Article

OpenURL linking with Google Scholar

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

The integration of the Open URL links for libraries in Google Scholar is discussed. It can recognize users based on IP addresses or users can set their preferences for a particular library. The holdings information from libraries is used to determine when to emphasize the full-text links for users to give users a visual indication that their institutional affiliations have made the full text available to them. When the full text is not available , the link appears in a smaller font below the citation. Google Scholar will pave the way for librarians to integrate their resources more fully into other free search engines, providing access to the entire range of services libraries have to offer by utilizing the OpenURL.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... The recent incorporation of books in Google Scholar from Google Book Search (which after a poor debut with deficient software features, turned around and introduced within a month far more sophisticated software than Google Scholar in three years), spawned useful research (Hauer, 2006; Lackie, 2006; Goldeman and Connolly, 2007), as did the only good new software feature of Google Scholar which led users to the full-text digital source document in the users' library through Open-URL resolvers (Grogg and Ferguson, 2005; O'Hara, 2007; Lagace and Chisman, 2007). ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to revisit Google Scholar. Design/methodology/approach – This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of Google Scholar. Findings – The Google Books project has given a massive and valuable boost to the already rich and diverse content of Google Scholar. The downside of the growth is that significant gaps remain for top ranking journals and serials, and the number of duplicate, triplicate and quadruplicate records for the same source documents (which Google Scholar cannot detect reliably) has increased. Originality/value – This paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of Google Scholar.
... In 2003, the CINAHL database, soon after acquired by EBSCO, also enabled links to local library holdings [11]. Furthermore, Google Scholar debuted in 2004, added open uniform resource locator (URL) links to library holdings in 2005, and quickly became used as a supplement to CINAHL and MEDLINE [12]. Due to such changes in the extent of literature available to pediatric nursing researchers and its ease of access, the purpose of the present study was to update Taylor's findings and to investigate the library resources most frequently used by today's pediatric nurse researchers. ...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify core journals and other types of literature cited in four major pediatric nursing journals and to characterize coverage of these resources in major bibliographic databases. The study was part of the ‘‘Mapping the Literature of Nursing Project’’ of the Medical Library Association’s Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section. It updates a similar analysis published in 2006 and determines whether citation patterns have changed over time.Methods: Cited references from articles published in 4 pediatric nursing journals between 2011 and 2013 were collected. Cited journal titles were ranked according to number of times cited and analyzed according to Bradford’s Law of Scattering and the 80/20 rule to identify the most frequently cited journals. Five databases were surveyed to assess the coverage of the most-often-cited journals. The most frequently cited non-journal sources were also identified.Results: Journals were the most frequently cited sources, followed by books, government documents, Internet resources, and miscellaneous resources. Most cited sources were cited within ten years of their publication, which was particularly true for government documents and Internet resources. Scopus had complete coverage of the most frequently cited journals, whereas PubMed had nearly complete coverage.Conclusions: Compared with the 2006 study, the list of top-cited journals referenced by pediatric nursing researchers has remained relatively stable, but the number of cited journal titles has increased. Book citations have declined, and Internet and government document references have increased. These findings suggest that librarians should retain subscriptions to frequently cited journal titles, provide efficient document delivery of articles from infrequently used journals, deemphasize but not eliminate books, and connect patrons with useful open-access Internet resources.
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify core journals and other types of literature cited in four major pediatric nursing journals and to characterize coverage of these resources in major bibliographic databases. The study was part of the ‘‘Mapping the Literature of Nursing Project’’ of the Medical Library Association’s Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section. It updates a similar analysis published in 2006 and determines whether citation patterns have changed over time. Methods: Cited references from articles published in 4 pediatric nursing journals between 2011 and 2013 were collected. Cited journal titles were ranked according to number of times cited and analyzed according to Bradford’s Law of Scattering and the 80/20 rule to identify the most frequently cited journals. Five databases were surveyed to assess the coverage of the most-often-cited journals. The most frequently cited non-journal sources were also identified. Results: Journals were the most frequently cited sources, followed by books, government documents, Internet resources, and miscellaneous resources. Most cited sources were cited within ten years of their publication, which was particularly true for government documents and Internet resources. Scopus had complete coverage of the most frequently cited journals, whereas PubMed had nearly complete coverage. Conclusions: Compared with the 2006 study, the list of top-cited journals referenced by pediatric nursing researchers has remained relatively stable, but the number of cited journal titles has increased. Book citations have declined, and Internet and government document references have increased. These findings suggest that librarians should retain subscriptions to frequently cited journal titles, provide efficient document delivery of articles from infrequently used journals, deemphasize but not eliminate books, and connect patrons with useful open-access Internet resources.
Article
Full-text available
In March 2003 the University of Mississippi Libraries made our MetaSearch tool publicly available. After a year of working with this product and integrating it into the library Web site, a wide variety of libraries interested in our implementation process and experiences began to call. Libraries interested in this product have included consortia, public, and academic libraries in the United States, Mexico, and Europe. This article was written in an effort to share the recommendations and concerns given. Much of the advice is general and could be applied to many of the MetaSearch tools available. Google Scholar and other open Web initiatives that could impact the future of MetaSearching are also discussed.
Article
Full-text available
Since its introduction in November 2004, Google Scholar has been the subject of considerable discussion among librarians. Though there has been much concern about the lack of transparency of the product, there has been relatively little direct comparison between Google Scholar and traditional library resources. This study compares Google Scholar and Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) as resources for finding chemistry information. Of the 702 records found in six different searches, 65.1% were in Google Scholar and 45.1% were in CAS. Of these, 55.0% were unique to Google Scholar, 34.9% were unique to CAS, and 10.1% overlapped. When each record found was searched by title in the two databases, the figures change, with 79.5% in Google Scholar, 85.6% in CAS, and 65.1% overlapping. Based on this, researchers are more likely to find known published information through CAS than in Google Scholar. Results vary by type of search, type of resource, and date. For many types of searching, CAS performs significantly better than Google Scholar. This is especially true for searches on compounds or a personal name, both of which take advantage of advanced search features in CAS. For simple keyword searches, Google Scholar tends to perform better, most probably because Google Scholar searches through the full text of journal articles, while a keyword search through CAS only finds abstract and index terms.
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the Open Access publishing experience of researchers in an academic research institution, in a developing country, Trinidad and Tobago, namely at the University of the West Indies (UWI) St. Augustine Campus. It considers UWI researchers' knowledge of Open Access, their access to the scholarly literature, Open Access Archives/Repositories at UWI and related issues of Research and Library funding and Information Communication Technology (ICT) Infrastructure/Internet connectivity. The article concludes that whilst Open Access publishing yields some obvious and well-documented benefits for developing country researchers, including free access to research articles and increased impact and visibility of "published" Open Access articles, there are some disincentives that militate against developing country researchers fully contributing to the global body of knowledge via Open Access. It finds that Open Access Journals are beneficial for scholars who consume information but are of little benefit for developing country scholars wanting to publish in these journals because of the high cost of page charges. Inadequate and unreliable ICT infrastructure and Internet connectivity also often limit access to information. It concludes that because of technical, financial, human and infrastructural limitations, Open Access via the Green Road of self-archiving is also often not an option for developing country researchers. These researchers are therefore unable to reap the real benefits, of making their research Open Access, that of increased impact and visibility.This study is to develop and evaluate methods and instruments for assessing the usability of digital libraries. It discusses the dimensions of usability, what methods have been applied in evaluating usability of digital libraries, their applicability, and criteria. It is found in the study that there exists an interlocking relationship among effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. It provides operational criteria for effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, and learnability. It discovers users' criteria on "ease of use," "organization of information," "terminology and labeling," "visual attractiveness," and "mistake recovery." Common causes of "user lostness" were found. "Click cost" was examined.
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses Google Scholar as an extension of Fred Kilgour's goal to improve the availability of information. Kilgour was instrumental in the early development of the online library catalog, and he proposed passage retrieval to aid in information seeking. Google Scholar is a direct descendent of these technologies foreseen by Kilgour. Google Scholar holds promise as a means for libraries to expand their reach to new user communities, and to enable libraries to provide quality resources to users during their online search process.
Article
Many published studies examine the effectiveness of Google Scholar (Scholar) as an index for scholarly articles. This paper analyzes the value of Scholar in finding and labeling online full text of articles using titles from the citations of engineering faculty publications. For the fields of engineering and the engineering colleges in the study, Scholar identified online access for 25% of the chemical engineering and 13% of the mechanical engineering citations. During the study the format that Scholar (which is in beta version) used to present the result set changed. This change now makes discovery of online access to full text of an article readily apparent when it occurs.
Article
The role of Google Scholar as a tool of importance in the information industry or libraries is discussed. The launch of Google Scholar gives searchers a tremendous opportunity to communicate to the clients about the supplemental tools available. Searchers can anticipate the ways in which output from other tools or research processes could integrate with Google Scholar searching and its results. For those who want to expand their search from the subsets of authoritative content to the World Wide Web, Google Scholar can conduct a GoogleWeb search from Scholar result hits, simplifying the anticipated Google-to-Google search strategy.