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Factors that influence HIV testing among Non-Marginalized African American Women

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Abstract: This study assesses socio-behavioral influence on HIV testing among non-marginalized African American women (N =432 African-American women). Participants were drawn from a major Midwestern university. Over half tested for HIV at least once (63.6%). HIV tested women were more likely to report a prior STD (45%), sexual relations with someone previously jailed (30%), more sexual partners (6.8%) and endorse anti-HIV conspiracy beliefs (p<.05). Those not tested expressed stronger commitments to condom use and barriers to getting tested. Each additional sex partner was significantly associated with greater odds of getting tested (p<. 05). However, risk perception (p<.10), perceived barriers (p<.05) and positive attitudes towards condoms (p<.05) was significantly associated with decreased odds of getting tested.
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... Publications on the subject often emphasize that health care entities need to address the distrust of African Americans [36,46,[99][100][101][102][103][104][105][106] dispel conspiracies [28,30,107] be sensitive to those believers [108] and remember the stigma attached to the disease [109,110]. This author agrees and suggests that the change in messaging should begin with future researchers sparingly using the stigmatized/stereotyped wordconspiracy, in HIV/AIDS research of communities-ofcolor. ...
... Publications on the subject often emphasize that health care entities need to address the distrust of African Americans [36,46,[99][100][101][102][103][104][105][106] dispel conspiracies [28,30,107] be sensitive to those believers [108] and remember the stigma attached to the disease [109,110]. This author agrees and suggests that the change in messaging should begin with future researchers sparingly using the stigmatized/stereotyped wordconspiracy, in HIV/AIDS research of communities-ofcolor. ...
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