Pedicularis wanghongiae (Orobanchaceae), a new species from Yunnan, southwestern China

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DOI: 10.11646/phytotaxa.217.1.4
Abstract
Pedicularis wanghongiae M.L.Liu & W.B.Yu, a new species from Gaoligong Mountains in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, is described and illustrated. This new species was found growing in the wet meadow at the top of the mountains near Dulongjiang Township and Cikai Township. Pedicularis wanghongiae is morphologically similar to P. praeruptorum Bonati, but differs from the latter in having an upward bent galea, shorter petioles and only two pubescent filaments. In addition, stems of P. wanghongiae are densely glandular pubescent, and its leaves are abaxially white pubescent along the veins. Furthermore, the pollen grain of P. wanghongiae is bisyncolpate with microfoveolate exine ornamentation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using four DNA loci (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnL-F) support the delimitation of this new species. Morphologically, this new species should be placed in Pedicularis series Paucifoliatae Prain according to Tsoong’s classification. However, series Paucifoliatae was shown to be paraphyletic based on molecular data. A key to species in series Paucifoliatae is presented, and relationships among these species discussed.
Phytotaxa 217 (1): 053–062
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Copyright © 2015 Magnolia Press Article PHYTOTAXA
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Accepted by Peter Heenan: 15 Apr. 2015; published: 22 Jun. 2015
http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/phytotaxa.217.1.4
53
Pedicularis wanghongiae (Orobanchaceae), a new species from Yunnan, southwestern
China
MIN-LU LIU1, 3 & WEN-BIN YU2*
1 Key Laboratory of Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Kunming 650201, China
2 Center for Integrative Conservation, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Mengla 666303, China
3 Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*Author for correspondence. E-mail: yuwenbin@xtbg.ac.cn
Abstract
Pedicularis wanghongiae M.L.Liu & W.B.Yu, a new species from Gaoligong Mountains in Yunnan Province, southwestern
China, is described and illustrated. This new species was found growing in the wet meadow at the top of the mountains
near Dulongjiang Township and Cikai Township. Pedicularis wanghongiae is morphologically similar to P. praeruptorum
Bonati, but differs from the latter in having an upward bent galea, shorter petioles and only two pubescent filaments. In
addition, stems of P. wanghongiae are densely glandular pubescent, and its leaves are abaxially white pubescent along the
veins. Furthermore, the pollen grain of P. wanghongiae is bisyncolpate with microfoveolate exine ornamentation. Molecular
phylogenetic analyses using four DNA loci (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnL-F) support the delimitation of this new species. Mor-
phologically, this new species should be placed in Pedicularis series Paucifoliatae Prain according to Tsoong’s classification.
However, series Paucifoliatae was shown to be paraphyletic based on molecular data. A key to species in series Paucifolia-
tae is presented, and relationships among these species discussed.
Key words: Gaoligong Mountains, Pedicularis, Morphology, Taxonomy
Introduction
The hemiparasitic genus Pedicularis Linnaeus (1753: 607), consisting of around 600–800 species throughout the
world, mainly distributed in arctic-alpine regions in the northern hemisphere (Li 1951; Yang et al. 1998; Mill 2001;
Wu et al. 2003; Wang & Li 2005). Two-thirds of the more than 350 species of Pedicularis in China are confined to the
Himalayan-Hengduan Mountains region, a center for species diversity and endemism of this genus (Hong 1983; Yang
et al. 1998; Wang et al. 2009; Yu et al. 2008, 2010).
Mainly focusing on Chinese species, Li (1948, 1949) and Tsoong (1963) proposed different classification systems
of Pedicularis. In Li’s system, 282 species were classed into 65 series, 18 sections and three greges (groups), whereas
in Tsoong’s system, 329 species were classed into 112 series and 13 greges (groups).
Series Paucifoliatae Prain (1890: 80) is characterized by having rigid stems, few cauline leaves, and the corolla
with a long and slender beak (Yang et al. 1998). The delimitation of this series is inconsistent between Li’s and
Tsoong’s systems (Table 1). Li (1949) placed five species in this series, while Tsoong (1963) added three species
from series Asplenifoliae Prain (1890: 79), reduced P. aphyllocaulis Handel-Mazzetti (1925: 239) as a synonym of P.
praeruptorum Bonati (1921: 126), and transferred P. tsangchanensis Franchet ex Maximowicz (1888: 571) to series
Filiculae Li (1949: 9). In addition, Li (1949) established series Asplenifoliae based on the absence of cauline leaves
and less leaf segments, which is very close to series Paucifoliatae. Li’s series Asplenifoliae includes nine species,
while Tsoong (1963) retained P. mayana Handel-Mazzetti (1936: 858) and P. yui Li (1949: 102), and a newly described
species P. tenacifolia Tsoong (1963: 416) was placed in this series (Table 1).
During a field expedition in Gaoligong Mountains (southwestern China) in 2007, Lian-Ming Gao and Zhi-Rong
Zhang, from Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, collected an undescribed species (Figs.
1, 2A). Recently, we conducted extensive field investigations on Pedicularis in the Gaoligong Mountains. Through
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54 Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press
careful field observation, we hypothesized that this previously undiscovered species should be categorized into series
Paucifoliatae, morphologically similar to P. praeruptorum Bonati. Based on morphological and molecular data, this
plant material was identified as a new species that we named P. wanghongiae M.L.Liu & W.B.Yu. Herein, this new
species is described and illustrated.
TABLE 1. Comparison of classification treatment of Pedicularis series Paucifoliatae and Asplenifoliae between systems of Li (1949) and
Tsoong (1963)
Li’s classification system Tsoong’s classification system
Series Paucifoliatae Prain Series Paucifoliatae Prain
*P. aphyllocaulis Hand.-Mazz. P. forrestiana Bonati
P. forrestiana Bonati P. micrantha H. L. Li
P. micrantha H. L. Li *P. praeruptorum Bonati
(including *P. aphyllocaulis Hand.-Mazz.)
*P. tsangchanensis Franch. ex Maxim. *P. tsarungensis H. L. Li
P. yunnanensis Franch. ex Maxim. *P. umbelliformis H. L. Li
P. yunnanensis Franch. ex Maxim.
Series Asplenifoliae Prain Series Asplenifoliae Prain
P. mayana Hand.-Mazz. P. mayana Hand.-Mazz.
*P. mychophila Marq. & Shaw *P. tenacifolia P. C. Tsoong
*P. potaninii Maxim. P. yui H. L. Li
*P. praeruptorum Bonati Series Mychophilae P. C. Tsoong
*P. tsarungensis H. L. Li P. mychophila Marq. & Shaw
*P. umbelliformis H. L. Li Series Filiculae H. L. Li
P. yui H. L. Li *P. potaninii Maxim.
*P. tsangchanensis Franch. ex Maxim.
* Species that have been placed in different series in systems of Li (1949) and Tsoong (1963)
Material and methods
Field collection and morphological study
The new species we identify here, Pedicularis wanghongiae, was collected from the mountains near the Dulongjiang
Township and Cikai Township, Gongshan county. To examine this new species and the relationship with its closely
related species, 24 species of Pedicularis, including P. wanghongiae, were studied using both morphological and
molecular methods. Voucher specimens were deposited at the herbarium of Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese
Academy of Sciences (KUN; Appendix S1).
The new species was observed in the field and lab under an anatomical lens (OLMPUS-SZX12). Pollen was
dehydrated using an ethanol series (Yu & Wang 2008) and then examined with SEM (Hitachi S-4800). Additionally,
indumentum of stems and leaves in P. wanghongiae (L.Lu et al. LL-2014-16, KUN), P. praeruptorum (L.M.Gao et al.
GLM-123909, H.Li et al. 26363, and L.Lu et al. LL201420, KUN) and P. yunnanensis Franchet ex Maximowicz (1888:
572) (W.B.Yu et al. 2014087, KUN) were observed under SEM.
Molecular phylogenetic analyses
For molecular phylogenetic studies, DNA sequences of 22 species of Pedicularis were obtained from previously
A NEW SPECIES OF PEDICULARIS FROM YUNNAN Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press 55
published studies (Yu et al. 2011, 2013) or generated in this study following Yu et al. (2011). Both alternate-
leaved species and opposite/whorled-leaved species from series Asplenifoliae, including three species from series
Asplenifoliae, were selected as outgroup for the phylogenetic analysis of species from series Paucifoliatae. Sequences
were assembled and edited using Sequencher 4.1.4, then aligned using MAFFT version 7.0 (Katoh & Standley 2013).
Four DNA loci (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnL-F) were used for Bayesian inference (BI), maximum likelihood (ML) and
maximum parsimony (MP) phylogeny reconstruction. The BI analysis was performed using MrBayes version 3.1
(Ronquist & Huelsenbeck 2003). The total dataset is portioned as ITS and the concatenated plastid. DNA substitution
model for ITS and the concatenated plastid datasets, respectively, using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) was
estimated using jModeltest version 2 (Darriba et al. 2012). The ML analysis was conducted with RAxML (Stamatakis
et al. 2008) on the CIPRES Science Gateway (http://www.phylo.org). The MP analysis was carried out using PAUP*
version 4.0b10 (Swofford 2003). Parameter setting for the three analyses followed Yu et al. (2013).
FIGURE 1. Pedicularis wanghongiae M.L.Liu & W.B.Yu. A. Habit. B. Corolla lower lip. C. Flower. D. Open beak showing anther and
filaments. E. Open Calyx. F. Leaf. G. Capsule. Drawn by Min-Lu Liu from the holotype, Z.K.Wu et al. HW2014118 (KUN).
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56 Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press
Results
Morphological comparisons
Roots of P. praeruptorum, P. wanghongiae and P. yunnanensis are fusiform, while roots of the other species in series
Paucifoliatae are filiform. The stems of all species in series Paucifoliatae are pubescent (Figs. 3A, D, E), however,
the stems of P. yunnanensis are glabrous except for lines of hairs (Fig. 3J). Pedicularis praeruptorum, P. tsarungensis
Li (1949: 100), P. umbelliformis Li (1949: 100), P. wanghongiae and P. yunnanensis have pinnatipartite to pinnatisect
leaves that are mainly basal, while P. forrestiana Bonati (1911: 86) and P. micrantha Li (1949: 106) are characterized by
pinnatifid to pinnatipartite leaves that are both basal and on the stem, and the basal leaves are much larger. The petiole
is almost as long as the leaf blade in P. forrestiana, P. micrantha and P. wanghongiae (Fig. 1F), but is longer than the
leaf blade in other species in series Paucifoliatae. Leaves of P. wanghongiae are abaxially pubescent along the veins
(Fig. 3C) and adaxially glabrous (Fig. 3B). Leaves of P. praeruptorum are abaxially pubescent along veins or almost
glabrous (Figs. 3G–I) and adaxially glabrous (Fig. 3F). Leaves of P. yunnanensis are abaxially sparsely pubescent
along veins (Fig. 3L) and adaxially glabrous (Fig. 3K). The calyx is 1/3–1/2 cleft anteriorly in P. praeruptorum and P.
yunnanensis, but is 1/2–2/3 cleft anteriorly in P. wanghongiae (Fig. 1E). Filaments are all pubescent in P. praeruptorum
and P. yunnanensis, and are all glabrous in P. tsarungensis, while two filaments are pubescent and two are glabrous in
P. umbelliformis and P. wanghongiae (Fig. 1D).
FIGURE 2. Habit and pollen morphology of Pedicularis wanghongiae. A. Habit. B. Equatorial view of pollen. C. Polar view of pollen.
D. Microfoveolate exine ornamentation. Pollen samples are collected from the holotype.
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FIGURE 3. Indumentum of Pedicularis wanghongiae, P. praeruptorum and P. yunnanensis. A. Stem surface of P. wanghongiae. B.
Adaxial leaf surface of P. wanghongiae. C, Abaxial leaf surface of P. wanghongiae. D, E. Stem surface of P. praeruptorum. F. Adaxial leaf
surface of P. praeruptorum. G, H, I. Abaxial leaf surface of P. praeruptorum. J. Stem surface of P. yunnanensis. K. Adaxial leaf surface of
P. yunnanensis. L. Abaxial leaf surface of P. yunnanensis. A–C from L.Lu et al. LL-2014-16; D, F, I from L.Lu et al. LL201420; E, G from
L.M.Gao et al. GLM-123909; H from H.Li et al. 26363; and J–K from W.B.Yu et al. 2014087.
Pollen morphology of P. wanghongiae
Pollen grains are radially symmetrical, isopolar, prolate spheroidal, and small in size (polar length: 17.29 ± 0.93 µm ×
equatorial diameter: 15.80 ± 0.50 µm). Pollen apertures are bisyncolpate (Figs. 2B, C), and the colpi are usually wide
and sunken, with the colpus membrane covered by granular elements (Fig. 2B); exine ornamentation is microfoveolate,
with an undulating surface (Fig. 2D).
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58 Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press
FIGURE 4. Strict consensus tree based on maximum parsimony analysis (MP) using ITS, matK, rbcL and trnL-F sequences. Posterior
probability value of Bayesian inference and bootstrap values (≥50) of maximum parsimony/likelihood are indicated above branches.
A NEW SPECIES OF PEDICULARIS FROM YUNNAN Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press 59
Phylogenetic analyses
For the 32 accessions included in phylogenetic analyses, length of the combined alignment is 3035bp, with 290
parsimony-informative sites and 715 variable sites. Branch length of the MP trees is 1075. Consistency, retention and
rescaled consistency indices are 0.741, 0.787 and 0.584, respectively. The substitution model selected by BIC for the
BI analysis is GTR+I+G for the ITS dataset (-lnL=3189.54, K=72, BIC=6843.63) and TPM1uf+G for the concatenated
plastid dataset (-lnL=7217.29, K=68, BIC=14963.86). Phylogenetic analyses show Tsoong’s series Paucifoliatae is not
monophyletic (Fig. 4), including alternate-leaved species from other series. The new species P. wanghongiae, together
with P. praeruptorum, P. micrantha, P. yunnanensis and other alternate-leaved species, form a well-supported clade
(BIPP/MPBP/MLBP = 1.00/74%/94%). Recognition of P. wanghongiae as a new species is strongly supported (BIPP/
MPBP/MLBP = 1.00/99%/100%). Pedicularis wanghongiae is closely related to P. praeruptorum and P. micrantha
(BIPP/MPBP/MLBP = 1.00/82%/95%). Pedicularis umbelliformis, P. yui and P. tenacifolia form a well-supported
clade (BIPP/MPBP/MLBP = 1.00/99%/100%), and P. yunnanensis is closely related to P. strobilacea Franchet ex
Forbes & Hemsley (1890: 216) (BIPP/MPBP/MLBP = 1.00/74%/73%).
Discussion
The new species P. wanghongiae should be placed in Tsoong’s series Paucifoliatae Prain for its absence of persistent
leaves and fewer wider segments. The new species is closely related to P. praeruptorum and P. micrantha based
on molecular data. However, P. micrantha is quite different from P. wanghongiae and P. praeruptorum in its large
pinnatifid leaves. Pedicularis wanghongiae is morphologically mostly approximate to P. praeruptorum, but differs from
the latter mainly in its shorter petiole and upward bend of the galea. Filaments are all pubescent in P. praeruptorum,
while only the anterior filament pair is pubescent on the lower part in P. wanghongiae (Fig. 1D). Furthermore, leaves
of all the samples of the new species are abaxially pubescent along the veins. However, leaves of P. praeruptorum in
some specimens examined are abaxially pubescent along veins, while in some others are almost glabrous, especially
in specimens from Gaoligong Mountains. The recognition of the new species P. wanghongiae is supported by both
morphological and molecular evidence.
Taxonomic treatment
Pedicularis wanghongiae M.L.Liu & W.B.Yu, sp. nov. (Figs. 1, 2A)
Type:—China, Yunnan. Gongshan County, Dulongjiang Township, wet meadow at the top of the mountain, 3,500 m a.s.l., 2 July 2014,
Z.K.Wu, W.Zhou, M.L.Liu & Z.B.Tao HW2014118 (holotype KUN; isotype KUN).
Herbs perennial, 7–16 cm tall, drying slightly black. Roots fascicled, fusiform. Stems erect, densely glandular pubescent.
Leaves basal, cauline leaves absent; petiole 1–2.5 cm long; leaf blade ovate-oblong to oblong-lanceolate, 1.2–2.6 cm,
abaxially white pubescent along veins, adaxially glabrous, pinnatipartite to pinnatisect; segments 5–9 pairs, lanceolate,
pinnatifid, dentate. Inflorescences short racemose; bracts leaflike. Pedicel 5–6 mm long, densely pubescent. Calyx 6–7
mm long, 1/2–2/3 cleft anteriorly, with long hairs along midvein; lobes 5, unequal, posterior lobe smallest, ±entire,
others dentate, with 4 or 5 cleft divisions. Corolla purple or rose-red, white at throat, ca. 1.6 cm long; tube ca. 9 mm
long, glabrous; galea bent at a right angle apically, densely minutely pubescent; beak bent upward, 7–8 mm long; lower
lip ca. 1.6 cm long ×1.7 cm wide, sparsely ciliate, the middle lobe oblong-obovate, projecting and stiped, ca. 1.2 cm
long × 0.9 cm wide. Anterior filament pair pubescent at the lower part, posterior filament pair glabrous. Capsule ovoid-
lanceolate, ca. 1.5 cm long × 0.5 cm wide, not oblique, apex acute. Fl. May–July, fr. July–Oct.
Distribution and habitat:—Currently known only from Dulongjiang Township and Cikai Township, northwestern
Yunnan, China, growing in wet meadow of high mountains at the elevation of 3200–3500 m. Rare.
Etymology:—The species epithet honors our advisor Prof. & Dr. Hong Wang, Kunming Institute of Botany, CAS,
who has been working on the taxonomy and systematics of Pedicularis for 24 years.
Additional specimens examined:—CHINA. Yunnan: Gongshan County, Dulongjiang Townhip, 3200m a.s.l., 26
May 2009, L.M. Gao & Z.R. Zhang GLM092517 (KUN); Gongshan County, Dulongjiang Township, 3500m a.s.l., 2
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60 Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press
July 2014, Z.K. Wu et al. HW2014117 (KUN); Gongshan County, Cikai Township, 3500m a.s.l., 1 July 2014, L. Lu et
al. LL201416 (KUN).
Keys to Pedicularis wanghongiae and its related species in Tsoong’s series Paucifoliatae
1. Leaves almost all basal; leaf blade pinnatipartite to pinnatisect .......................................................................................................2.
- Leaves basal and cauline; leaf blade pinnatifid to pinnatipartite ......................................................................................................6.
2. Petiole longer than leaf blade; beak straight or downward ...............................................................................................................3.
- Petiole almost as long as leaf blade; beak bent upward .............................................................................................P. wanghongiae
3. Inflorescences umbrella; ............................................................................................................................................P. umbelliformis
- Inflorescences not umbrella ...............................................................................................................................................................4.
4. Roots linear; calyx not cleft anteriorly ........................................................................................................................P. tsarungensis
- Roots fusiform; calyx cleft anteriorly ................................................................................................................................................5.
5. Stems glabrous except for lines of hairs .......................................................................................................................P. yunnanensis
- Stems densely glandular pubescent ........................................................................................................................... P. praeruptorum
6. Flowers axillary, lax or in a lax raceme to 20 cm; calyx lobes equal, flabellate, all dentate; middle lobe of lower lip reniform and
hood-like ......................................................................................................................................................................... P. forrestiana
- Inflorescences short racemose; calyx lobes unequal, neither flabellate nor all dentate; middle lobe of lower lip projecting, not
hood-like .......................................................................................................................................................................... P. micrantha
Acknowledgements
We thank Lian-Ming Gao, Lu Lu and Zhi-Rong Zhang for providing samples; Zhi-Kun Wu, Wei Zhou and Zhi-Bin
Tao for their kind help in the field; Steven Callen (Saint Louis University) for the language editing; Peter Heenan
and anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments and suggestions. This study was supported by grants from the
National Key Basic Research Program of China (2014CB954100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China
(31470323, 31200185), and West Light Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y2227111W1).
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APPENDIX S1. DNA accession and voucher information for taxa included in this study
Taxa Voucher Sampling origin ITS rbcLmatKtrnL-F
Pedicularis aloensis Hand.-Mazz. H.Wang et al., 2004-169 Shangeri-La, Yunnan KF277524 KR078261 KR699638 KF277603
P. davidii Franch. W.Jiang & Q.Wang, J-238 Emei, Sichuan JF977531 JF943014 JF955124 KF277631
P. dissectifolia H.L.Li W.B.Yu et al., HW10133 Shangeri-La, Yunnan KF277539 KF277641 KR707763 KF277641
P. lasiophrys Maxim. J.He et al., 1273 Yuzhong, Gansu KR707789 KR707777 KR707755 KR707802
P. longiflora Rudolph W.B.Yu et al., LIDZ-1091 Kangding, Sichuan JF977623 JF943106 JF955215 KF277676
P. longipes Maxim. W.B.Yu et al., HW10305 Yajiang, Sichuan JF977625 JF943108 JF955217 KF277677
P. lutescens Franch. ex Maxim. W.B.Yu et al., LIDZ-1267 Shangeri-La, Yunnan JF977630 JF943113 JF955222 KF277643
P. mayana Hand.-Mazz. Z.K.Wu et al., 20140104B Chayu, Tibet KR707790 KR707773 KR707759 KR707803
P. megalantha D. Don S.D.Zhang & H.J.He, 081191 Nielamu, Tibet JF977645 JF943128 JF955237 KF277684
P. micrantha H.L.Li (1) Z.K.Wu et al., 20140119 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707791 KR707783 KR707766 KR707804
P. micrantha H.L.Li (2) L.Lu et al., WH2013068 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707792 KR707785 KR707767 KR707805
P. nigra (Bonati) Vaniot ex Bonati H.Wang et al., LIDZ-1331 Wuding, Yunnan JF977652 JF943135 JF955244 KF277693
P. oederi Vahl H.Wang et al., 03-053 Deqin, Yunnan JF977654 JF943137 JF955246 KF277695
P. praeruptorum Bonati (1) L.M.Gao et al., GLM-123909 Chayu, Tibet KR707793 KR707788 KR707764 KR707806
P. praeruptorum Bonati (2) X.H.Jin et al., STET0989 Chayu, Tibet KF277574 KR707787 KR707765 KF277707
P. resupinata Linnaeus J.He & P.Ju, LIDZ-544 Weixian, Gansu JF977677 JF943160 JF955268 KF277712
P. rex C. B. Clarke ex Maxim. W.B.Yu & W.Zhou, LIDZ-0979 Guiyang, Guizhou JF977683 JF943166 JF955274 KC733302.1
P. sceptrum-carolinum Linnaeus C.H.Zhou, 1264 Antu, Jilin KR699635 KR078264 KR699641 KR699637
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LIU & YU
62 Phytotaxa 217 (1) © 2015 Magnolia Press
APPENDIX S1. (Continued)
Taxa Voucher Sampling origin ITS rbcLmatKtrnL-F
P. strobilacea Franch. ex Forbes
& Hemsl.
L.M.Gao et al., GLM-123906 Linzhi, Tibet KR707794 KR707780 KR707760 KR707807
P. tenacifolia P. C. Tsoong X.H.Jin et al., STET1394 Bomi, Tibet KF277591 KR707775 KR707757 KF277743
P. tricolor Hand.-Mazz. W.B.Yu et al., YWB-069 Xiangcheng, Sichuan JF977767 JF943250 JF955356 KF277755
P. umbelliformis H.L.Li (1) W.B.Yu et al., HW10134 Shangeri-La, Yunnan JF977774 JF943257 JF955363 KF277757
P. umbelliformis H.L.Li (2) W.B.Yu et al., HW10176 Shangeri-La, Yunnan JF977773 JF943256 JF955362 no data
P. umbelliformis H.L.Li (2) H.Li et al., 31277 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707795 KR707774 KR707758 KR707808
P. verticillata Linnaeus W.B.Yu et al., LIDZ-1114 Jiulong, Sichuan KF277601 KR707772 KR707754 KF277762
P. wanghongiae M.L.Liu
& W.B.Yu (1)
Z.K.Wu et al., 20140117 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707796 KR707781 KR707769 no data
P. wanghongiae M.L.Liu
& W.B.Yu (2)
Z.K.Wu et al., 20140118 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707797 KR707782 KR707770 KR707809
P. wanghongiae M.L.Liu
& W.B.Yu (3)
L.M.Gao & Z.R.Zhang,
GLM092517
Gongshan, Yunnan KF277560 KR707786 KR707771 KF277686
P. wanghongiae M.L.Liu
& W.B.Yu (4)
L.Lu et al., LL201416 Gongshan, Yunnan KR707798 KR707782 KR707768 KR707810
P. yui H. L. Li Z.K.Wu et al., 2014097 Motuo, Tibet KR707799 KR707776 KR707756 KR707811
P. yunnanensis Franch. ex
Maxim. (1)
W.B.Yu et al., 2014087-1 Dali, Yunnan KR707800 KR707778 KR707762 KR707812
P. yunnanensis Franch. ex
Maxim. (2)
W.B.Yu et al., 2014087-2 Dali, Yunnan KR707801 KR707779 KR707761 KR707813
  • ... All DNA samples and voucher specimens are stored at the Germplasm Bank of Wild Species and the herbarium of CAS Kunming Institute of Botany (KUN), respectively. There are 284 sequences from 64 individuals which have been published in other studies [6][7][8]29]. In this study, we generated 62 new sequences from 23 individuals (with 11 newly sampled individuals). ...
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