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Variation in Macaranga capensis (Euphorbiaceae)
Author(s): I. Friis and M. G. Gilbert
Source:
Kew Bulletin,
Vol. 41, No. 1 (1986), p. 68
Published by: on behalf of Springer Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4103031
Accessed: 04-03-2015 12:35 UTC
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Variation
in
Macaranga
capensis
(Euphorbiaceae)
I. FRIIS* & M.
G.
GILBERT**
Our interest in
Macaranga
originates
from a
study
of
afromontane trees
(IF)
and
preparation
of
an
account
for the Flora of
Ethiopia (MGG).
This
brought
to our attention
the
problem
of
delineating
M.
kilimandscharica from
M.
capensis.
Ethiopian
material is
relatively
uniform
and
matches M.
kilimandscharica
but
Radcliffe-Smith
(in
Kew
Bull. 37:
423,
1982)
had recorded
M.
capensis
from
S
Ethiopia.
Thus we made a
special
study
of
Macaranga
whilst in
Ethiopia
in
1984.
It
was
clear that the
collection
in
question, Chafey
163,
was a
juvenile
shoot
of M.
kilimandscharica
in
the traditional
sense. We
subsequently
studied
all Kew
material of
the two taxa. The
cordate,
densely hairy
leaves of M.
capensis
against
the
round-based,
subglabrous,
often
glaucous
leaves of M.
kilimandscharica do
in
fact
correlate with the
difference
between
juvenile
and
adult
shoots
of
the latter. Thus
M.
capensis
can
be
regarded
as a
neotenous form
and sterile
material,
in
which
it is not
possible
to
tell
the
maturity
of the
plant,
and
juvenile
shoots of M.
kilimandscharica
cannot be
reliably
named.
Even with
flowering
material,
the
placement
of some
collections seems
arbitrary.
To-
gether
the
two taxa
range
from
S Natal to
Ethiopia;
the
region
of
overlap
between
good
examples
of them
extends from
Malawi,
the
southern limit
of
typical
M.
kilimandscharica,
to
Kenya,
the
northern
limit
of
typical
M.
capensis.
It seems clear
to us that it is
impossible
to
keep up
two
distinct
species.
The
apparent
lack
of
any
clear-cut
spatial
separation
argues against recognition
of
subspecies
though
a name is
available at this
rank. As the two
extremes are
quite
distinct,
it seems to us
most useful
to
treat them as
varieties,
and the
necessary
new combination is
made.
Macaranga
capensis
Baill. var.
kilimandscharica
(Pax)
Friis
& Gilbert
comb.
et
stat. nov.
M.
kilimandscharica
Pax,
in
Engl.,
Pflanzenw.
O.
Afr. C:
238
(1895). Type:
Tanzania,
Kilimandjaro,
Volkens
1271
(lectotype
K,
selected
here).
M.
lophostigma
Chiov.
in
Atti
R.
Accad. d'Italia
Mem.
Cl. Sc.
Fis. etc.
11:
55
(1940).
Type:
Ethiopia,
Wellega,
Giordano
2461,
not
2471
as
cited
in
proto-
logue
(holotype
FT).
M.
kilimandscharica
subsp.
giordanoi
('giordanii')
Cufod.
in
Senk.
biol. 39:
308-9,
t.
8
(1958).
Type
as for
M.
lophostigma.
*Institute
of
Systematic Botany,
University
of
Copenhagen,
140
Gothersgade,
DK-1123
Copenhagen
K,
Denmark.
**Ethiopian
Flora
Project,
c/o
R. B.
G.,
Kew.
68
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