Chapter

Social justice in counseling and clinical psychology

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

(from the chapter): We suggest that the major challenge within both counseling and clinical specialties in psychology is to address resistance, collusion, or passive acceptance of injustice within these specialties as well as within the discipline of psychology and related structures (e.g. universities, health policy, service organizations). As specialties within psychology concerned with promoting mental health and healing, counseling and clinical psychology must make progress towards integrating social justice into the very meaning of the specialties….Without integrating social justice into the fabric of the specialties, there is a risk of confirming the view of mental health practice and research as “encompassing the use of social power and functioning as a handmaiden of the status quo” (Sue & Sue, 1999, p. 71). An ecological model of reciprocal influence emphasizes that systems—including psychological specialties—are made up of individuals. The responsibility for the values, policies, practices, and effects of these systems is therefore within each and every individual [psychologist]….Our call to action for counseling and clinical specialties [as detailed in this chapter] is for the individuals and organizations to consider how their actions can transform these professional specialties to contribute to social justice. It is critical to take up the call, to act, individually, systemically, and as a community devoted to health and justice.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... For example, although there has been more attention paid to race and ethnicity in clinical settings, there is variability within applied subfields. For example, counseling and community psychology center issues of ethnocultural responsiveness and racial equity as part of their core mission (Toporek & Suyemoto, 2014). Race and ethnicity have also received less than substantial attention in basic research in areas such as cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. ...
Article
Full-text available
https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf
... For example, although there has been more attention paid to race and ethnicity in clinical settings, there is variability within applied subfields. For example, counseling and community psychology center issues of ethnocultural responsiveness and racial equity as part of their core mission (Toporek & Suyemoto, 2014). Race and ethnicity have also received less than substantial attention in basic research in areas such as cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. ...
... (Delgado- Romero, Lau, & Shullman, 2012), and prevention(Delgado-Romero et al., 2012;Toporek, Kwan, & Williams, 2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
The counseling psychology Model Training Program (MTP) was written to reflect new developments in counseling psychology, the American Psychological Association, and the world. The updated MTP is aspirational, intended to guide the development and maintenance of counseling psychology programs. The MTP conforms to the American Psychological Association’s and the Society of Counseling Psychology’s standards and guidelines. A strategic task group appointed by 2015 Society president James W. Lichtenberg sought feedback from the field to assist in its formulation, and the executive boards of the Society and the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs approved the final version. The 2017 MTP consists of four core values (i.e., growth toward full potential, holistic and contextual, diversity and social justice, communitarian perspective) as well as 20 principles grouped into six clusters: counseling psychology identity; multiculturalism, diversity, and social justice; health service psychology; developmental, prevention, and strengths orientation; science–practice integration; and relationships within and between professional communities.
... The latter question was especially meaningful to us because in our roles as therapists, educators, and researchers, we have power. With that power, we believe, comes an ethical responsibility to deepen the basis of our cultural sensitivity and competence; to use nuanced power analyses to avoid reifying the stereotypes we are attempting to resist; and to build relational coalitions across differences to promote social justice (Toporek & Suyemoto, 2014). ...
Thesis
Full-text available
The present thesis aims to map the way that feminist epistemes, as critical of knowledge in the modernity, interrogate the research in developmental psychology. This mapping was based on the analysis of the course of 15 years of research that deals with the youth crossed by the markers of genres and sexualities. In the first chapters, a description of the psychology paths before the gender, feminists and queer issue is made. Afterwards, two moments of production of executed researches are analyzed. A first phase carried out inside the morality studies field is influenced by the feminists epistemologies which criticize the universalism and androcentrism in science. In this perspective, the differences between men and women are highlighted from investigations that bring the female experience with ethical conflicts situations, breaking with the analysis regarding the morality that starts from a rational and abstract subject. The tensioning of the relations between cognition and affection and its outcomes in other dichotomies is emphasized: the public and private, justice ethics and care ethics, as ways to go through the presence and existence of female perspectives when it comes to the construction of moral values. In a second phase, we operate with feminist and queer critics about science and gender in the production of knowledge, establishing themes and methodologies linked to situated and intersectional learnings. Gender is still an interrogator of research in developmental psychology, although from a perforformatized perspective (non-binary and non-deterministic) of positivation of differences, which blurs and reviews the nature and culture concepts and their consequent ethical implications of/in research about youths, genders and sexualities. This is done from researches that draw upon methodologies which are narrative and situated, seeking symmetrical processes of survey on themes such as love, violence and technologies. The thesis is concluded with the possible contributions of this course when it comes to thinking the research on sexualities and genders, from age markers like youth. Furthermore, this work interrogates the contributions of contemporary feminisms concerning the production of more symmetrical policies of writing and research in psychology that problematize the universal, rational, adult, heterosexual, white, cisgender subject.
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter argues that cultural competence advocacy is characterized by a palpable viewpoint bias. This bias is rooted in the distinction between the “unconstrained” versus “constrained” sociopolitical visions as articulated by Sowell (A conflict of visions: ideological origins of political struggles. William Morrow, New York, 1987). This bias has palpable effects on students in graduate school, academic publishing, grant reviews, and professional organizations representing psychology. Seven anonymous interviewees, representing accomplished scholars and/or higher education administrators with backgrounds in school psychology, counseling psychology, clinical psychology, and psychiatry, provide comments related to their experiences with viewpoint bias throughout their professional careers.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.