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The Modeling and Assessment of Work Performance

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Individual work role performance drives the entire economy. It is organizational psychology and organizational behavior's (OP/OB's) most crucial dependent variable. In this review, alternative specifications for the definition and latent structure of individual performance are reviewed and summarized. Setting aside differences in terminology, the alternatives are remarkably similar. The Campbell (2012) model is offered as a synthesized description of the content of the latent structure. Issues pertaining to performance dynamics are then reviewed, along with the role played by individual adaptability to changing performance requirements. Using the synthesized model of the latent content structure and dynamics of performance as a backdrop, issues pertaining to the assessment of performance are summarized. The alternative goals of performance assessment, general measurement issues, and the construct validity of specific methods (e.g., ratings, simulations) are reviewed and described. Cross-cultural issues and future research needs are noted.
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Campbell, J. P., & Wiernik, B. M. (2015). The modeling and assessment of
work performance. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and
Organizational Behavior, 2, 4774. http://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-
orgpsych-032414-111427
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... A function central to management is motivating employees and directing their behaviours towards achieving collective goals (Aguinis, 2019). Within-group cohesion based on collective goals is, in turn, paramount to maintain organisational effectiveness in a competitive business landscape (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Hogan & Sherman, 2020). A key feature of the managerial function is the continuous review of, and feedback on, performance, to reinforce enterprising behaviour and to calibrate actions against larger goals. ...
... 3. Adaptive performance relates to: 'employees' demonstration of the ability to cope with and effectively respond to crises or uncertainty' (Carpini et al., 2017;Pulakos et al., 2000). 4. Leadership performance refers to: 'the effectiveness with which an employee can influence co-workers to achieve collective goals' (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Hogan & Sherman, 2020;Yukl, 2012). 5. Counterproductive performance reflects on the: 'intentional or unintentional acts (Spector & Fox, 2005) by an employee that negatively affect the effectiveness with which an organisation achieves its goals and cause harm to its stakeholders' (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Marcus et al., 2016). ...
... 3. Adaptive performance relates to: 'employees' demonstration of the ability to cope with and effectively respond to crises or uncertainty' (Carpini et al., 2017;Pulakos et al., 2000). 4. Leadership performance refers to: 'the effectiveness with which an employee can influence co-workers to achieve collective goals' (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Hogan & Sherman, 2020;Yukl, 2012). 5. Counterproductive performance reflects on the: 'intentional or unintentional acts (Spector & Fox, 2005) by an employee that negatively affect the effectiveness with which an organisation achieves its goals and cause harm to its stakeholders' (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Marcus et al., 2016). ...
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... It uses any sources possible and gives the best effort to achieve those goals. Among so many factors, individual work performance is the basic foundation that can predict organizational achievement (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015). Even so, the concept of performance is often misunderstood or used interchangeably with the term productivity. ...
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... Considering its paramount importance, public organizations must pay attention to work performance relative to the formulation of policies and improvement of the delivery of services. Furthermore, Campbell and Wiernik (2014) describe the phrase "work performance" as "an individuallevel variable, or something that a single person performs." ...
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