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From Game to War and Other Psychoanalytic Essays on Folklore

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... However, other myths actually take place after the creation of the world, but the events they describe are ones that recreated the universe or humanity -usually after a destruction of the previous reality. An example of this can be found in flood myths (Dundes 1997). Reading the end of May, 1967, in mythic terms, the approaching war was assessed as an event that could bring an end to the Jewish state. ...
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The clash of June 1967, called by Israelis the Six-Day War and by Palestinians the Naksa (setback), is a critical milestone within the longstanding Israeli- Palestinian conflict. Despite all the scholarly attention ever since, there remain unheard voices and untold stories. It is the personal stories of people in the region that are at the center of this book. How do they remember 1967? How were their lives affected, even changed dramatically as a result of that short war? Listening to their stories as told some 50 years later, an incomplete tapestry of memories and understandings emerge. This book is the product of a re- search collaboration among Palestinian, Israeli and European folklorists, cultural anthropologists and sociologists. The personal stories were collected in the framework of interviews with men and women from all walks of life, on the days before, during and after this dramatic confrontation. The book is comprised of eleven chapters based on a corpus of several hundred conversations, as well as eight representative interviews. Together they afford insight into differential memories and sensations, visions of euphoria and despair, newly revived hopes, pain and disappointment, disillusionment and repentance.
... However, other myths actually take place after the creation of the world, but the events they describe are ones that recreated the universe or humanity -usually after a destruction of the previous reality. An example of this can be found in flood myths (Dundes 1997). Reading the end of May, 1967, in mythic terms, the approaching war was assessed as an event that could bring an end to the Jewish state. ...
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The existence and variability of human-made rock cairns in subalpine and alpine settings of Southeast Alaska is increasingly well documented. Whete these features were constructed prehistorically and prorohistorically is a fundamental component to assessing the socioecological role of these modifications to a landscape that is, for the most patt, devoid of other physical manifestations of past human activities. Based on information compiled from investigations in the northern portion of Baranof Island and vicinity, we explore the physical and social environmental conditions that may underlie decisions to create the cairns, some of which are estimated to have been built approximately 500 to 1500 years before present (YBP). Exploratory spatial analyses of the Iocational attributes of these rock features is pursued with the goal of assessing possible Tlingit activities in this subalpine and alpine environment while embracing the evolvement of social significance attached to this setting.
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The existence and variability of human-made rock cairns in subalpine and alpine settings of Southeast Alaska is increasingly well documented. Where these features were constructed prehistorically and protohistorically is a fundamental component to assessing the socioecological role of these modifications to a landscape that is, for the most part, devoid of other physical manifestations of past human activities. Based on information compiled from investigations in the northern portion of Baran of Island and vicinity, we explore the physical and social environmental conditions that may underlie decisions to create the cairns, some of which are estimated to have been built approximately 500 to 1500 years before present (ybp). Exploratory spatial analyses of the locational attributes of these rock features is pursued with the goal of assessing possible Tlingit activities in this subalpine and alpine environment while embracing the evolvement of social significance attached to this setting. © 2018 by the Alaska Anthropological Association. All rights reserved.
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A vast body of research has, following Foucault, shown the scientific study of sexuality to be central to the construction of modernity and its Others, and to biopolitical categories of personhood and citizenship. Similarly, much historical work has acknowledged the critical role of the Eastern European Other in imagining the modern European West. Yet while representations of sexuality were critical to Eastern Europe’s invention, and have been increasingly visible elements of re-emerging European “neo-orientalisms,” there has been little scholarly concern with how such symbolic and political hierarchies were constructed through the historical intersections of ethnographic and sexual scientific practice, or with this history’s biopolitical implications. This paper examines the intersection of several such sexual-scientific imaginings. Focusing on the conjuncture between Hungarian scholar Géza Róheim’s psychoanalytic interpretations of European folklore and non-European ethnography, Sigmund Freud’s orientalizing construction of the key psychoanalytic concept of “phobia,” and scholarly analyses of postsocialist sexual politics, I argue that these intersecting scientific works joined evolutionist understandings of culture to theories of universal psychic development to read Eastern Europe as a site of psycho-sexual and civilizational immaturity, producing mutually-reinforcing narratives that fabricated Eastern European sexuality as a biopolitical marker of European difference. These overlapping sexual geotemporalities, I suggest, continue to inform current scholarly interpretations of postsocialist homophobia, (re)producing both Hungary and Eastern Europe as naturalized sites of homophobia, primitivity, and failed sexual citizenship, and rendering hegemonic the status of the region and its inhabitants as sexual Others of “European” modernity. By fabricating postsocialist homophobia as a scientific “fact,” such layered discourses sustain the biopolitical boundaries of modern European citizenship.
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. This article critiques the ‘cultural turn’ in Italian Risorgimento historiography by examining Italian Switzerland, and specifically Ticino. This area paradoxically aided and abetted Italian patriots, especially Giuseppe Mazzini, yet rejected becoming part of the Italian national project. This paradox is heightened by the fact that the vast majority of the Italian nationalist literary canon, as identified by Alberto Maria Banti, was republished in Ticino. The paradox is explained in terms of the conflict between long-standing traditions of local autonomy and the idea of any form of uniform or centralised control, as originally represented by the Cisalpine Republic and then by both versions (Napoleonic and Piedmontese) of the Kingdom of Italy. However, I also use Banti's cultural concepts to demonstrate the creation of a powerful counter-myth of Italian Swiss nationalism in the character of William Tell.
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The terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11 2001 inspired an outpouring of electronic folklore, particularly ‘photoshops’ (humorous digitally-altered photographs). This material is of two types. One, the newslore of vengeance, consists of fantasies of annihilation or humiliation aimed at Osama bin Laden or Afghanistan. The other, the newslore of victimization, expresses bewilderment at the role of fate or chance in who lived and died on that terrible day. This article analyzes the newslore of September 11 in light of Elliott Oring’s ‘unspeakability’ hypothesis: the material expresses emotions that were too raw to be covered in the news media and thus functions as both an outlet for those emotions and a protest against the decorousness of the press.
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Virtually all cosmogonies but ours are overtly sexual. What is it about? Prurience? Stupidity? And as Descartes didn't say, 'I fuck therefore I am.'? Sibhat Gebre-Igzï'abhiér is one of the modernist writers who are highly influential in the realm of Amharic literature. His works of art most often are the result of his literary experimentation. He applies different concepts and theories in his works despite the fact that it brings him in conflict with society and its values.1 Myth and sexuality among other things are common motifs that run through all his works, mainly in Létum Aynegalliñ, and subject him to different critics. He also raises modern issues that are highly mythological. In addition to using existing myths in literary organization, his works create their own myths. This in effect makes these works of art easier for mythopoeic reading.2 Létum Aynegalliñ (literally "the night never ends for me") represents the relation between myth and literature. This novel is highly mythic. Myth, mainly in this novel, has contributed a lot for textual organization. The novel is filled with sexually painted narratives, prayers, verses, or other texts taken from Ethiopian classical religious books, sacred homilies, and others. The novel and sacred homilies are to be read intertextually in different ways. The novel parodies the religious and mythical homilies, while on the other hand the chapters and sections tend to seem more of a pastiche. It is packed with many biblical allusions. The parody and pastiche are used as beginnings and endings for the story, at the same time maintaining the flow of the narration. The pastiche creates a poetic tempo, structural parallelism, and symmetry of form within the novel. The allusion helps in guiding the narration's journey, setting frames connecting time and space between chapters, and bringing different situations together. Among the eight chapters of the novel, the names given to the four are taken from names of religious books written in Ge'ez, Ethiopia's classical language: Chapter one: Lamentations of Menase, Chapter three: Adventure (Saint Life) of Tilahun, Chapter four: Miracles of Kinfe, and Chapter five: Secrets of Petros. In Létum Aynegalliñ, the principal characters are men in their early ages and prostitutes. Most of these men have either finished their college education or got the chance to attend college but preferred to join the world of work or dropped out of college. The women are different in almost every respect except for their prostitution. The place these men meet these women is called Wube Berha ("Wube Desert"), which is outside of the boundaries, outside the field provided by society. It is a red-light district for lost souls, a dark and troubled world of conflict, isolation, and anxiety. The whole story of this novel revolves around Wube Berha and what goes on in these people's life from dusk till midnight. Létum Aynegalliñ depicts the pleasures, longings, and desires of complicated characters in a world which is totally different from where they came. There is nothing that the place and the characters miss out of the night life. They commit what they call "the worst sin of all" in their pursuit of their strange hedonistic activities (4). All these scenes are pieced together to form a broad picture of the chaotic experience in Wube Berha's life. In each and every move and action of these characters, we find sex as their center of gravity, which controls the circulation of their life-blood unceasingly. Eroticism, violence, and perversity are major scenes in making Wube Berha the chaotic world that it is. All these things are, however, pictured in Létum Aynegalliñ with no attempt to veil anything. Their dialogue flows as it is with no consideration to what the general public believes to be completely unethical and destructive of the society's values or standards. The language of the first person self-conscious character-narrator's narration moves along in tandem with the characters' behaviors and actions. At this juncture, it would be useful to study one of the central characters and a mythic figure, Tilahun, who helps the reader fully understand and appreciate...
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This article contains some content of a graphic and disturbing nature and is intended for mature readers. Scholars of high school age or younger are invited to read the article A Model for Collecting and Interpreting: World Trade Center Disaster Jokes by the same author.
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