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Abstract

Wellbeing is the ultimate goal for everyone, not only for adolescence. Present study explored the relationships between gratitude and forgiveness with happiness among college student. A total of 81 undergarduate psychology students were recruited in this study from a private university in Jogjakarta. 29.6% (24) of the sample were males and 70.4% (57) were females. Regression analysis was used to predict the relationship between all variables. Regression analysis predict relationship between gratitude and forgiveness with happiness, explaining 28.9% of the variance (Adjusted R 2 = 0.289).Gratitude give the biggest contribution to happiness (= .536 p= .000), but forgiveness has no significance relationship to happiness (= .078, p= .414). This result means that gratitude is an important factor contributes to happiness among undergraduate student in this sample.
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... There is significant evidence confirming that forgiveness and life satisfaction are related (Dahiya and Rangnekar, 2020a;2020b;Yu et al., 2014). Also, benevolence, forgiveness and affect are the most stable variables that can enhance or improve an individual's life satisfaction (Allemand et al., 2012;Hofer et al., 2006;Safaria, 2014;Sastre et al., 2003). Therefore, more studies, which can offer an overall picture of the associations between the four interrelated variables (benevolence, forgiveness, positive and negative affect), are required to explain these relationships (Dahiya and Rangnekar, 2020b). ...
... Another remarkable study on forgiveness by Gull (2013) revealed that negative affections are aroused by unforgiving imagery whereas positive affections are induced by forgiving imagery. Also, past studies have documented that forgiveness contributes to life satisfaction in such a way that individuals with a high tendency to forgive also score high on positive affect and low on negative affect, which enhances their well-being and life satisfaction (Safaria, 2014;Zhu, 2015). We propose that: ...
... There is significant evidence confirming that forgiveness and life satisfaction are related (Dahiya and Rangnekar, 2020a;2020b;Yu et al., 2014). Also, benevolence, forgiveness and affect are the most stable variables that can enhance or improve an individual's life satisfaction (Allemand et al., 2012;Hofer et al., 2006;Safaria, 2014;Sastre et al., 2003). Therefore, more studies, which can offer an overall picture of the associations between the four interrelated variables (benevolence, forgiveness, positive and negative affect), are required to explain these relationships (Dahiya and Rangnekar, 2020b). ...
... Another remarkable study on forgiveness by Gull (2013) revealed that negative affections are aroused by unforgiving imagery whereas positive affections are induced by forgiving imagery. Also, past studies have documented that forgiveness contributes to life satisfaction in such a way that individuals with a high tendency to forgive also score high on positive affect and low on negative affect, which enhances their well-being and life satisfaction (Safaria, 2014;Zhu, 2015). We propose that: ...
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