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PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF WATER SAMPLES FROM SELECTED WATER BODIES IN AND AROUND ACCRA, GHANA

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Abstract

Environmental degradation through industrial, agricultural and domestic activities is a major public health issue globally. The discharge of domestic and industrial effluents without prior treatment has led to the pollution of water bodies in and around Accra in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Water quality can be ascertained via the analysis of various physical and chemical parameters. The present study determined the physico-chemical characteristics (pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, turbidity, true colour) and concentrations of selected heavy metals (cadmium, copper, manganese and lead) of water samples from four water bodies in and around Accra. The values of the physico-chemical parameters indicate that the four water bodies are heavily polluted with the level of pollution, especially in the Korle Lagoon, increasing over the period. Out of the four heavy metals analysed, the Kpeshie lagoon was mainly polluted with cadmium, copper and manganese whilst cadmium, copper and lead were found in the Korle Lagoon. The Chemu Lagoon was highly contaminated with cadmium and copper whilst the Odaw River was highly contaminated with manganese and lead.

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... A comprehensive study of heavy metal levels in the biotic components of West African urban wetland ecosystems is generally missing. Whilst studies of heavy metal concentrations can lead to the identification of species for bioremediation and mitigation of public health problems, the isolated studies of heavy metal pollution in West African wetlands are generally restricted to sediment, fish and water (Acheampong et al. 2014;Klake et al. 2013;Laar et al. 2011). Wetland organisms such as plankton, macrophytes, insects, crabs and fish can be linked to the human food chain, and therefore, a holistic assessment of the heavy metal content of the components of urban wetland ecosystems would help wetland researchers and other stakeholders to determine the public health implication of the dependency on food chains connected to specific urban wetlands. ...
... Of the five heavy metals analysed in this study, Cd concentration was the highest followed in decreasing order by As, Hg, Cu and Pb at Sakumo II. Comparatively, the concentrations of the heavy metals in this study are comparable with those reported earlier for water and sediment in Sakumo Lagoon (Laar et al., 2011) but lower than those reported by Acheampong et al. (2014) for some other urban lagoons in Ghana. The study of Acheampong et al. (2014) however involved extremely polluted urban lagoons that are considered to be no longer supporting aquatic life (Gordon et al. 1998). ...
... Comparatively, the concentrations of the heavy metals in this study are comparable with those reported earlier for water and sediment in Sakumo Lagoon (Laar et al., 2011) but lower than those reported by Acheampong et al. (2014) for some other urban lagoons in Ghana. The study of Acheampong et al. (2014) however involved extremely polluted urban lagoons that are considered to be no longer supporting aquatic life (Gordon et al. 1998). Further, the concentrations reported in this study are lower than those previously reported in water and sediment from mining areas in Ghana (Serfor-Armah et al. 2006;Akabzaa et al. 2007). ...
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Vegetable s grown at environmentally contaminated sites in Sahre Rey could take up and accumulate metals at concentrations that are probably toxic to human health. This study was conducted to analyze the metal contents of some vegetables in Sahre Rey-Iran with emphasis on their toxicological implications. Recently maturedleaf and fruit samples of Shahre rey vegetable farms were sampled and analyzed to determine heavy metals. Data showed,that metal uptake differences by the vegetables are attributed to plant differences in toleranceto heavy metals and vegetable species. The lead concentration in all vegetable samples,was,more than maximum permitted concentrations, while Cd pollution was observed in radish, Cress, Dill, spinach and eggplant.Data showed that Zn concentrationin Celery, Mint, Dill, Spinach and Green pepper were more than Zn permitted level. There was no evidence about Cu contaminationin vegetables. Data also showed that the intakeof most of the metals constitutes less than the TMDI (theoretical maximum,daily intake) at present and hence health risk isminimal. But with increase in vegetable consumption by the community,the situation could worsen in the future. Treatment of industrial effluents and phyto-extr Investigation of Metals Accumulation in Some Vegetables Irrigated with Waste Water in Shahre Rey-Iran and Toxicological Implications // var SiteRoot = 'http://academic.research.microsoft.com'; // 0) {$('.input-box-advanced-yearquery').eq(0).show();}} else hideAdvancedSearch();}function CheckAdvInput(objName,len){var obj=document.getElementById(objName); if(obj.value.length>len){obj.value=obj.value.substring(0,len);}};function hideAdvancedSearch(){document.getElementById('advancedsearchDiv').style.display='none';delCookie('advanceTabIndex');if(document.getElementById('divYearFilter'))document.getElementById('divYearFilter').style.display = '';}//]]> Sign in Advanced Search Author | Conference | Journal | Organization | Year | DOI Look for results that meet for the following criteria: sinceequal tobeforebetweenand // Search in all fields of study Limit my searches in the following fields of study Agriculture ScienceArts & HumanitiesBiologyChemistryComputer ScienceEconomics & BusinessEngineeringEnvironmental SciencesGeosciencesMaterial ScienceMathematicsMedicinePhysicsSocial ScienceMultidisciplinary BindEventForDomainPanelButton("ctl00_SearchHeader_SearchForm_txtQuery", "ctl00_SearchHeader_SearchForm_divDomainButton"); // // var isSilverlightInstalled = false; function CheckSilverlightInstalled() { try { try { var slControl = new ActiveXObject('AgControl.AgControl'); //IE isSilverlightInstalled = true; } catch (e) { if (navigator.plugins["Silverlight Plug-In"]) //non-IE { isSilverlightInstalled = true; } } } catch (e) { } } CheckSilverlightInstalled(); $(function () { $(".ranklist-summary").css("position", "static"); $(".ranklist-summary").css("position", "relative"); }) Keywords (10) East Asia Environmental Contaminant Health Risk Heavy Metal Human Health Middle East Pepper Waste Water South America South Africa Subscribe Academic PublicationsInvestigation of Metals Accumulation in Some Vegetables Irrigated with Waste Water in Shahre Rey-Iran and Toxicological Implications Investigation of Metals Accumulation in Some Vegetables Irrigated with Waste Water in Shahre Rey-Iran and Toxicological Implications,Mohsen Bigdeli,Mo Edit Investigation of Metals Accumulation in Some Vegetables Irrigated with Waste Water in Shahre Rey-Iran and Toxicological Implications (Citations: 4) BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download Mohsen Bigdeli, Mohsen Seilsepour Abstract:Vegetable s grown at environmentally contaminated sites in Sahre Rey could take up and accumulate metals at concentrations that are probably toxic to human health. This study was conducted to analyze the metal contents of some vegetables in Sahre Rey-Iran with emphasis on their toxicological implications. Recently maturedleaf and fruit samples of Shahre rey vegetable farms were sampled and analyzed to determine heavy metals. Data showed,that metal uptake differences by the vegetables are attributed to plant differences in toleranceto heavy metals and vegetable species. The lead concentration in all vegetable samples,was,more than maximum permitted concentrations, while Cd pollution was observed in radish, Cress, Dill, spinach and eggplant.Data showed that Zn concentrationin Celery, Mint, Dill, Spinach and Green pepper were more than Zn permitted level. There was no evidence about Cu contaminationin vegetables. Data also showed that the intakeof most of the metals constitutes less than the TMDI (theoretical maximum,daily intake) at present and hence health risk isminimal. But with increase in vegetable consumption by the community,the situation could worsen in the future. Treatment of industrial effluents and phyto-extraction of excess metals from polluted environments could reduce health risk. Key words: Metals accumulation ・ Toxicological Implication ・Shahre Rey ・Iran INTRODUCTION North and South Africa, South America, Middle East, Vegetables constitute an important part of the human,significantpart of Central and,East Asia is irrigate d Cumulative Annual View Publication The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search. 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Halim Avci. Trace metals in vegetables grown with municipal and industrial wastewa... ...The values obtained falls below the 425 mg/kg set by WHO as the safe maximum limit [15]......It was not detected in Talinum triangulare from two sites AFB and NB. The highest concentration (0.11mg/kg) of cadmium was observed in Capsicum annum which is about the maximum value set by the WHO standard for vegetables [15]... J. A. Kagbu, et al. TRACE METAL CONTENTS OF SOME COMMON VEGETABLES GROWN ON IRRIGATED FARM... References (16) A global assessment of natural sources of atmospheric trace metals (Citations: 450) Jerome O. Nriagu Journal: Nature , vol. 338, no. 6210, pp. 47-49, 1989 New aspects on the distribution and metabolism of essential trace elements after dietary exposure to toxic metals (Citations: 33) M. Abdulla, J. 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A. Wheaton Journal: Clinical Neurophysiology - CLIN NEUROPHYSIOL , vol. 121, pp. S29-S29, 2010 TRACE METAL CONTENTS OF SOME COMMON VEGETABLES GROWN ON IRRIGATED FARMS ALONG THE BANKS OF RIVER BENUE WITHIN MAKURDI METROPOLIS J. A. Kagbu, E. B. Agbaji, C. E. Gimba Search in all fields of study Limit my searches in the following fields of study Agriculture ScienceArts & HumanitiesBiologyChemistryComputer ScienceEconomics & BusinessEngineeringEnvironmental SciencesGeosciencesMaterial ScienceMathematicsMedicinePhysicsSocial ScienceMultidisciplinary // Help | Feedback | Follow Us | Terms of Use | Specific Terms | Trademarks | Privacy & Cookies | Survey ©2013 Microsoft Corporation. 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Bioremediation of arsenic, chromium, lead, and mercury. The status of the application of biological treatment to clean up hazardous metals from the earth's subsurface (i.e., in situ bioremediation) Report
  • A Adeniji
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