, it is found on herbaceous vegetation in dierent
open habitats (Majka and Cline 2006a).
40. Brachypterus urticae (Fabricius)
(Fig. 40, Map 36)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-2.0 mm, form convex, body piceous black or brownish
with brassy tinge, legs reddish-brown to dark brown; integument glossy, sparsely pu-
bescent and moderately punctate; pronotum about twice as wide as long, broadest at
middle and strongly converging apically, sides arcuate and sinuate before base or almost
parallel, punctures slightly ner than those of elytra; elytra exposing 1-2 apical tergites.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
56
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek 2007a).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et
al. 2013). Although previously reported from NF, we could not locate a specimen or
published locality record.
Distribution in USA. is species is recorded along the Atlantic seaboard south to the
Great Smoky Mountains National Park in NC and TN, and west to MO, IA, and WI;
also in CO, WA, CA, and AK (Majka and Cline 2006a).
First Canadian records. Cap Rouge, QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); NT (unspeci-
ed locality) in 1879 (CNCI); Prince Edward Co., ON in 1899 (CNCI); Chilliwack
River, BC in 1901 (CNCI); Aweme, MB in 1903 (UMAN); Beaver Lake, AB in
1907 (CNCI); Saskatoon, SK in 1907 (CNCI); and Amherst, NS in 1994 (NSNR).
First North American records. Atlantic states (unspecied localities) before 1843 (Er-
ichson 1843) and before 1879 (Horn 1879).
Habitat data. is species is associated with nettle, Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) (Ham-
ilton 1894).
Comments. e widespread distribution of this species by the late 19th and early 20th
centuries suggests that it had been in Canada for a long time previous to that.
Family NITIDULIDAE Latreille [the sap beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-12.0 mm, narrowly-to-broadly oval, or narrowly sub-
parallel, attened, usually glabrous but sometimes with short and sparse pubes-
cence or bristles, glossy to matte, pale to black with red or yellow markings; head
prognathous with surface smooth, punctate or rugose, usually abruptly constricted
behind eyes; antennae with an abrupt and spherical club, usually comprised of three
antennomeres; pronotum with lateral borders explanate and arcuate; elytra usually
short, truncate and exposing some apical tergites or entirely covering abdomen; pro-
coxae transverse with exposed troachantins, procoxal cavities transverse and open or
closed; mesosternum short, sometimes carinate, mesocoxal cavites closed; metaster-
num large and broad, with cavities closed; tarsal formula 4-4-4 or 5-5-5, tarsomeres
dilated, with pads or setae beneath, tarsomere IV minute and V elongate.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 57
Subfamily CARPOPHILINAE Erichson
41. Carpophilus hemipterus (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 41, Map 37)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.4-4.0 mm, brownish-black to brown with paler legs and
two paler, usually yellowish, humeral and triangular apical spots, head and thorax
sparsely punctate and elytra densely so; pronotum one-third wider than long; elytra
with posterior margin shallowly V-shaped, two apical tergites exposed; males with
sixth abdominal sternite exposed and the apical margin of preceeding one deeply
emarginated, females have the sixth abdominal sternite concealed and the apical mar-
gin of preceeding one truncate.
Native range. Likely palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
is species is recorded for the rst time from SK (near Maple Creek; David J. Larson,
personal communication).
Distribution in USA. AK, CA, CO, FL, ID, IL, IN, KS, MA, NC, NY, OH, OR, TX,
WA (Parsons 1943, Downie and Arnett 1996, Majka et al. 2008).
First Canadian records. Lévis, QC from 1880-1889 (CIUL); London, ON likely be-
fore 1900 (DEBU); Winnipeg, MB in 1921 (CNCI); Kelowna, BC in 1939 (CNCI);
and Calgary, AB in 1958 (CNCI).
First North American records. Boston, MA before 1670 (Bain 1998).
Habitat data. is species may be found on a wide variety of fruits. Adults and larvae
feed on the esh of fruit, particularly when contaminated by fungi, including yeast.
e species has also been found in all kinds of dried fruit and sometimes in cereals,
oilseeds, and other derivatives (Bousquet 1990a).
42. Carpophilus dimidiatus (Fabricius)
(Fig. 42, Map 38)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-3.5 mm, subparallel, piceous to testaceous with elytra usu-
ally testaceous or slightly paler than pronotum, integument moderately glossy; pronotum
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
58
about 1.5 times as wide as long, sides slightly curved in apical one-third, straight to base;
elytra exposing 1-2 tergites, elytral punctures sparse, much ner that those of pronotum.
Native range. Likely palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). Al-
though previously recorded from BC, we were unable to locate a specimen or pub-
lished locality record.
Distribution in USA. Most of the continental USA (Parsons 1943).
First Canadian records. Lévis, QC from 1880-1889 (CIUL); Toronto, ON in 1940
(DEBU); and Saint John, NB in 1940 (UMAN).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. Adults may be found on overripe fruit (Westcott et al. 2006, Klimasze-
wski et al. 2010).
Comments. is species is abundant in temperate and tropical regions of the world
(Parsons 1943, Downie and Arnett 1996).
43. Carpophilus mutilatus Erichson
(Fig. 43, Map 39)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-3.3 mm, narrowly subparallel, dark brown to pale fer-
ruginous-brown, elytra usually paler but with suture and sides darker, integument
moderately glossy, pubescence golden except for black at apical sides of elytra; prono-
tum moderately transverse, apical margin truncate, base bisinuate with obtuse angles,
surface alutaceous except for punctated variable median strip; elytra broadest in api-
cal one-third, usually exposing two apical tergites, posterior margin of each elytron
oblique forming broadly V-shaped angle medially.
Native range. Origin uncertain; now cosmopolitan (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013). Although recorded from south-
eastern BC by Hatch (1962), we could not locate a specimen or specic locality record.
Distribution in USA. Broadly distributed across the USA (Downie and Arnett 1996).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 59
First Canadian records. Southeastern BC before 1962 (Hatch 1962).
First North American records. Unknown.
Habitat data. is species is a pest of stored food products (Downie and Arnett 1996).
Comments. Until specimens from Canada can be located and authoritatively identi-
ed, this record should be considered tentative.
44. Carpophilus marginellus Motschulsky
(Fig. 44, Map 40)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.7-3.0 mm, broadly subparallel, piceous brown, some-
times with a reddish tinge, venter paler, integument glossy; head moderately punc-
tate; pronotum about 1.5 times as wide as long, sides subparallel basally and arcu-
ately narrowed in front, hind angles well dened, disc coarsely and sparsely punctate
with median basal impunctate line; elytra usually exposing two apical tergites, pos-
terior margins angular and broadly V-shaped, at base slightly more nely punctate
than pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. MB, NB, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, FL, GA, NH, NJ, NV, VT (Downie and Arnett 1996,
Chandler 2001, Majka and Cline 2006a).
First Canadian records. Prince Edward Co., ON in 1944 (CNCI); Winkler, MB in
1964 (CNCI); and L’Islet, QC in 1980 (CIQ).
First North American records. Mobile, AL before 1910 (Fall 1910).
Habitat data. is species is associated with dried stored food products (Majka
and Cline 2006a). In Canada, specimens from PE were found in food storerooms
of hotels, and in NS, specimens were found in a food processing facility (Majka
and Cline 2006a). In Great Britain and Scandinavia, it moved and adapted from
dried products to outdoor environments such as compost heaps (Hammond 1974,
Ødegaard and Tømmeråls 2000) In Australia, it has colonized peach and nectarine
orchards (James et al. 2000).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
60
Subfamily MELIGETHINAE C.G. omson
45. Acanthogethes fuscus (Olivier)
(Fig. 45)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-2.4 mm, short and broadly oval, dark brown with paler legs
and posterior elytra, basal and scuteller part of elytra dark brown, integument densely
and nely punctate and with short and dense pubescence; pronotum with sides arcuate,
strongly converging apically from middle of disc; elytra short, about one-seventh longer
than wide, rounded apically, abdomen not exposed.
Native range. Palaearctic (Bousquet et al. 2013). Jelinek and Audisio (2007) do not
record this species from the nearctic.
Distribution in Canada. NF (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. South coast of NF before 1879 (as Meligethes pinguis 1879).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Europe, larvae are associated with the owers of Cistaceae (Audisio 1993).
Comments. is species was described on the basis of one specimen from the south coast
of NF (Horn 1879) which now resides in the J.L. LeConte collection at the Museum of
Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. Parsons (1943) stated that the specimen falls
within the range of variation of A. fuscus. No additional specimens have been collected in
Canada since, so the establishment of this species is uncertain. As larvae of this species are
associated with owers of Cistaceae (Audisio 1993), future searches for this species in NF
should focus on sampling golden heather, Hudsonia ericoides L., which is the only member
of this plant family on the island. is plant does occur in coastal habitats but is rare in NF.
It seems unlikely A. fuscus would have success in nding patches of this host after introduc-
tion. Audisio (2002) reasoned that this specimen likely was mislabelled by the collector, L.
Reiche. We therefore remove this species from the faunal list for NF and for Canada.
46. Brassicogethes viridescens (Fabricius)
(Fig. 46, Map 41)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-2.4 mm, narrowly oval, subparallel medially, streamlined,
integument blackish with metallic greenish tint, legs and antennal bases reddish-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 61
brown, body densely and nely punctate, pubescence short and dense; pronotum as
wide as elytra at base, margins subparallel basally and slightly converging apically from
middle of disc; elytra about twice as long as wide, rounded at apex.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. ME (Hoebeke and Wheeler 1996b).
First Canadian records. Halifax, NS in 1945 (NSM); Sainte-Catherine (Portneuf),
QC in 1951 (LEMQ); and Charlottetown, PE in 1974 (CNCI).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species feeds on pollen of cruciferous plants. In Canada, it was col-
lected from the owers of wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum L. (Brassicaceae).
Comments. e biology and habits of this species are provided by Hoebeke and
Wheeler (1996b).
47. Genisthogethes carinulatus (Förster)
(Fig. 47, Map 42)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.7-3.0 mm, broadly oval, integument blackish, legs and
sometimes antennal bases reddish-brown, body densely and nely punctate, pubes-
cence short and dense; pronotum almost as wide as elytra at base, margins arcuate and
strongly converging apically from middle of disc; elytra slightly less than twice as long
as wide, truncated at apex and exposing part of pygidium.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Merritt, BC in 2012 (CNCI).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. Unknown.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
62
48. Meligethes atratus (Olivier)
(Fig. 48, Map 42)
Diagnosis. Body length 3.0-3.4 mm, moderately narrowly oval, integument dark
brown to blackish with legs and sometimes antennal bases reddish-brown, body dense-
ly and nely punctate, pubescence short and dense; pronotum at least as wide as elytra
at base, margins arcuate and strongly converging apically from base of disc; elytra
slightly longer than wide, rounded at apex and converging apically in basal third.
Native Range. Palaearctic; adventive in Africa (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Metlakatla, BC in 1915 (Hatch 1962).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Europe, this species is associated with the owers of Rosaceae
(Audisio 1993).
Comments. No specimens have been collected in Canada for a century. Specimens
from Metlakatla should be re-examined to conrm identity.
Subfamily NITIDULINAE Latreille
49. Aethina tumida Murray
(Fig. 49, Map 43)
Diagnosis. Body length 4.8-5.3 mm, broadly oval, integument glossy, dark brown
to blackish with lateral margins of pronotum and legs usually reddish-brown, body
densely and nely punctate, pubescence minute and dense; pronotum wider than
elytra at base, margins strongly converging apically from base of disc; elytra transverse,
truncated at apex, small portion of pygidium may be exposed.
Native range. Sub-Saharan Africa; adventive in Australia (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. MB?, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013, OMAFRA 2013).
is species was recorded from southern MB in 2002 and 2006 and deemed as not es-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 63
tablished (OMAFRA 2013); however, it is uncertain whether specimens collected from
MB in 2012 come from established populations. e species was also recorded from
southern AB in 2006 but was eradicated through control measures (OMAFRA 2013).
Distribution in USA. It is widely distributed in the USA and is especially successful
in warmer coastal states (OMAFRA 2013).
First Canadian records. Near MacGregor, MB in 2002 (CNCI) and Godmanchester,
QC in 2008 (CNCI).
First North American records. FL (unspecied locality) in 1998 (OMAFRA 2013).
Habitat data. is small hive beetle is a pest of European honey bee colonies. Larvae
feed on honey bee brood, pollen, honey and the wax comb. Larval defecation in the
honey comb causes the honey to ferment and spoil (OMAFRA 2013).
Comments. is species is invasive and should be closely monitored in southern and
coastal Canada. e biology of the species is well known (OMAFRA 2013).
50. Nitidula carnaria (Schaller)
(Fig. 50, Map 44)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-3.0 mm, narrowly elongate, dark brown to piceous, with
two large posterior and two smaller anterior pale spots on elytra, sometimes spots are
obsolete in densely pubescent specimens; pronotum transverse, width to length ratio
about 1.8:1.0, lateral margins arcuate, narrowly reexed, apex of disc slightly narrower
than base, hind angles obtuse, surface densely covered with small and minute punctures;
elytra exposing at least two abdominal tergites, surface nely and densely punctate.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is species
is reported for the rst time from SK (two locations in the southwest; David J. Larson,
personal communication).
Distribution in USA. CA, IN, MA, MI, NJ, NY, OR, PA, WA, WI (Parsons 1943,
Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Prince Edward County, ON in 1922 (CNCI); Quamichan, BC
in 1926 (CNCI); Sydney, NS in 1965 (CNCI); and Pointe-du-Lac, QC in 1968 (LEMQ).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
64
First North American records. NY in 1894 (Parsons 1943).
Habitat data. In NS, this species was found in association with a decomposing pig, Sus
scrofa L. (Majka and Cline 2006a).
51. Nitidula rupes (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 51, Map 45)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-4.0 mm, broad, subparallel, attened, piceous to black,
legs paler, integument moderately densely pubescent, punctures medium to minute;
pronotum slightly less than twice as wide as long, sides moderately arcuate, strongly
converging apically from middle of disc, margins moderately attened; elytra usually
covering entire abdomen, punctures ner and sparser than those of pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK, YT (Bous-
quet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. AK, CO, ID, IN, KS, ME, MI, MT, NH, NY, OR, PA, VA,
WA, WI (Parsons 1943, Downie and Arnett 1996, Majka and Cline 2006a, Klimasze-
wski et al. 2010, Bousquet et al. 2013).
First Canadian records. NT 65˚N (likely between 110˚ and 114˚W) in Canada be-
tween 1819 and 1825 (Kirby 1837); Cap Rouge, QC in 1861-1878 (CIQ); Sud-
bury, ON in 1889 (CNCI); Aweme, MB in 1908 (UMAN); Edmonton, AB in 1917
(CNCI); Fredericton, NB in 1928 (CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1930 (CNCI); Saska-
toon, SK in 1940 (CNCI); St. Johns, NF in 1949 (CNCI); Yellowknife, NT in 1949
(CNCI); and 14 km east of Dawson City, YT in 1962 (CNCI).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species is associated with carrion and bones (Downie and Arnett
1996). In NS, it was found in association with a dead pig (Majka and Cline 2006a).
52. Omosita colon (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 52, Map 46)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.2-3.5 mm, oval, sparsely pubescent, brown to piceous with
paler clypeus, legs, antennae, and margins of pronotum, venter dark rufous; pronotum
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 65
nearly twice as wide as long, sides curved and converging apically, more densely and
coarsely punctate than elytra; elytra coarsely punctate, lateral margins arcuate, apex
slightly truncate, small part of apical tergite exposed, with small basal spots, and large
apical yellowish or rufous spots enclosing small dark spots.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Australia and Mexico (Parsons 1943, Jelinek
and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NL, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK, (Majka
and Cline 2006a, Bousquet et al. 2013). is species is reported for the rst time from
LB (Happy Valley; MUN).
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed (Parsons 1943, Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Cap Rouge, QC from 1861-1878 (CIUL); Saint John, NB
in 1899 (NBM); London and Ridgeway, ON before 1900 (DEBU); Aweme, MB in
1904 (UMAN); Wilmot, NS in 1913 (LEMQ); Salmon Arm, BC in 1934 (UBC);
and Goulds, NF in 1953 (ACNL).
First North American records. Boston, MA from 1600-1740 (Bain 1998, Bain and
King 2011).
Habitat data. is species is found on dry carrion, bones, hides, fungi, and decaying
material (Downie and Arnett 1996). It usually feeds on carrion and only occasionally
has been reported as occurring in dwellings and empty granaries (Bousquet 1990a).
53. Omosita discoidea (Fabricius)
(Fig. 53, Map 47)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-3.2 mm, oblong ovate, sparsely pubescent, testaceous ex-
cept for piceous head, antennal club, and posterior third to fourth of elytra which has
several small pale spots; pronotum strongly transverse, strongly concave anteriorly and
arcuate laterally, with sides more converging apically than basally from middle of disc,
densely and coarsely punctate; elytra long, truncate at apex and usually exposing one
abdominal tergite.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in the neotropical region (Jelinek and Audisio
2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet
et al. 2013). is is the rst record from NT (Riley 1837).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
66
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed (Parsons 1943, Downie and Arnett 1996,
Majka and Cline 2006a).
First Canadian records. NT 65˚N (likely between 110˚ and 114˚W) in Canada be-
tween 1819 and 1825 (Kirby 1837); Saguenay, QC in 1880 (CIUL); Edmonton, AB
in 1914 (CNCI); Winnipeg, MB in 1915 (UMAN); Peachland, BC in 1919 (UMAN);
Rainy River District, ON in 1925 (CNCI); Bulyea, SK in 1944 (RSM); and near
Badger, NL in 1972 (CFCB).
First North American records. As above Pacic coast of North America before 1879
(Horn 1879); MA in 1899; NJ and NY in 1930 (Parsons 1943).
Habitat data. is species feeds on dried carrion, bones, hides, fungi, and decaying
vegetation (Downie and Arnett 1996). It has been found occasionally in dwellings
and empty granaries (Bousquet 1990a). In NS, it was reported on decaying pigs
and bones of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Majka and
Cline 2006a).
Comments. According to Parsons (1943), this species was probably introduced into
New Jersey and Maryland directly from Europe.
54. Soronia grisea (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 54, Map 48)
Diagnosis. Body length 4.7-5.2 mm, oblong ovate, sparsely pubescent, testaceous ex-
cept for legs, piceous and densely spotted dorsum of pronotum and central part of
elytra; pronotum strongly transverse, strongly concave anteriorly and arcuate laterally,
with sides strongly converging apically from base of disc, densely and coarsely punc-
tate; elytra long, rounded at apex and covering entire abdomen.
Native range. Palaearctic (Jelinek and Audisio 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NF, NS (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Corner Brook and Pasadena, NF in 1989 (McNamara 1992b)
and Sydney, NS in 2000 (NSNR).
First North American record. As above.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 67
Habitat data. In NS, one specimen was associated with Japanese walnut (Juglans ailan-
thifolia Carr.), a tree which was rst introduced into North America in 1870, and now
is widely spread (Majka and Cline 2006a). In Latvia, adults were collected feeding on
yeasty sap of birch, Betula pendula Roth (Salmane 2007).
Family CERYLONIDAE Bilberg
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-3.0 mm, broadly oval or elongate-robust, sometimes at-
tened, red to brown, dorsal surface hairless and glossy; head visible from above, anten-
nal insertions usually exposed, antennal club 1- or 2-segmented, and abrupt; prono-
tum lacking lateral margin; elytra nearly always striate; tarsal formula 4-4-4.
Subfamily MURMIDIINAE Jacquelin du Val
55. Murmidius ovalis (Beck)
(Fig. 55, Map 48)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.2-1.4 mm, oval, convex, brownish to reddish-brown, glossy;
pronotum broad and narrow, lateral margins converging apically; elytra with distinct
punctation in regular rows.
is species is distinctive by its habitus, and the presence of antennal cavities on ante-
rolateral margins of the pronotum.
Native range. Likely palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Downie and Arnett 1996).
Distribution in Canada. ON (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. AK, CA, DC, FL, IL, KS, LA, MO, NY (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Fort William, ON in 1939 (CNCI).
First North American records. Unknown.
Habitat data. e species was reported occasionally in stored food products in North
America where it does not damage the products directly because the adults and larvae
feed on moulds and yeasts. In Canada, most specimens have been collected from feed
mills (Bousquet 1990a). Downie and Arnett (1996) reported it from granaries and
warehouses and also from cut grass and leaves.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
68
Family ENDOMYCHIDAE Leach [the handsome fungus beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 4.0-8.0 mm, oval to elongate-oval or round, pubescence ne
or reduced, black with reddish or pale markings, glossy; head slightly deexed and
proganthous; antenna usually with 11 antennomeres, club consisting of 1-2 antenno-
meres; pronotum usually much broader than head with anterior angles prolonged and
partly enclosing head, borders margined; elytra entire and apically rounded, punctate,
epipleuron well developed; abdomen with 5-6 ventrites; procoxal cavities open behind;
mesosternum short, its cavities open or closed; metasternum with subcostal fovae in
many species; tarsal formula 4-4-4 or 3-3-3.
Subfamily ANAMORPHINAE Strohecker
56. Symbiotes gibberosus (Lucas)
(Fig. 56, Map 48)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.8-2.2 mm, oblong oval and subconvex, glossy, pubes-
cence sparse and moderately long and erect, uniformly reddish-brown or brownish-
yellow; antenna with 3-segmented prominent club; pronotum about twice as broad
as long, sides evenly curved to apical third and then strongly converging apically,
surface nely punctate, humeral angles with round depressions; elytra with sides
arcuate and converging posteriorly from basal third, apex rounded, surface with
rows of ne punctures.
Native range. Palaearctic (Rücker et al. 2007).
Distribution in Canada. ON (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, FL, NY, OH (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Near St. Williams, ON in 2007 (DEBU).
First North American records. Unknown but before 1996 (Downie and Arnett 1996).
Habitat data. In ON, specimens (DEBU) were collected in a forest near vernal pools.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 69
Subfamily MYCETINAE Jacquelin du Val
57. Mycetaea subterranea (Fabricius)
(Fig. 57, Map 49)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.8 mm, ovate and convex, glossy, rufo-testacous or red-
dish-brown integument with sparse, short and erect pubescence; pronotum broadest at
middle, with complete sublateral carina on each side of disc; elytra strongly narrowed
apically and slightly pointed at apex, with unequal pubescence and setae near vertical.
Sexes are externally similar.
Native range. Palaearctic (Rücker et al. 2007); adventive in a few tropical countries
and New Zealand (Bousquet 1990).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, CT, DC, MA, MD, MI, NY, OR, PA (Downie and
Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Ferryland, NF from 1621-1696 (Bain and Prévost 2010);
Quebec City, QC 1675-1699 (Bain and King 2011); Grimsby, ON before 1900
(DEBU); and Agassiz, BC in 1931 (CNCI).
First North American records. See above.
Habitat data. is species is occasionally associated with stored food products in gra-
naries, mills, warehouses, and cellars (Bousquet 1990a). It has not had a direct eect on
the products because it feeds on fungi. In the wild, it was also found in old tree trunks,
caves, and beehives (Bousquet 1990a). Downie and Arnett (1996) reported it from old
tree trunks, cellars, caves, granaries, and warehouses, where it probably feeds on mould.
Family COCCINELLIDAE Latreille [the ladybird beetles or ladybugs]
Diagnosis. Body length 0.8-11.0 mm, usually compact, broadly oval to nearly spheri-
cal, strongly convex dorsally and nearly at ventrally; often brightly coloured and spot-
ted: yellow, orange, and red with black markings or black with yellow to reddish mark-
ings; usually strongly glossy; head partly or completely concealed by pronotum and
deeply inserted into prothorax; antennae short with 8-11 antennomeres, club with 3-6
antennomeres; pronotum broader than head, transversely oval to quadrate, with deep or
shallow anterior emargination; elytra entire, glossy, nely to moderately punctate, non-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
70
striate, epipleural fold entire or obsolete; abdomen with 5-7 ventrites (visible sternites);
procoxal cavities usually closed behind; mesosternum short, trapezoidal to subquadrate;
metasternum long and broad; tarsal formula 4-4-4 (third tarsomere minute), or 3-3-3.
Subfamily COCCINELLINAE Latreille
58. Rhyzobius lophanthae (Blaisdell)
(Fig. 58, Map 49)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-2.8 mm, elongate oval and convex, moderately densely pu-
bescent, pubescence is of mixed types, on elytra forming wavy lines near suture, head
yellowish-brown, pronotum reddish-brown, elytra dark reddish-brown to dark brown,
sometimes elytra with faint metallic green tint, legs brown and tarsi paler; head partly con-
cealed under pronotum; antenna with 3-segmented club; pronotum strongly transverse
with anterior margin concave and lateral margins strongly converging in apical region.
Native range. Eastern palaearctic; adventive in Europe, Africa, Australia and the neo-
tropics (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, DE, MD, NM, TX (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Victoria, BC in 1988 (CNCI).
First North American records. CA in 1898 (Quayle 1941).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of scale insects.
Comments. is species was intentionally introduced into CA in 1898 to control
scales on citrus trees, and subsequently spread to other citrus-growing areas of the USA
(Quayle 1941).
59. Adalia bipunctata (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 59, Map 50)
Diagnosis. Body length 3.5-5.5 mm, oval and slightly convex, colour extremely varia-
ble, typically pronotum with median black spot and orange-red elytra with single black
discal spot on each elytron, number of spots varies from none to many, sometimes
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 71
elytra black with varying reddish to orange yellow spots; prosternum with distinct
lateral ridges and median area depressed; legs with apex of middle and hind tibiae each
with two spurs, tarsal claw with tooth at middle.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Africa, Australia and the neotropical (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT
(Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Saguenay, QC in 1874 (CIUL); Toronto, ON in 1885
(ROM); Saint John, NB in 1900 (CNCI); Gull Lake, AB in 1901 (UASM); Wey-
burn, SK in 1901 (UASM); Trail, BC in 1909 (UASM); Granville Ferry, NS in 1909
(NSAC); Aweme, MB in 1912 (NOFC); Mount Herbert, PE in 1922; Cameron Bay,
NT in 1937 (CNCI); Howley, NF in 1942 (DEBU); and Dawson City, YT in 1949
(CNCI).
First North American records. Unknown.
Habitat data. is species is a predator of small soft-bodied insects.
Comments. Given its wide distribution in Canada even a century ago, this species was
likely accidentally introduced into Canada well before the 1870s.
60. Aphidecta obliterata (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 60, Map 54)
Diagnosis. Body length 3.5-5.0 mm, form elongate-oval and moderately convex,
colour variable, elytra yellowish-orange with suused darkened areas, pronotum usu-
ally lighter with M-shaped median black patch; apex of clypeus broadly and feebly
emarginated, anterolateral angle produced forward; pronotum and elytra with lateral
margins explanate; prosternum with intercoxal process feebly convex, slightly ridged
laterally, lacking carina; mesosternum with apical margin truncate; legs with apex
of middle and hind tibiae lacking spurs, tarsal claw with large, subquadrate basal
tooth; postcoxal line on rst abdominal sternite complete; male genitalia symmetrical
(Gordon 1985, page 841, Figs. 679 c-f); female genitalia with infundibulum (Gor-
don1985, page 842, Fig. 680c).
Native range. Palaearctic (Kovář 2007).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
72
Distribution in Canada. BC (Humble 1994).
Distribution in USA. NC (Amman 1966).
First Canadian records. is species was released in Victoria, BC between 1960 and
1969 (Schooley et al. 1984) and was rst recovered there in 1987 (Humble 1994).
First North American records. is species rst established at Mt. Mitchell, NC fol-
lowing releases in 1960 and 1963 (Amman 1966).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids
and scales. In BC, it was found associated with balsam woolly adelgid on balsam r,
hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, on western hemlock and green spruce
aphid, Elatobium abietinus (Walker), on Sitka spruce (Humble 1994).
Comments. is species was not recovered at the Victoria, BC release sites during the
1960-1969 release period (Schooley et al. 1984) nor during surveys at the release sites
in 1971, 1974 and 1978 (Humble 1994). is underscores that long term monitoring
may be required to assess establishment of introductions of biocontrol agents.
61. Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus
(Fig. 61, Map 51)
Diagnosis. Body length 6.0-7.8 mm, oval and convex, head black with two well sepa-
rated pale spots, anterior margin of pronotum black at middle and with two larger
pale spots near anterior shoulder, elytra reddish-brown with common black scutellar
spot and with three additional spots, one lateral before middle, one at middle of disc,
and one lateral and subapical, number of spots may be somewhat variable, integument
glossy; antennal club 3-segmented, two basal segments small, subquadrate to slightly
elongate, last segment elongate and swollen; pronotum strongly transverse as wide as
about two-thirds of maximum width of elytra; elytra four times longer than pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Africa and the Orient (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, NT, ON, PE, QC, SK
(Bousquet et al. 2013). is species is newly recorded from LB (Hopedale and Labra-
dor City; ACNL, CFCB).
Distribution in USA. Widely distributed (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. e earliest provincial records are: Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC
in 1965 (LEMQ); Kinbrook Island Provincial Park, AB in 1970 (John Acorn, personal
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 73
communication); Fredericton, NB in 1972 (NSM); Ness Lake. BC in 1990 (Humble
1991; PFC); Lac du Bonnet, MB in 1989 (UMAN); Marystown, NF in 1981 (ACNL);
Labrador City, LB in 1981 (ACNL); Glenhilme, NS in 1982 (NSAC); Daring Lake, NT
in 2010 (James Miskelly, personal communication); Pukaskwa National Park, ON in
1975 (DEBU); Charlottetown, PE in 1978 (ACPE); Gainsborough, SK in 1989 (RSM).
First North American records. See above. In the USA, the rst established population
was discovered in Bergen Co., NJ in 1973 (Angelet and Jacques 1975).
Habitat data. e seven-spotted ladybug is a predator of small, soft-bodied insects. It
inhabits many dierent habitats, but is uncommon in forests.
Comments. is species was intentionally introduced as a biocontrol agent into North
America numerous times from 1956 to 1971 (Gordon 1985), but did not establish.
e population that eventually established in NJ was the result of an accidental intro-
duction (Gordon 1985). It is an active ier and disperses well. It easily displaces native
ladybug species, a cause for conservation concern (Acorn 2007).
62. Coccinella undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Linnaeus
(Fig. 62, Map 52)
Diagnosis. Body length 4.0-5.0 mm, elongate and moderately convex, head black
with two well-separated pale spots, pronotum and legs usually black, pronotum with
two larger pale spots near anterior shoulders, elytra yellowish-red and spotted, often
with six distinctive black spots on each elytron, number of spots may be variable,
integument semi-glossy; antennal club 3-segmented, two basal segments small, sub-
quadrate to slightly elongate, last segment elongate and swollen; pronotum moderately
transverse as wide as two-thirds of maximum width of elytra; elytra about 3.5 times
longer than pronotum.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Australia (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, LB, NB, NS, NF, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
is species is newly reported from LB (near Wabush and Lanse-au-Loup; MUN).
Distribution in USA. It is distributed along the American eastern seaboard from ME to
NJ and is also in IN, OH and the Pacic Northwest (OR, WA) (Watson 1979, Wheeler
and Hoebeke 1981, Downie and Arnett 1996, Majka and McCorquodale 2006, 2010).
First Canadian records. Brackley Beach and Dalvay House, PE in 1940 (CNCI); Ka-
mouraska, QC in 1940 (CIQ); Halifax, NS in 1945 (NSM); NF (three localities in the
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
74
west) in 1949 (MUN); Ramsayville, ON in 1955 (LEMQ); Moncton, NB in 1976
(UNB); South Pender Island, BC in 1979 (UBC); and near Wabush, LB in 1981 (MUN).
First North American records. Boston, MA in 1911 (Schaeer 1912).
Habitat data. e eleven-spotted lady bird is a predator of soft-bodied insects. It is
found mainly in open habitats.
Comments. is species was unintentionally introduced into North America. e dis-
junct distribution of this species in North America suggests two separate introduction
events, one in the east and one in the Pacic Northwest.
63. Harmonia axyridis (Pallas)
(Fig. 63, Map 53)
Diagnosis. Body length 5.6-5.8 mm, broadly oval and convex, reddish-yellow with
blackish spots, pronotum reddish-yellow with irregularly shaped blackish spot in cen-
tral part of disc, elytra reddish-yellow, usually with nine blackish spots on each elytron,
size and number of spots is variable, legs reddish-yellow to brown.
Native range. Eastern palaearctic; adventive in Europe and the Orient (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet
et al. 2013). is species is newly recorded from AB (Medicine Hat; John Acorn, per-
sonal communication).
Distribution in USA. Most of the eastern USA, south to LA and MS; CA, MT, OR
and WA (Foley et al. 2009, Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
First Canadian records. Kentville, NS in 1983 (ACNS); Gabriola, BC in 1994
(CNCI); Ontario (many locations) in 1994; Montreal, QC in 1994 (CMNC); Freder-
icton, NB in 1995 (CNCI); Harrington, PE in 1998 (ACPE); Kelligrews, NF in 2000
(Hicks et al. 2010); Carman, MB in 2001 (UMAN); and near Maple Creek, SK in
2011 (David J. Larson, personal communication).
First North American records. Following intentional introductions in 1978-1981,
it became established in LA in 1988 and in MS in 1990 (Gordon 1985, Gordon and
Vandenburg 1991, Hoebeke and Wheeler 1996a, Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of aphids (Hicks et al. 2010).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 75
Comments. is species has dispersed rapidly in North America and populations can
be very high. Its dispersal has likely been aided by humans as the species is commonly
used in greenhouses to control aphids. ere are some concerns that the high abun-
dances of this species may have negative impacts on native species of coccinellids. e
species is also sometimes a nuisance as it can damage fruit and form large overwinter-
ing aggregations in bee hives and in homes (Foley et al. 2009).
64. Hippodamia variegata (Goeze)
(Fig. 64, Map 54)
Diagnosis. Body length 4.4-5.0 mm, elongate-oval and moderately convex, male with
head yellow and vertex black, female with head yellow and vertex and large frontal spot
black, pronotum of male with anterior border of black area deeply emarginate medially
and contrasting with yellow margins, pronotum of female black with anterior and lateral
borders and small lateral spot on each side yellow, elytra of both sexes orange with 5-8 black
spots on each elytron, with scutellar, posthumeral, and two postscutellar spots often absent.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Africa and the Orient (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NB, NF NS, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is newly recorded from BC (Penticton; CBU) and NF (Carbonear; UNB).
Distribution in USA. CT, MA, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VT (Klimaszewski et al.
2010, Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
First Canadian records. In and near Montreal, QC in 1984 (Gordon 1987); Monc-
ton, NB in 1987 (UNB); LeBreton Flats, ON in 1989 (CNCI); Harrington, PE in
1991 (ACPE); Carbonear, NF in 1992 (UNB); Kingsburg, NS in 1984 (NSNR); and
Penticton, BC in 2009 (CBU).
First North American records. Introduced to AZ, CA, FL, GA and NC from 1957-
1958 (Gordon and Vandenburg 1991).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of soft-bodied insects. In NS, it was found in
coastal habitats (Majka and McCorquodale 2010). In QC, adults were found in aban-
doned elds (Gordon 1987).
Comments. It was introduced into North America to control aphids of agricultural crops,
including Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordivilko) (Gordon and Vandenberg
1991). It appears that the population in BC may be the result of a separate introduction.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
76
65. Propylaea quatuordecimpunctata (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 65, Map 55)
Diagnosis. Body length 3.5-5.2 mm, oval and convex, head of male yellow with black
vertex, head of female with black spot on clypeus, pronotum in both sexes with large
medial and irregular-shaped black area, elytra variable, usually yellowish-orange with
fourteen irregular and angular spots which fuse in dierent combinations, rarely elytra
black with some pale spots.
Native range. Palaearctic (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. MA, ME, NH, NY RI, VT (Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
First Canadian records. Sainte-Foy, QC in 1968 (CIUL); Debert, NS in 1989
(NSNR); Sherwood, PE in 1989 (ACPE); LeBreton Flats, ON in 1990 (CNCI); and
Fredericton, NB in 1992 (ACNB).
First North American records. As above; Grand Isle Co., VT in 1984 (Dysart 1988).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of soft-bodied insects. It was intentionally
introduced into North America to control the Russian wheat aphid (Hoebeke and
Wheeler 1996a).
Comments. is species was rst introduced into the Great Plains states in 1968,
followed by introductions in the eastern USA in 1989-1990. However, the rst estab-
lished population was discovered in Sainte-Foy, QC in 1968, likely as a result of an
accidental introduction via trans-Atlantic shipping (Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
It is likely that the current populations of this species in southeastern Canada and the
eastern USA originated from this accidental introduction.
Subfamily SCYMNINAE Mulsant
66. Scymnus impexus Mulsant
(Fig. 66, Map 56)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-2.5 mm, elongate-oval and moderately convex, uni-
formly reddish-brown, pubescence short, yellowish, moderately dense and forming
wavy pattern on posterior part of elytra; head with large eyes; pronotum trans-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 77
verse, at base about two-thirds of maximum width of elytra, margins strongly
converging apically.
Native range. Palaearctic (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CT, MI, NY, PA (Klimaszewski et al. 2010). It was introduced
into NC but did not establish. Introductions into OR in 1960 and 1962 (Gordon
1985) did not likely persist as there have been no recent collections.
First Canadian records. is species was intentionally introduced into NB, NS, and
NF from 1951-1955 and 1962-1966 but did not persist beyond 5 years (Clarke and
Brown 1961, Gordon 1976, 1985, CIBC 1971, Majka and McCorquodale 2006,
2010). It was also intentionally released at three locations in the lower mainland of BC
from 1960-1968, was recovered following winter at two locations (Mount Seymour
and Seymour Valley), and is considered established. At Seymour Valley site, the species
was repeatedly collected up to 10 years post release when annual sampling was discon-
tinued (Harris and Dawson 1979).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species is predatory on soft-bodied insects (aphids, adelgids, scales,
etc.). It was intentionally introduced into NB (1962-1964, 1966), NF (1959-1961,
1966), NS (1963-1964, 1966) and BC (1960, 1963, 1965-1966, 1968) for control
of the balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae (Ratzeburg) (Harris and Dawson 1979,
Schooley et al. 1984, Majka and McCorquodale 2006).
Comments. is species is not currently considered to be established in the wild in
Atlantic Canada (Majka and McCorquodale 2006). As well, no recent specimens have
been collected in BC despite targeted work on balsam woolly adelgid there (L. Hum-
ble, personal communication). e most recent specimen collected in North America
is from BC in 1978 (Harris and Dawson 1979).
67. Scymnus suturalis unberg
(Fig. 67, Map 56)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-1.9 mm, elongate-oval and moderately convex, mod-
erately densly pubescent and punctate, pubescence yellowish and on elytra directed
obliquely posteriorly from suture, head blackish, pronotum blackish with reddish an-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
78
terior angles, elytra reddish-brown with black basal and sutural section of disc, legs
reddish-brown; pronotum much narrower than elytra, at base less than two-thirds of
maximum width of elytra; elytra oval and rounded at apex.
Native range. Palaearctic (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NS, QC (McNamara 1992a, Majka and McCorquodale
2010, Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CT, MA, ME, MI, NY, PA, RI, VA (Klimaszewski et al. 2010,
Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
First Canadian records. Oka, QC in 1983 (McNamara 1992a); Halifax, NS 1993
(Hoebeke and Wheeler 1996a, Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
First North American records. Saginaw Co., MI in 1961 (Gordon 1985).
Habitat data. is species preys on aphids and adelgids found on conifers (Majka and
McCorquodale 2010). In NS, it was found on Scots pine (Pinus silvestris L.), and jack
pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) (Majka and McCorquodale 2010).
Comments. It was presumably inadvertently introduced into NS with conifer nursery
stock (Majka and McCorquodale 2010). Also, it is believed to have been inadvertently
introduced into other areas in eastern North America, including QC (Majka and Mc-
Corquodale 2010). Gordon (1985) reports an introduction from Germany to MI in
1961 that apparently established.
68. Stethorus punctillum Weise
(Fig. 68, Map 57)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.4-1.6 mm, elongate-oval, black with antennae, mouthparts
and legs usally brownish-yellow or reddish-brown, basal three-quarters of femorae
brown, body with pubescence short, semierect and yellowish-white; antennae short
and clubbed.
Native range. Palaearctic (Kovář 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is recorded for the rst time from AB (Taber; John Acorn, personal communi-
cation) and SK (three locations in the southeast; David Larson, personal communica-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 79
tion). Although previously recorded from MB (Bousquet et al. 2013), we were not able
to locate a specimen or a published locality record.
Distribution in USA. MA, MI, NH, NY, OH, PA, VT, WI (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Leamington, ON in 1931 (CNCI); Lulu Island, BC in 1950
(CNCI); Saint-Nicolas (Lévis), QC in 1993 (CIQ); and Taber, AB in 2001 (John
Acorn, personal communication).
First North American records. As above; Framingham, MA before 1950 (Brown 1950).
Habitat data. is species is a predator of soft-bodied insects (aphids, adelgids, scales, etc.).
Family CORYLOPHIDAE LeConte [the minute hooded beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 0.6-2.3 mm, form usually oval and depressed, nearly hemi-
spherical or slightly elongate, colour usually testaceous to piceous, some with paler
pronotum or spots on elytra; head small, quadrate to elongate, and usually completely
concealed by expanded pronotum forming a hood anteriorly; antennae with 9-11 an-
tennomeres, and with 3-segmented club; pronotum with the anterior margin emargin-
ated or entire and usually completely covering the head; elytra mostly truncate apically,
exposing the apex of abdomen; abdomen with six ventrites, basal ventrite very long and
bearing subparallel femoral lines; procoxae from short and globose to elongate, their
cavities closed internally; mesocoxae variable in shape, round to elongate, their cavities
closed internally; metacoxae widely separated; legs with tarsal formula 4-4-4, tarsi with
rst and second articles large, third very small and fourth narrow and elongate.
Subfamily CORYLOPHINAE LeConte
69. Orthoperus atomus (Gyllenhal)
(Fig. 69, Map 59)
Diagnosis. Body length 0.6-0.8 mm, oval and convex, strongly glossy with minute,
barely visible and sparse punctation, body uniformly yellowish-red to reddish-brown
with slightly darker, asymmetrical antennal clubs; pronotum sinuate at base and arcu-
ate laterally without strong delimitation between anterior and lateral margins; elytra
entirely covering abdomen and rounded apically.
Native Range. Palaearctic (Bowestead 2007).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
80
Distribution in Canada. BC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. OR, WA (Hatch 1957).
First Canadian records. Steelhead, BC in 1935 (UBC).
First North American records. See above; OR and WA (unspecied localities) before
1957 (Hatch 1957).
Habitat data. In Poland, it was sifted from mouldy hay, found in fungi on an ash tree,
sifted from willow leaf litter, found under the bark of Populus, and collected from a
wildlife feeder (Ruta et al. 2010).
70. Sericoderus lateralis (Gyllenhal)
(Fig. 70, Map 58)
Diagnosis. Body length 0.9-1.2 mm, oblong-oval and convex, slightly glossy, more so
on pronotum, yellowish to reddish-brown, anterior margin of pronotum usually with
nebulous dark spot, moderately densly pubescent and punctate, pubescence yellowish-
brown; antennae clubbed, club slightly asymmetrical; pronotum at base as wide as
elytra, margins strongly converging apically, base sinuate; elytra with apex truncate and
exposing pygidium.
Native range. Probably palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Bowestead 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). Although
previously recorded from MB, we were unable to locate a specimen or published local-
ity record.
Distribution in USA. FL, IN, MA, ME, MI, NY, OR, WA (Downie and Arnett 1996,
Klimaszewski et al. 2010).
First Canadian records. Grimsby, ON before 1900 (DEBU); Peachland, BC in 1919
(UBC); Montreal, QC in 1969 (CNCI); and Pictou, NS in 2002 (NSNR).
First North American records. Near Corvallis, OR in 1949 (Walters and Roth 1950).
Habitat data. In NS, it was found feeding on mouldy corncobs in a compost heap
(Majka and Cline 2006b). In Oregon, it was collected (identied as Arthrolips decolor
(LeConte)) in the nest of a woodrat (Walters and Roth 1950). In Europe, it occurs,
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 81
often in very large numbers, on mouldy plant remains in warm places, especially in
compost and grass cuttings (Bowestead 2007).
Family LATRIDIIDAE Erichson [the minute brown scavenger beetles]
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-3.0 mm, elongate to elongate-oval, attened to slightly
convex, ranging in colour from uniformly pale testaceous, to piceus, rarely bicolored,
surface glabrous and rugosely sculptured and/or carinate [Latridiinae] to pubescent
and reasonably smooth [Corticariinae]; head prognathous, oval to trapezoidal, not con-
cealed from above, occasionally with carinae or foveae; clypeus separated from frons by
distinct suture and on a lower plane [Latridiinae] to clypeus separated from frons by
an indistinct suture on the same plane [Corticariinae]; eyes usually protuberant and
coarsely faceted; antennal bases widely separated, antennae with 10-11 antennomeres
with a club bearing 2-3 sensillae; pronotum wider than head and variously shaped,
from trapezoidal or highly constricted medially to hemispherical or completely oval,
punctation ne to coarse, often with carinae; prosternum convex, occasionally foveate;
prosternal process complete to lacking, keel-like in some genera; procoxal cavities cir-
cular, narrowly separated to contiguous, usually closed behind; elytral base wider than
base of pronotum, oval, usually covering entire abdomen, apex usually rounded, punc-
tate in regular striae or irregularly punctate, often with interstriae raised or carinate;
hind wings variously developed, from completely absent to fully developed; abdomen
with with 5-6 visible sternites, occasionally with a fovea present between metacoxae or
in middle of rst ventrite; many species exhibit sexual dimorphism with males hav-
ing either enlarged profemur, development of a median tibial tooth, or tarsal formula
usually 2-3-3, females exhibit simple femora and tibia with 3-3-3 tarsal formula; male
genitalia variable, usually composed of a large, simple, and curved tube.
Subfamily LATRIDIINAE Erichson
71. Adistemia watsoni (Wollaston)
(Figs. 71, 92a, b, Map 59)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.0-1.7 mm, elongate and narrow, slightly dorso-ventrally
attened, colour variable, from uniformly pale testaceous to rufo-testaceous; head
elongate with small trapezoidal clypeus and large bilobed labrum; eyes small, com-
posed of 6-8 irregularly placed coarse facets; pronotum narrowly elongate, trapezoi-
dal, widest near apex, slightly wider than maximum head width, strongly convergent
basally; elytra elongate oval with 8 striae, intervals 3 and 7 carinate, coarsely and dis-
tinctly punctate; front coxae contiguous; mesosternum, metasternum and abdominal
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
82
sternites coarsely and distinctly punctate; metasternum fused to rst abdominal ster-
nite, abdomen appearing 4-segmented; aedeagus a simple curved tube, apex attened
and broadly rounded, base with two long, slender, more or less parallel basal apophyses
which are longer than the apical tube (Figs. 92a, b).
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Africa, New Zealand, and the neotropics (Chile,
Honduras, Mexico, Venezuela) (Watt 1969, Downie and Arnett 1996, Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. DC (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Ottawa, ON in 1974 (LFC) and Lac des Étangs and Sainte-
Foy, QC in 1999 (LFC).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. It is found in stored food products where it feeds on spores and hyphae
of moulds (Hoebeke and Wheeler 1983).
72. Cartodere bifasciata (Reitter)
(Fig. 72, Map 59)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.0-2.1 mm, reddish-brown with blackish spots on pronotum
and elytra; antennal club 3-segmented with segments narrowly elongate; pronotum
with constriction in basal third; elytra broadly oval with angular shoulders and without
distinct gibbosities or depressions, alternate intervals feebly convex but not carinate;
aedeagus similar to C. constricta except the apex is slightly more sinuate and overall
generally wider and more stout (based on internet photo found at http://www.galerie-
insecte.org/galerie/ref-117144.htm; accessed 12 September 2014).
e unique coloration and form of the elytra distinguish this species.
Native range. Australia; adventive in Europe, Morocco and Turkey (Johnson 2007,
Majka et al. 2009).
Distribution in Canada. NS, PE (Majka et al. 2009). Although previously recorded
from PE, we were unable to locate a specimen or published record.
Distribution in USA. No known records.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 83
First Canadian records. Halifax, NS in 1989 (Majka et al. 2009; NSMC).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Europe, it is found in habitats ranging from forested to grassy ter-
rain, with slight preference for open habitats and re-damaged woodland (Majka et al.
2009). It is found in decaying organic material such as litter, mouldy bark, wood, hay,
and straw debris (Reemer 2003, Majka et al. 2009).
Comments. is species was introduced into Europe (Germany) in tobacco imported
from Australia (Majka 2009 and references therein). It is likely that the introduction
into Canada came from Europe rather than from Australia.
73. Cartodere constricta (Gyllenhal)
(Figs. 73, 93a, b, Map 60)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.6 mm, uniformly reddish-brown, often with darker
fore-body; antenna with 2-segmented club; pronotum strongly constricted in basal
fourth; elytra broadly oval without gibbosities or impressions; aedeagus consists of a
single tube, acutely reexed to approximately 60°, apex broadly rounded and attened,
basal spicule simple (Figs. 93a, b).
e combination of a 2-segmented antennal club and a unique pronotal shape are
diagnostic for this species.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Majka et al. 2009).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT
(Bousquet et al. 2013). is species is newly reported from LB (Muskrat Falls and
Middle Brook; MUN) and YT (Dawson City; DEBU).
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, FL, ID, IL, IN, MA, MI, MN, NC, NH, OR, RI, SC,
VA, WA, WY (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1916 (CNCI); Montreal, QC in 1929
(CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1933 (UBC); Belleville and Mer Bleue, ON in 1936
(CNCI); Halifax, NS in 1951 (CNCI); Rouleau, SK in 1953 (CNCI); Lacombe, AB
in 1953 (NOFC); and Dawson City, YT in 1988 (DEBU) (Majka et al. 2009).
First North American records. IL (unspecied locality) before 1855 (LeConte 1855).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
84
Habitat data. is species is frequently associated with stored food products, includ-
ing grain (Bousquet 1990a). It is also found in houses, feed mills, grain elevators, and
occurs in vegetative detritus such as herbaceous vegetation, straw, and grass (Hatch
1961). It was recorded in Canadian cargo ships carrying wheat (Aitken 1975). e
species is also frequently found in native habitats such as forests (Majka et al. 2009).
74. Cartodere nodifer (Westwood)
(Figs. 74, 94a, b, Map 61)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.7 mm, dark brown with reddish fore-body and reddish
patches on elytra; antennal club 3-segmented; pronotum strongly constricted behind
the middle; elytra broadly oval, surface distinctly wavy, intervals 3, 5 and 7 strongly
carinate, the third interval with transverse, shallow depressions and a longitudinal
swelling on the apical third; aedeagus consists of a single tube, acutely reexed to ap-
proximately 80°, apex cuspidate and narrowly rounded, basal spicule bifurcate both
basally and apically (Figs. 94a, b).
e elytral character is unique among species of this genus. is species is atypical
compared to other Cartodere in that there is external sexual dimorphism; males dier
from females in having a large accessory tooth along the inside edge of the metatibia
near the apex, whereas females have simple metatibia.
Native range. Likely of palaearctic origin; now cosmopolitan (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB, NS, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. CA, NC, NH, OR, RI, VA, WA (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1919 (CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1926
(UBC); and Kentville, NS in 1952 (Majka et al. 2009).
First North American records. CA, OR, VA, WA before 1894 (Hamilton 1894, Fall
1899).
Habitat data. is species is frequently associated with stored food products such as
grains, but it also occurs under bark, and in mouldy wood, leaf compost, vegetable
refuse, moss, stacks of wood, haystacks, mouldy corn cobs and corn husks, cellars,
nests of Hymnoptera and wood rats (Hinton 1945, Hatch 1962, Bousquet 1990a,
Webster et al. 2012). It feeds on lamentous fungi (Lawrence and Newton 1980). It
was also recorded in Canadian cargo ships carrying wheat (Aitken 1975). In Atlantic
Canada, this species was collected in forests using ight intercept traps (Majka et al.
2009, Webster et al. 2012).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 85
Comments. e population on the west coast of North America may represent an
independent introduction event.
75. Dienerella argus (Reitter)
(Figs. 75, 95a, b, Map 62)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-2.6 mm, narrowly oval and reddish-brown; antennal club
3-segmented; eyes moderately large and occupy hind angles of head so that the temples
appear absent; head broad and produced in front of eyes; pronotum broadest in apical
third, lateral margin slightly serrated, two distinct fovea present near posterior angles of
disc; aedeagus consists of a single reexed tube which is somewhat dorso-ventrally at-
tened, apex narrowly pointed and slightly attened, base with two long, slender, con-
vergent basal apophyses which are subequal in length to the apical tube (Figs. 95a, b).
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. MB, NB, NS, ON, PE, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is reported for the rst time from MB (Wanless and Pilot Mound; CNCI,
UMAN).
Distribution in USA. CA, MI, MT, OR (Fall 1899, Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Ottawa, ON in 1932 (CNCI); Wanless, MB in 1960 (CNCI);
Halifax, NS in 1970 (NSMC); Bunbury, PE in 1970 (CNCI); Vanier, QC in 1980
(CNCI).
First North American records. Pomona, CA; Detroit, MI; Bonner, MT; and Le
Grande, OR before 1899 (Fall 1899).
Habitat data. is species is found in association with stored grain, in ground cereals,
on strips of drying yucca pith, in drug stores and in wheat elds (Fall 1899, Hinton
1945, Bousquet 1990a).
76. Dienerella costulata (Reitter)
(Figs. 76, 96a, b, Map 63)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.1-2.3 mm, oval, light rusty-brown; antennal club 3-seg-
mented, segments elongate; eyes very small near base of head but distant from poste-
rior angles of head, consisting of 4-6 facets; elytra intervals 3, 5 and 7 slightly carinate,
stria 8 punctate on apical half; aedeagus consists of a single reexed tube, apex nar-
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
86
rowly pointed and slightly attened, base with two long, slender and parallel sub-basal
apophyses which are subequal in length to the apical tube (Figs. 96a, b).
Native range. Western palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. MB, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. MA, MI, PA (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Winnipeg, MB in 1916 (CNCI); Toronto, ON in 1929
(CNCI); Montreal, QC in 1938 (CNCI); and Charlottetown, PE in 1986 (ACPE).
First North American records. Lowell, MA; Detroit, MI; and PA (unspecied local-
ity) before 1899 (Fall 1899).
Habitat data. It was collected in granaries, cellars, and drug stores, and is associated
with various dried food products (Fall 1899, Hinton 1945).
Comments. e genitalia of the three male specimens of putative D. costulata from
North America that were examined had a basally forked ventral spicule, which has not
been observed in specimens from the Palaearctic region. us, these specimens may be
a dierent species. A thorough study of this genus is required to ascertain whether D.
costulata is present in North America.
77. Dienerella liformis (Gyllenhal)
(Figs. 77, 97a, b, Map 64)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-2.5 mm, narrowly oval, uniformly rusty-brown; antennal
club 3-segmented, basal articles transverse; eyes small and coarsely faceted; pronotum
broadest in apical third, basal two-thirds of margin straight and entire; elytra with in-
tervals 3, 5 and 7 at, seven punctate striae present in apical half of each elytron, striae
5 and 6 converge near middle and then separate again basally; aedeagus consisting of a
single reexed tube, apex narrowly pointed and highly attened and somewhat longer
than in other species, base with two long, slender and parallel basal apophyses which
are subequal to or slightly longer than the length of the apical tube (Figs. 97a, b).
e unique shape of the pronotum and the elytra with attened elytral intervals
and coalescing striae 5 and 6 diagnose this species.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 87
Distribution in Canada. MB, NS, ON, QC, SK, (Bousquet et al. 2013). is species
is recorded for the rst time from ON (Vineland; DEBU). is species was removed
from the faunal lists of NB and PE by Majka et al. (2009) as earlier records were based
on misidentied specimens.
Distribution in USA. MO, PA (LeConte 1855, Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Vineland, ON in 1939 (DEBU); Dominion City and Win-
kler, MB in 1964 (UMAN); Quebec, QC in 1972 (UMAN); and New Ross, NS in
1989 (NSMC).
First North American records. Unspecied locality in MO and Philadelphia, PA be-
fore before 1855 (LeConte 1855).
Habitat data. It is commonly found in granaries, grain elevators, old our barrels,
wine cellars, and homes (Hinton 1945, Bousquet 1990a). In NS, it was reported from
stored grain on a farm (Majka et al. 2009). is species feeds on lamentous fungi
including slime moulds (Reticulariceae) (Hinton 1945).
78. Dienerella lum (Aubé)
(Figs. 78, 98a, b, Map 65)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.5-2.7 mm, narrowly oval, uniformly dark rusty-brown; an-
tennal club 2-segmented, with basal article transverse and last elongate; eyes large and
coarsely faceted; head with median longitudinal impression; pronotum broadest in
apical fourth, slightly constricted in basal third, with broad median oval depression in
anterior half of the disc; aedeagus consists of a single reexed tube which is somewhat
dorso-ventrally attened, apex twisted dorso-ventrally, very narrowly pointed and at-
tened, base with two slender, slightly convergent, basal apophyses which are approxi-
mately one-third the length of the apical tube (Figs. 98a, b).
e combination of the 2-segmented antennal club, large eyes, and unique head
and pronotal shape distinguish this species.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Greenland, Australia and the neotropics (Böch-
er 1988, Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NF, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013).
is species is newly recorded from AB (three localities; NOFC). Although previously
reported from SK, we could not locate any specimens or published locality records.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
88
Distribution in USA. AR, CA, CO, MI, NY, WA (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Ottawa, ON before 1899 (Fall 1899); Winnipeg, MB in 1919
(CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1951 (UBC); North of Maycroft, AB in 1962 (NOFC);
Halifax, NS in 1966 (NSMC); and Vanier, QC in 1980 (CIQ).
First North American records. CO and NY before 1899 (Fall 1899).
Habitat data. is species is found in association with stored grains and in mouldy plant
and animal material (Böcher 1988). It feeds on hyphae and spores of lamentous fungi
(Ustilaginaceae, Tilletiaceae, Ascomycetes, Physaraceae, Lycoperdaceae), and spores of
slime moulds (Hinton 1945, Lawrence and Newton 1980). It has recently been reported
as a potential pest of air-conditioning and refrigeration systems (Carlton 1988).
79. Dienerella rucollis (Marsham)
(Figs. 79, 99a, b, Map 66)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.1-2.2 mm, oval, dark rusty-brown with paler fore-body;
antennal club 3-segmented, with segments elongate; eyes small with about 20 coarse
facets; head evenly broad in front of eyes; pronotum broadest in apical third, strongly
constricted in basal third, sides of pronotum are often covered with a waxy exudate;
elytra with six deeply punctured striae, intervals 4 and 5 slightly carinate, margins
slightly serrate especially in basal half; aedeagus consisting of a single robust tube,
apex strongly recurved and dorso-ventrally twisted, narrowly rounded and slightly
attened, base with two slender, convergent basal apophyses which are about half the
length of the apical tube (Figs. 99a, b).
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in North and South America and New Zealand
(Archibald and Chalmers 1983, Bousquet 1990a, Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC (Majka et al. 2009, Webs-
ter et al. 2012, Bousquet et al. 2013). is is the rst record of this species from PE
(Bunbury, UMAN).
Distribution in USA. IN, MA, NY, OR (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Grimsby, ON before 1900 (DEBU); Salmon Arm and Vic-
toria, BC in 1932 (CNCI); Grafton, NS in 1951 (NSAC); Montreal, QC in 1955
(CNCI); Bunbury, PE in 1971 (UMAN); and Portugal Cove, NF in 1980 (MUN).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 89
First North American records. Central and southern USA (unspecied localities) be-
fore 1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. is species is found in granaries, grain elevators, our mills, houses,
museums, haystacks, and barns in association with stored grains, dried dung, bird
nests, refuse, fungi, and mouldy paper (Hinton 1945). In NB, a large series was col-
lected in a bulk milk tank (Webster et al. 2012).
Comments. e genitalia of the two male specimens of putative D. rucollis from
North America that were examined had a basally ne, forked ventral spicule, which
has not been observed in specimens from the Palaearctic region. us, these specimens
may be a dierent species. A thorough study of this genus is required to ascertain
whether D. rucollis is present in North America.
e disjunct distribution of this species in North America suggests two separate
introduction events, one in the east and one in the Pacic Northwest.
80. Enicmus histrio Joy & Tomlin
(Fig. 80, Map 67)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.4-1.7 mm, usually uniformly reddish-brown; antennal club
3-segmented, basal two segments subquadrate to slightly transverse; pronotum with
lateral margins parallel or weakly convex, not broader at middle than at apex or base;
elytra broadly oval with eight striae with deep and large punctures, intervals slightly
carinate, stria 6 not reaching elytral base, separated by slightly elevated impunctate
area; aedeagus consists of a single, slightly dorso-ventrally attened tube, apex narrowly
rounded and pointed, tip slightly reexed, base strongly tapered into a single, slender
apophysis which is slightly shorter than apical tube and forked apically (from inter-
net photo (Abb. 32) at http://www.coleo-net.de/coleo/texte/enicmus.htm, accessed 17
September 2014).
e shape of the pronotum distinguishes this species.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in neotropical and Australian regions (Johnson
2007, Rücker 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Sydney, NS in 1996 (CBU).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
90
First North American record. As above.
Habitat data. It is found in damp or mouldy straw, hay, and cut grass, and also associ-
ated with other vegetable refuse and on stored wheat (Hinton 1945). In NS, specimens
were collected in the nest of a barred owl, Strix varia Barton.
Comments. is species is known in North America only from two localities and three
specimens so it seems to be relatively rare.
81. Latridius hirtus Gyllenhal
(Figs. 81, 100a, b, Map 67)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.6-1.8 mm, dark brown to black, with mouthparts, antennae,
tibiae, tarsi and elytral margins slightly paler, reddish; antennal club 3-segmented, seg-
ments slightly elongate and somewhat rounded; pronotum widest apically, and converg-
ing gradually towards base, anterior angles produced and rounded, and with three large
impressions merging basally; elytra broadly oval, with long suberect to erect setae, elytral
strial punctures small and shallowly impressed; last male abdominal tergite slightly sinu-
ate; aedeagus consisting of a single robust tube, apex strongly pointed, slightly twisted,
and slightly attened, base strongly tapered into a single, slender apophysis which is
slightly shorter than apical tube, with a slender largely forked, ventral spicule (Figs. 100a,
b) and NB (15 km west of Tracy; RWC).
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is recorded for the rst time from AB (39 km west of Red Earth Creek; NOFC).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Creston, BC in 1948 (UBC); Black Sturgeon Lake, ON in
1956 (CNCI); Gatineau Park, QC in 1966 (CNCI); and ompson, MB in 1988
(NOFC).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In MB, specimens were reared from recently dead jack pine killed by
jack pine budworm, Choristoneura pinus Freeman. In AB, specimens were collected in
ight intercept traps attached to a dead Populus tremuloides Michx. In BC, specimens
were found on lumber and collected from Populus trichocarpa (UBC).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 91
82. Latridius minutus (Linnaeus)
(Fig. 82, Map 68)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.2-2.4 mm, brown, with antennae, mouthparts, legs, and
the margins of the pronotum and elytra paler, reddish; antennal club 3-segmented,
two basal segments subquadrate to transverse, apical segment laterally pointed; prono-
tum broadest apically with lateral margins converging posteriorly, front angles rounded
and slightly produced, basal part of disc with two lateral fovea joined by a transverse
impression; elytra broadly oval, intervals slightly carinate and sinuate posteriorly, two
rows of punctures present on both sides between interval 7 and the lateral margin
of elytra; metasternum with two pits posterior of mesocoxae, moderately pubescent,
with medium length setae (Rücker 2006, page 22, Fig. 8); last male abdominal tergite
broadly excavate (Rücker 2006, page 21, Fig. 5); aedeagus consisting of a single robust
tube, apex strongly pointed, slightly twisted, and slightly attened, base gradually ta-
pered into an elongate, bifurcate fork (Rücker 2006, page 21, Fig. 2).
e Palaearctic Latridius minutus, L. porcatus (Herbst) (= L. anthracinus Manner-
heim) and L. pseudominutus (Strand) can be identied by a combination of the aedea-
gus and the last abdominal tergite (see Rücker 2006).
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet et al.
2013). is species is newly recorded from ON (numerous localities; CNCI, DEBU).
Distribution in USA. AK, CA, CO, DC, ID, IL, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, NH,
NJ, NY, OR, PA, TX, WA, WI, WY (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Ferryland, NF from 1620-1696 (Bain and Prévost 2010);
Quebec City, QC 1675-1699, 1700-1725 (Bain et al. 2009, Bain and King 2011);
Hastings, ON in 1897 (CNCI); Merritt, BC in 1924 (UBC); Winnipeg, BC in 1916
(CNCI); and Saskatoon, SK in 1938 (UMAN).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species is the most common latridiid associated with stored food prod-
ucts including grains, and it is especially frequent in putrid, mouldy vegetables and decay-
ing hay and grass (Bousquet 1990a, Rücker 2004). It has been recorded on Canadian cargo
ships carrying wheat, our, and linseed meal (Aitken 1975). It is found in buildings, nests
of Hymenoptera and birds, manure heaps, decomposing fungi, wood stacks, and on various
mouldy objects, where it feeds on lamentous fungi (Hinton 1945, Lawrence and Newton
1980). In Atlantic Canada, the species has been reported from native habitats such as red
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
92
spruce and balsam r forests (Majka et al. 2009), and was found under the bark of a dead
sugar maple (Webster et al. 2012). In BC, it was reared from dead wood of subalpine r,
Engelmann spruce, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine, and western white pine (Hatch 1962).
Comments. Prévost and Bain (2007) found remains of L. minutus in a latrine exca-
vated in Ferryland, NF, originating from 1620-1696 which is the earliest record for
this species in North America. is species was distributed throughout Canada at least
a century ago.
83. Stephostethus lardarius (DeGeer)
(Figs. 83, 101a, b, Map 69)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-2.8 mm, usually uniformly reddish-brown; antennae with
an inconspicuous 3-segmented club, segments slightly narrowly elongate with apical
segment transversely enlarged; head width at eye level about equal to width of pronotum
at middle; pronotum with sides weakly concave near middle, width at the constriction
nearly equal to or greater than length of pronotum; elytra broadly oval, slightly produced
apically, shoulders slightly angular, strial punctures large, intervals slightly elevated; last
abdominal male tergite and sternite fused into a large bulbous structure containing the
genitalia; aedeagus consisting of a single tube, apex strongly attened, tip elongate and
broadly rounded, gradually expanding basally in lateral view (Figs. 101a, b).
Males of Stephostethus species dier from females in that they have an apical tooth
or spine present at apex of protibia (often meso- and metatibia as well), or if tibial
teeth are absent then the rst pro-tarsomere (often the rst meso- and meta-tarsomere
as well) is expanded. Females do not have any modication of the tibia and tarsomeres.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. NF (Bousquet et al. 2013).
Distribution in USA. Not known from USA.
First Canadian records. St. Johns, NF in 1949 (CNCI, MUN).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species was recorded from houses, beds, vegetable refuse, and moss
(Hinton 1945).
Comments. is species seems to be conned to St. John’s. It is still persisting there as
it was found on three occasions in 1997 (AASJ).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 93
84. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer
(Fig. 84)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-1.8 mm, dark reddish-brown, antennae, mouthparts
and legs paler yellowish-red; antennae short, about as long as length of head and
pronotum combined, with inconspicuous 3-segmented club, basal antennomere
elongate, apical antennomeres slightly transverse; head width at eyes broader than
width of pronotum at middle; pronotum with strong middle constriction, anterior
angles strongly produced horizontally; elytra oval, sixth interval carinate in basal
two-thirds and extending onto humeral angle, striae with medium sized punctures
that are shallowly impressed, medium-length pubescence sparsely distributed and
suberect to erect.
No male specimens were available to examine the genitalia.
Native range. Southwestern palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. Although this species was initially reported from NB by
Webster et al. (2012), that was an error.
Distribution in USA. NY? (Downie and Arnett 1996).
First Canadian records. Not present in Canada.
First North American records. North America (unspecied locality) before 1889
(Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. Unknown.
Comments. ere have been only one reported collection of this species in North
America. e record of S. productus from NY is questionable and cannot be conrmed,
and the record from NB represents misidentication of L. hirtus. Stephostethus produc-
tus is therefore removed from the NB and Canadian species list.
85. es bergrothi (Reitter)
(Figs. 85, 102a, b, Map 69)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-1.8 mm, reddish-brown; antennal club 3-segmented, seg-
ments slightly elongate; pronotum slightly broadening apically, subquadrate, front an-
gles slightly produced anteriad and pointed apically, basal part of disc impressed; elytra
broadly oval, with no distinct pubescence, costae between rows of punctures elevated,
four rows of punctures present on both sides between the seventh interval and the
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
94
lateral margin of elytra; aedeagus consists of a simple, single tube which is strongly
dorso-ventrally attened, apex varies from weakly-to-strongly aciculate and elongate
with a smaller attened and often-twisted, lightly sclerotized plate, basal spicule present
(sometimes fused to base of aedeagus) with both apex and base bifurcate (Figs. 102a, b).
A second species, es laeviventris (Fall 1899), is recognized in North America (Walk-
ley 1952). is rare species was originally described in the genus Enicmus, from a single
specimen collected from Astoria, Oregon. It diers from T. bergrothi in that it is entirely
rufo-testaceous, has an overall smaller body size (<1.5 mm), elytral intervals 3 and 5 are
not strongly elevated and only interval 7 is elevated and carinate along its entire length.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in Greenland and Africa (Böcher 1988, Johnson
2007, Rücker 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, MB, NB, NS, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is spe-
cies is recorded for the rst time from QC (four localities; CIQ).
Distribution in USA. Unknown.
First Canadian records. Montreal, QC in 1915 (CIQ); Winnipeg, MB in 1916
(CNCI); Saskatoon, SK in 1926 (CNCI); Vancouver, BC in 1948 (Hatch 1962); and
Sable Island, NS in 1967 (CNCI).
First North American records. See above.
Habitat data. is species is commonly associated with stored food products, damp
or mouldy houses, cellars, warehouses, kitchens, granaries, where it is found on
our, mouldy wallpapers, dried plants, leather, mouldy wine vats, cheese, and dried
cocoa (Hinton 1945, Böcher 1988, Bousquet 1990a). In NS, it was found in straw
(Majka et al. 2009).
Subfamily CORTICARIINAE
86. Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal)
(Fig. 86, Map 70)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.3-1.8 mm, dark brown to uniformly reddish-brown or red-
dish-yellow; head with large eyes that encompass most of the lateral side of the head,
temples very tiny and angulate; antennal club 3-segmented, antennomere II strongly
transverse; pronotum subquadrate to rectangular, margins serrate, posterior angles with
small spines; elytra with margins parallel for most of length, intervals with single row of
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 95
ne punctures, pubescence inconspicuous; aedeagus consisting of a single tube, overall
form spatulate, strongly dorso-ventrally attened, apex broadly rounded, with forked
ventral accessory spicule fused behind apical third (Majka et al. 2009, page 359, Fig. 43).
Males of Corticaria species dier from females by having a small apical tooth or
spine present at the apex of the pro-tibia (often meso- and meta-tibia as well), or if
tibial teeth are absent then the rst pro-tarsomere (often the rst meso- and meta-
tarsomere as well) is expanded and heart shaped. Females do not have any modication
of the tibia and tarsomeres.
Native range. Western palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. LB, NB, NF, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is recorded for the rst time from LB (Muskrat Falls; MUN), ON (ve locali-
ties; DEBU) and QC (numerous localities; CIUL, CIQ).
Distribution in USA. CA, FL, IA, ID, IN, MA, MI, NH, NJ, NY, OR, PA, WA
(Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Saguenay, QC in 1879 (CIUL); Ridgeway, ON before 1900
(DEBU); Marion Bridge, NS in 1966 (AASJ); and Mount Pearl, NF in 1980 (AASJ).
First North American records. See above; MA, MI and PA (unspecied localities)
before 1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. It is frequently found in stored food products in warehouses, grain
elevators, and food mills (Hatch 1961, Bousquet 1990a), and in decomposing hay
and grass, moss, vegetable detritus, dry fungus, birds' nests and on trees and branches
(Hinton 1945, Hicks 1959, Rücker 2007). In NB, it was found in skim milk powder
(Webster et al. 2012).
87. Corticaria impressa (Olivier)
(Fig. 87, Map 71)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.2-2.5 mm, dark brown to blackish, with mouthparts, anten-
nomeres I-IX, legs and tarsi paler, reddish-brown to yellowish-brown; antennal club
3-segmented, segments elongate, rst antennal segment distinctly longer than wide;
head strongly narrowed in front of eyes, eyes small, temples small but distinct; prono-
tum slightly elongate, arcuate laterally with margins crenulate, broadest at middle of
disc and narrowest at base; elytra oval with sides broadly arcuate, shoulders rounded,
intervals more nely punctate than striae, pubescence conspicuous and recumbent;
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
96
aedeagus consisting of a single tube, overall form narrow and pointed, dorso-ventrally
attened, apex pointed and narrowly rounded and slightly elongate, with forked ven-
tral accessory spicule fused behind apical third to half, internal sac with conspicuous
diamond shaped teeth (Majka et al. 2009, page 359, Fig. 45).
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. BC, NB, NS, ON, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is species
is recorded for the rst time from ON (Elora and Fathom Five National Park; DEBU)
and QC (Lévis; CIUL).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Lévis, QC from 1880-1889 (CIUL); Creston, BC in 1951
(Majka et al. 2009); South Harbour Beach, NS in 1983 (CNCI); and Kent Island, NB
in 1990 (Majka et al. 2009).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. In Europe, this species was found in swamps and moist forests (Peez
1967). In NS, adults were collected in a raised bog with pitfall traps, on the edge of a
marsh, in a young white pine forest and on coastal beaches (Majka et al. 2009).
Comments. e record in BC likely represents an independent introduction event.
88. Corticaria pubescens (Gyllenhal)
(Fig. 88, Map 72)
Diagnosis. Body length 2.3-3.0 mm, dark brown to dark reddish-brown, with an-
tennomeres I-VIII, tibia and tarsomeres often paler, reddish-brown; antennal club
3-segmented, segments distinctly elongate; head with eyes moderate in size; tem-
ples moderate in size, angulate; pronotum slightly elongate, broadest at middle of
disc, sides broadly arcuate and serrated; elytra narrowly oval, shoulders rounded,
pubescence conspicuous, setae of intervals longer and stouter than those of striae,
erect to suberect; mesocoxae separated by one-third to one-quarter of their diameter;
aedeagus consists of a single tube, overall form narrow and pointed, dorso-ventrally
attened, apex pointed and narrowly rounded and elongate, apical third strongly
reexed ventrally, with forked ventral accessory spicule fused behind apical third to
half, internal sac with conspicuous triangular shaped teeth in basal half (Majka et al.
2009, page 360, Fig. 46).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 97
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in sub-Saharan Africa and Australia (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NS, ON, QC, SK (Bousquet et al. 2013). is
species is recorded for the rst time in AB (Waterton Lakes National Park; CNCI), MB
(Aweme and Riding Mountain National Park; UMAN, CNC) and QC (Roberval and
Duchesnay; CIQ).
Distribution in USA. IA, ID, IL, MA, MI, NY, PA, WA (LeConte 1855, Majka et
al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Sudbury, ON in 1889 (CNCI); Aweme, MB in 1919
(UMAN); Creston, BC in 1931 (UBC); Roberval, QC in 1937 (CIQ); and Waterton
Lakes National Park, AB in 1980 (CNCI).
First North American records. Cambridge, MA before 1855 (LeConte 1855); MA
and MI (unspecied localities) before 1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. is species is frequently associated with stored food products such as
grains. It also occurs in haystacks, ood debris, decaying seaweed, moss, hay, straw, vege-
table detritus, old birds' nests, houses, and on tree bark (Hinton 1945, Bousquet 1990a).
89. Corticaria saginata Mannerheim
(Fig. 89, Map 73)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.5-1.8 mm, dark brown to entirely blackish, with anten-
nae, legs and tarsi often reddish-brown; head shape triangular, eyes moderate in size
and slightly protruding, temples small and angulate; antennal club 3-segmented
with basal two segments transverse; pronotum transverse, broadest at middle, ar-
cuate laterally and strongly converging near base of disc giving a heart shaped ap-
pearence, lateral margins coarsely serrate with large teeth and basal angles; elytra
elongate-oval, lateral margins arcuate and gradually converging posteriorly into
a round apex, punctures small and shallowly impressed, pubescence conspicuous
and recumbent; aedeagus consisting of a single tube, overall form robust, narrow
and blunt, apex blunt broadly rounded to slightly angulate, slightly elongate, apex
strongly curved ventrally, with forked ventral accessory spicule fused behind apical
third to half (Majka et al. 2009, page 360, Fig. 48).
e distinctive oval shape of the elytra, coarsely serrate lateral margins of the pro-
notum, and triangular head distinguish this species from congeners.
Native range. Palaearctic (Johnson 2007).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
98
Distribution in Canada. NB, NS, QC (Bousquet et al. 2013). is species is reported
for the rst time from QC (Quebec City; CIQ).
Distribution in USA. No known records.
First Canadian records. Annapolis Royal, NS in 1924 (CNCI); Taxis, NB in 1967
(CNC); and Quebec City, QC in 1983 (CIQ).
First North American records. As above.
Habitat data. is species is found in decomposing hay, sometimes on heaths under
heather, Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull (Ericaceae), and broom, Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link.
(Fabacaeae) (Peez 1967). In NB, it was found on bracket fungi (Majka et al. 2009).
90. Corticaria serrata (Paykull)
(Fig. 90, Map 74)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.7-2.3 mm, dark reddish-brown to dark brown, often antennae,
head, pronotum, legs and tarsi paler than elytra, reddish brown; head with large rounded
eyes, temples very tiny to obsolete and rounded; antennal club 3-segmented, basal two
segments subquadrate to slightly transverse; pronotum slightly transverse, broadest at
middle, arcuate laterally and slightly more converging basally than apically, lateral mar-
gins coarsely serrate (10-12 large teeth), anterior half of disc with punctures wider than
facets of eyes and seldom separated by as much as one diameter; elytra elongate, narrowly
oval, sides at middle slightly arcuate, nearly straight, apex rounded, punctures on intervals
near base of disc almost as coarse as strial punctures, punctures on median portion of disc
at least half the size of strial punctures; aedeagus consists of a single tube, overall form
robust, broad, apex broadly rounded and strongly curved ventrally, with forked ventral
accessory spicule fused behind apical third to half (Majka et al. 2009, page 360, Fig. 49).
e coarsely serrate pronotum and large rounded eyes distinguish this species from
congeners.
Native range. Palaearctic; now cosmopolitan (Johnson 2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet
et al. 2013). is species is reported for the rst time from AB (numerous locali-
ties; NOFC, UASM), MB (Winnipeg; UMAN), ON (four localities; DEBU) and NB
(near Tracy). Although previously recorded from BC, we were unable to locate a speci-
men or a published locality record.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 99
Distribution in USA. AZ, CA, FL, ID, IL, IN, MA, MI, NC, NE, NH, OR, RI, SC,
VA, WA, WY (Majka et al. 2009).
First Canadian records. Saguenay, QC in 1879 (CIUL); Winnipeg, MB in 1911
(UMAN); St. Johns, NF in 1975 (ACNL); Windsor, ON in 1976 (DEBU); and
Lunenburg, NS in 1977 (NSMC).
First North American records. NE before1825 (Say 1825); CA, MI, NB and Bualo,
NY before 1889 (Fauvel 1889).
Habitat data. is species is associated with stored food products, including grains,
and is also found on mouldy plant debris (Böcher 1988, Bousquet 1990a). In BC, it
has been reared from the dead wood of subalpine r, Engelman spruce, lodgepole pine
and ponderosa pine (Hatch 1962). In PE, it was found feeding on mould in a house.
In Maine, it was found in association with fungi (Procter 1946).
91. Cortinicara gibbosa (Herbst)
(Figs. 91, 103a, b, Map 75)
Diagnosis. Body length 1.1-1.7 mm, reddish-brown to dark brown, often antenno-
meres II-VII, legs and tarsi paler, yellowish-red; antennal club 3-segmented, segments
narrowly elongate; head with large round eyes, temples obsolete; pronotum narrowest
at apex and broadest at middle of disc, rounded apically and laterally, basally with
slight constriction; elytra broadly oval and rounded at apex, pubescence long, ne and
recumbent; rst visible abdominal sternum with coxal lines; second meta-tarsomere
shorter than rst; aedeagus consists of a single tube, overall form robust, broad, apex
broadly rounded, slightly elongate at tip and strongly curved ventrally, with forked,
keeled, ventral accessory spicule fused behind apical third to half (Figs. 103a, b).
Males of C. gibbosa dier from females in the presence of a large tooth on the in-
side of the protibia near the apex; females have simple protibia.
Native range. Palaearctic; adventive in sub-Saharan Africa and the Orient (Johnson
2007).
Distribution in Canada. AB, BC, LB, MB, NB, NF, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK (Bousquet
et al. 2013). is species is newly recorded from LB (Charlottetown; MUN).
Distribution in USA. CA, ID, IN, MA, ME, MI, NH, NY, OR, PA, RI, WA, WV
(Majka et al. 2009).
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea
100
First Canadian records. Brandon, MB in 1903 (CNCI); Lavaltrie, QC in 1922
(CIUL); Port Grey, BC in 1926 (UBC); Penobscquis, NB 1926 (CNCI); Annapolis
Royal, NS in 1928 (CNCI); Elkwater, AB in 1956 (CNCI); Arkell, ON in 1957
(DEBU); and Gander, NF in 1974 (ACNL).
First North American records. CA, NH, MA, MI, OR, WA, WV before 1899 (Fall 1899).
Habitat data. In Atlantic Canada, it is the most abundant latriidid species record-
ed from marshlands, pastures, coastal elds and barrens, seashores, sand dunes,
heaths, pine barrens, meadows, sphagnum bogs, stream edges, shores of ponds, wet
swales, grasslands, and in coastal mixed and coniferous forests (Majka et al. 2009).
Fifty-nine percent of individuals reported by Majka et al. (2009) were found in
open and damp habitats. In BC, it was collected from fungus, a bog, and owers
of hawthorn.
Acknowledgements
We thank P. Cheers (LFC) for editing the manuscript. e rst author thanks his
project leader A. Hopkin (Great Lakes Forestry Centre), his research director L. Caron
(LFC) and director general J. Leclerc (LFC) for supporting this work. We thank Udo
Schmidt for the photo of Aphidecta obliterata. We appreciate the help of M. Labrecque
(LFC) who checked the references throughout the text. is research was funded by
the Natural Resources Canada, Forest Invasive Alien Species (FIAS) project.
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Smith, L.B. 1962. A note on Cryptolestes turcicus (Grouvelle) (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) in a
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Walters, R. D., and V. D. Roth. 1950. Faunal nest study of the woodrat, Neotoma fuscipes mono-
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Watson, W.Y. 1979. North American distribution of Coccinella u. undecimpunctata L. (Coleop-
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Watters, F.L. 1955. Entomological aspects of bulk grain storage in the prairie provinces. Pro-
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Smetana, A. (eds): Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera. Vol. 4: Elateroidea, Derodontoidea,
Bostrichoidea, Lymexyloidea, Cleroidea, Cucujoidea. Apollo Books, Stenstrup, Denmark.
Westcott, R.L., LaBonte, J.R., Parsons, G.L., and Johnson, P.J. 2006. New records and other
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Wheeler, A.G., and Hoebeke, E.R. 1981. A revised distribution of Coccinella undecimpunctata
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Wheeler, A.G., and Hoebeke, E.R. 2009. Adventive (non-native) insects: importance to science
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Plates
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Figures 1-6. Body images in dorsal view: 1, Cryptophilus integer (Heer); 2. Rhizophagus parallelocollis
Gyllenhal; 3, Monotoma bicolor A. Villa & G.B. Villa; 4, Monotoma longicollis (Gyllenhal); 5, Monotoma
picipes Herbst; 6, Monotoma spinicollis Aubé. Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 111
Figures 7-12. Body images in dorsal view: 7, Monotoma quadrifoveolata Aubé; 8, Monotoma testacea Mots-
chulsky; 9, Cryptophagus cellaris (Scopoli); 10, Cryptophagus distinguendus Sturm; 11, Cryptophagus fallax
Balfour–Browne; 12, Cryptophagus laticollis Lucas. Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 13-18. Body images in dorsal view: 13, Cryptophagus obsoletus Reitter; 14, Cryptophagus pilo-
sus Gyllenhal; 15, Cryptophagus saginatus Sturm; 16, Cryptophagus scanicus (Linnaeus); 17, Cryptophagus
scutellatus Newman; 18. Cryptophagus subfumatus Kraatz. Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 113
Figures 19-24. Body images in dorsal view: 19, Henoticus serratus (Gyllenhal); 20. Pteryngium crenatum
(Gyllenhal); 21, Telmatophilus typhae (Fallén); 22, Atomaria apicalis Erichson; 23, Atomaria fuscata Schön-
herr; 24, Atomaria lederi Johnson. Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 25-30. Body images in dorsal view: 25, Atomaria lewisi Reitter; 26, Atomaria pusilla (Paykull); 27.
Atomaria testacea Stephens; 28. Atomaria atrata Reitter; 29. Ephistemus globulus (Paykull); 30, Ahasverus
advena (Waltl). Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 31-36. Body images in dorsal view: 31, Nausibius clavicornis (Kugelann); 32, Oryzaephilus merca-
tor (Fauvel); 33, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Linnaeus); 34, Silvanoprus angusticollis (Reitter); 35, Silvanus
bidentatus (Fabricius); 36, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens). Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 37-42. Body images in dorsal view: 37, Cryptolestes pusillus (Schönherr); 38, Cryptolestes turcicus
(Grouvelle); 39, Brachypterolus pulicarius (Linnaeus); 40, Brachypterus urticae (Fabricius); 41, Carpophilus
hemipterus (Linnaeus); 42, Carpophilus dimidiatus (Fabricius). Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 117
Figures 43-48. Body images in dorsal view: 43, Carpophilus mutilatus Erichson; 44, Carpophilus marginel-
lus Motschulsky; 45, Acanthogethes fuscus (Olivier); 46, Brassicogethes viridescens (Fabricius); 47, Genistho-
gethes carinulatus (Förster); 48, Meligethes atratus (Olivier). Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 49-54. Body images in dorsal view: 49, Aethina tumida Murray; 50, Nitidula carnaria (Schaller);
51, Nitidula rupes (Linnaeus); 52, Omosita colon (Linnaeus); 53, Omosita discoidea (Fabricius); 54, Soro-
nia grisea (Linnaeus). Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 119
Figures 55-61. Body images in dorsal view: 55, Murmidius ovalis (Beck); 56, Symbiotes gibberosus (Lucas);
57, Mycetaea subterranea (Fabricius); 58, Rhyzobius lophanthae (Blaisdell); 59, Adalia bipunctata (Lin-
naeus); 60, Aphidecta obliterata (Linnaeus); 61, Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus. Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 62-67. Body images in dorsal view: 62, Coccinella undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Linnaeus;
63, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas); 64, Hippodamia variegata (Goeze); 65, Propylaea quatuordecimpunctata
(Linnaeus); 66, Scymnus impexus Mulsant; 67, Scymnus suturalis unberg. Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 121
Figures 68-73. Body images in dorsal view: 68, Stethorus punctillum Weise; 69, Orthoperus atomus (Gyl-
lenhal); 70, Sericoderus lateralis (Gyllenhal); 71, Adistemia watsoni (Wollaston); 72, Cartodere bifasciata
(Reitter); 73, Cartodere constricta (Gyllenhal). Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 74-79. Body images in dorsal view: 74, Cartodere nodifer (Westwood); 75, Dienerella arga (Reit-
ter); 76, Dienerella costulata (Reitter); 77, Dienerella liformis (Gyllenhal); 78, Dienerella lum (Aubé); 79,
Dienerella rucollis (Marsham, 1802). Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 123
Figures 80-85. Body images in dorsal view: 80, Enicmus histrio Joy & Tomlin; 81, Latridius hirtus Gyl-
lenhal; 82, Latridius minutus (Linnaeus); 83, Stephostethus lardarius (DeGeer); 84, Stephostethus productus
Rosenhauer; 85, es bergrothi (Reitter). Scale bar = 1 mm.
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Figures 86-91. Body images in dorsal view: 86, Corticaria elongata (Gyllenhal); 87, Corticaria impressa
(Oliver); 88, Corticaria pubescens (Gyllenhal); 89, Corticaria saginata Mannerheim; 90, Corticaria serrata
(Paykull); 91, Cortinicara gibbosa (Herbst). Scale bar = 1 mm.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 125
Figures 92-97. Aedeagus in ventral (a) and lateral (b) views: 92, Adistemia watsoni (Wollaston), Lac des
Etangs, Quebec; 93, Cartodere consricta (Gyllenhal), Fort McMurray, Alberta; 94, Cartodere nodifer (West-
wood), Summerland, British Columbia; 95, Dienerella argus (Reitter), Ottawa, Ontario, Pilot Mound,
Manitoba; 96, Dienerella costulata (Reitter), Winnipeg, Manitoba, College Park, Maryland; 97, Dienerella
liformis (Gyllenhal), Oak Lake, Manitoba.
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Figures 98-102. Aedeagus in ventral (a) and lateral (b) views: 98, Dienerella lum (Aube), Quebec City,
Quebec; 99, Dienerella rucollis (Marsham), Salmon Arm, British Columbia, Sable Island, Nova Scotia;
100, Latridius hirtus Gyllenhal, Red Earth Creek, Alberta; 101, Stephostethus lardarius (De Geer), Mon-
treal, Quebec; 102, es bergrothi (Reitter), Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 127
Figures 103-106. Aedeagus in ventral (a) and lateral (b) views: 103, Cortinicara gibbosa (Herbst), Gros
Morne National Park and Carbonear, Newfoundland; 104, Henoticus serratus (Gyllenhal), Mount Lyall,
Quebec, Point Wolfe River Trail, New Brunswick; 105, Pteryngium crenatum (Gyllenhal), Vancouver and
Lorna, British Columbia; 106, Ephistemus globulus (Paykull), Royal Oak, British Columbia.
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Maps
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Index of taxonomic names listed in the text
Abies balsamea 22, 42
Acanthogethes fuscus 12, 17, 60, 117
Atomaria curtula 42
Adalia 11
Adalia bipunctata 18, 70, 119
Adelges piceae 77
Adelges tsugae 72
Adistemia 11
Adistemia watsoni 18, 81, 121, 125
Aethina 11
Aethina tumida 14, 17, 62, 118
Ahasverus 11
Ahasverus advena 17, 47, 114
ANAMORPHINAE 18, 68
Aphidecta 11
Aphidecta obliterata 12, 18, 71, 119
Arthrolips decolor 80
Aspergillus 48
Atomaria 11
Atomaria apicalis 16, 39, 44, 113
Atomaria atrata 17, 45, 114
Atomaria fuscata 17, 40, 113
Atomaria lederi 17, 41, 113
Atomaria lewisi 17, 42, 114
Atomaria pusilla 17, 43, 114
Atomaria rucornis 44
Atomaria testacea 17, 114
ATOMARIINAE 16, 26, 27
Betula pendula 67
BIPHYLLIDAE 15
BOTHERIDERIDAE 15
Brachypterolus 11
Brachypterolus pulicarius 17, 55, 116
Brachypterus 11
Brachypterus urticae 17, 55, 116
Brassicogethes 11
Brassicogethes viridescens 17, 60, 117
BYTURIDAE 15
Calluna vulgaris 98
CARABIDAE 7, 12-14
CARPOPHILINAE 17, 57
Carpophilus 11
Carpophilus dimidiatus 17, 57, 116
Carpophilus hemipterus 17, 57, 116
Carpophilus marginellus 17, 59, 117
Carpophilus mutilatus 17, 58, 117
Cartodere 11, 84
Cartodere bifasciata 14, 18, 82, 121
Cartodere constricta 18, 82, 83, 121
Cartodere nodifer 18, 84, 122, 125
CERYLONIDAE 11, 15, 18, 67
Coccinella 7, 11
Coccinella septempunctata 7, 13, 18, 72, 119
Coccinella undecimpunctata undecimpunctata
18, 73, 120
COCCINELLIDAE 7, 11, 12, 14, 15, 18, 69
COCCINELLINAE 18, 70
Corticaria 11, 95
Corticaria elongata 19, 94, 124
Corticaria impressa 19, 95, 124
Corticaria pubescens 19, 96, 124
Corticaria saginata 19, 97, 124
Corticaria serrata 19, 41, 98, 124
CORTICARIINAE 19, 81 94
Cortinicara 11
Cortinicara gibbosa 19, 99, 124, 127
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CORYLOPHIDAE 11, 15, 18, 79
CORYLOPHINAE 18
Crataegus 43
Cryptolestes 11
Cryptolestes ferrugineus 17, 52, 115
Cryptolestes pusillus 17, 53, 116
Cryptolestes turcicus 17, 53, 54, 116
CRYPTOPHAGIDAE 7, 11, 12, 14-16, 26
CRYPTOPHAGINAE 16, 26, 27
Cryptophagus 11
Cryptophagus cellaris 16, 27, 37, 111
Cryptophagus distinguendus 16, 28, 111
Cryptophagus fallax 16, 29, 111
Cryptophagus laticollis 16, 30, 111
Cryptophagus obsoletus 16, 31, 32, 112
Cryptophagus pilosus 16, 31, 112
Cryptophagus saginatus 16, 32, 33, 112
Cryptophagus scanicus 16, 33, 112
Cryptophagus scutellatus 16, 34, 112
Cryptophagus subfumatus 16, 33, 35-36, 112
CRYPTOPHILINAE 16, 20
Cryptophilus 11
Cryptophilus integer 16, 20, 110
CUCUJIDAE 12, 15
CUCUJOIDEA 1, 3, 4, 7-9, 11-15
Cytisus scoparius 98
DERMESTIDAE 12
Dienerella 11
Dienerella argus 18, 85, 125
Dienerella costulata 19, 85, 86, 122, 125
Dienerella liformis 19, 86, 122, 125
Dienerella lum 19, 87, 122, 126
Dienerella rucollis 19, 88, 89, 122, 126
Diuraphis noxia 75
Elatobium abietinus 72
ENDOMYCHIDAE 11, 13, 15 18, 68
Enicmus 11
Enicmus histrio 19, 89, 123
Ephistemus 11
Ephistemus globulus 17, 46, 114, 127
EROTYLIDAE 7, 11, 15, 16, 20
Fragaria 55
Genisthogethes 11
Genisthogethes carinulatus 17, 61, 117
Harmonia 11
Harmonia axyridis 7, 13, 18, 74, 120
Henoticus 11, 37
Henoticus serratus 16, 36, 113, 127
Hippodamia 11
Hippodamia variegata 18, 75, 120
Hudsonia ericoides 60
KATERETIDAE 7, 11, 15, 17, 54
LAEMOPHLOEIDAE 7, 11, 15, 17, 52
Laemophloeus puberulus 53
Laemophloeus truncatus 54
LATRIDIIDAE 7, 11-15, 18, 81
LATRIDIINAE 9, 18, 81
Latridius 11
Latridius anthracinus 91
Latridius hirtus 19, 90, 93, 123, 126
Latridius minutus 13, 19, 91, 92, 123
Latridius porcatus 91
Linaria 55
Meligethes 11
Meligethes atratus 17, 62, 117
MELIGETHINAE 7, 17
Monotoma 11
Monotoma bicolor 16, 22, 110
Monotoma longicollis 16, 23, 110
Monotoma parallelum 23
Monotoma picipes 16, 24, 110
Monotoma quadrifoveolata 16, 25, 111
Monotoma spinicollis 16, 24, 110
Monotoma testacea 16, 17, 26, 44, 111, 114
MONOTOMIDAE 11, 15, 16, 21
MONOTOMINAE 16, 22
MURMIDIINAE 18, 67
Murmidius 11
Murmidius ovalis 18, 67, 119
Mycetaea 11
Mycetaea subterranea 13, 18, 69, 119
MYCETINAE 18, 69
Nausibius 11
Nausibius clavicornis 14, 17, 48, 115
Nitidula 11
Nitidula carnaria 17, 63, 118
Nitidula rupes 13, 17, 64, 118
NITIDULIDAE 7, 8, 11-15, 17, 56
Synopsis of adventive species of Coleoptera (Insecta) recorded from Canada. Part 3: Cucujoidea 171
Odocoileus virginianus 66
Omosita 11
Omosita colon 18, 64, 118
Omosita discoidea 13, 18, 65, 118
Orthoperus 11
Orthoperus atomus 18, 79, 121
Oryzaephilus 11
Oryzaephilus mercator 17, 49, 115
Oryzaephilus surinamensis 13, 17, 49, 115
PASSANDRIDAE 15, 107
Passerculus sandwichensis princeps 30
Penicillium glaucoma 48
PHALACRIDAE 12, 15
Picea glauca 22
Picea rubens 37, 51
Pinus banksiana 78
Pinus silvestris 78
Pinus strobus 51
Propylaea 11, 18, 76, 120
Propylaea quatuordecimpunctata 18, 76, 120
Pteryngium 11, 16, 37, 113, 127
Pteryngium crenatum 16, 37, 113, 127
Quercus rubra 37
Raphanus raphanistrum 61
RHIZOPHAGINAE 16
Rhizophagus 11, 16, 21, 110
Rhizophagus parallelocollis 16, 21, 110
Rhyzobius 11, 18, 70, 119
Rhyzobius lophanthae 18, 70, 119
SCYMNINAE 76
Scymnus 11
Scymnus impexus 18, 76, 120
Scymnus pumilio 13
Scymnus suturalis 18, 77, 106, 120
Sericoderus 11
Sericoderus lateralis 18, 80, 121
SILVANIDAE 7, 11-15, 17, 47
SILVANINAE 17, 47
Silvanoprus 11
Silvanoprus angusticollis 17, 50, 115
Silvanus 11
Silvanus bidentatus 17, 51, 115
Soronia 11
Soronia grisea 18, 66, 106, 118
SPHINDIDAE 15, 108
Spiraea alba 42
STAPHYLINIDAE 7, 12, 13, 14, 105
Stephostethus 11
Stephostethus lardarius 19, 92, 123, 126
Stephostethus productus 12, 19, 93, 123
Stethorus punctillum 18, 78, 121
Strix varia 90
Sus scrofa 64
Symbiotes 11
Symbiotes gibberosus 18, 68, 119
SYMNINAE 18
Telmatophilus 11
Telmatophilus americanus 38
Telmatophilus angustifolia 39
Telmatophilus typhae 16, 38, 113
TENEBRIONIDAE 12
es 11
es bergrothi 19, 93, 94, 123, 126
Tsuga canadensis 42
Typha latifolia 39
Urtica dioica 56
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