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Abstract Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of dentists towards CBCT in Mangalore, Karnataka, India and to assess the awareness of CBCT among dentists. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire of 23 multiple choice questions was given to 200 dentists working in reputed institutions in and around Mangalore .The questionnaire was given to the participants which took approximately 20 minutes for completion. Descriptive statistics was calculated in terms of frequencies and percentages. Results: All the participants of the survey were aware of CBCT and considered it to be a useful diagnostic tool in dentistry. The participants also believed CBCT had lower radiation dose compared to medical CT and data reconstruction could be performed easily in CBCT. The majority of the participants also reported that adequate teaching was not imparted regarding CBCT in educational institutions but were willing to attend courses and update knowledge on CBCT if provided with opportunities. Conclusion: CBCT has an important role in the diagnosis of oral and maxillofacial pathologies with reduction in radiation dose. The information obtained from the study highlighted the need for adapting to new technologies like CBCT and regular continuing education programmes, post graduate education courses, meetings and seminars are required to update dentists’ knowledge. The study also highlighted majority of participants believed CBCT are the ultimate diagnostic tool in dentistry and research
Citation: Shetty SR, Castelino RL, Babu SG, Prasanna, Laxmana AR and Roopashri K. Knowledge and Attitude
of Dentists towards Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Mangalore – A Questionnaire Survey. Austin J Radiol.
2015;2(2): 1016.
Austin J Radiol - Volume 2 Issue 2 - 2015
Submit your Manuscript | www.austinpublishinggroup.com
Shetty et al. © All rights are reserved
Austin Journal of Radiology
Open Access
Abstract
Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the
knowledge and attitude of dentists towards CBCT in Mangalore, Karnataka,
India and to assess the awareness of CBCT among dentists.
Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire of 23 multiple
choice questions was given to 200 dentists working in reputed institutions in and
around Mangalore .The questionnaire was given to the participants which took
approximately 20 minutes for completion. Descriptive statistics was calculated
in terms of frequencies and percentages.
Results: All the participants of the survey were aware of CBCT and
considered it to be a useful diagnostic tool in dentistry. The participants
also believed CBCT had lower radiation dose compared to medical CT and
data reconstruction could be performed easily in CBCT. The majority of the
participants also reported that adequate teaching was not imparted regarding
CBCT in educational institutions but were willing to attend courses and update
knowledge on CBCT if provided with opportunities.
Conclusion: CBCT has an important role in the diagnosis of oral and
maxillofacial pathologies with reduction in radiation dose. The information
obtained from the study highlighted the need for adapting to new technologies
like CBCT and regular continuing education programmes, post graduate
education courses, meetings and seminars are required to update dentists’
knowledge. The study also highlighted majority of participants believed CBCT
are the ultimate diagnostic tool in dentistry and research.
Keywords: CBCT; Knowledge; Attitude
Results
e present study used a questionnaire to gauge the level of
knowledge regarding CBCT among dental practitioners (Table 1). In
the present study, 41.5% were females, 8.4% were bachelors in dental
surgery 91.6% had a master’s degree and 58.5% were males, 16.2%
were bachelor in dental surgery and 83.8% had master’s degree (Table
2).
Among 200 dentists surveyed, 83.5% use digital radiography for
making radiographs and 16.5% did not use digital radiography for
making radiographs (Table 3).
100% felt the necessity of having CBCT in dental institutions
and 83.5% wished to use CBCT in their future professional career.
53.5% felt lower radiation dose compared to medical CT as the
main advantage which was in accordance with study conducted on
endodontists [8] by Yalcinkaya SE et al.38% felt data reconstruction
as the advantage (Table 3)
85.5% felt frequent CDES/ workshops should be conducted
to acquire more knowledge on CBCT which was in accordance to
Balabaskaran k et al [11]. 96% were willing to obtain any updated
Introduction
Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is an imaging modality that has recently
become useful for dento-maxillofacial imaging. When compared
with conventional CT scanners, CBCT units cost less and require less
space, have faster scan time, limit the beam to the head and neck with
reduction in the radiation doses and have interactive display modes
that oer maxillofacial imaging making them well suitable for use in
dental practices [1,2 ]. CBCT has wide applications in dentistry [3].
In view of the increasing availability of CBCT in dental practices and
the importance of dentist’s attitudes towards new technologies, this
survey assessed the knowledge and attitudes regarding CBCT among
dentists (practitioners and academicians) in and around Mangalore.
Material and Methods
A self administered questionnaire of 23 multiple choice questions
was given to 200 dentists working in reputed institutions in and
around Mangalore (Table 1). e questionnaire was given to the
participants who took approximately 20 minutes for completion.
Descriptive statistics was calculated in terms of frequencies and
percentages using the SPSS soware.
Research Article
Knowledge and Attitude of Dentists towards Cone Beam
Computed Tomography in Mangalore – A Questionnaire
Survey
Shishir Ram Shetty1*, Renita Lorina Castelino2,
Subhas G Babu2, Prasanna3, Anusha Rangare
Laxmana4 and Roopashri K5
1Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Gulf
medical University, United Arab Emirates
2Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Nitte
University, India
3Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Yenepoya
University, India
4Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Century
International Institute of Dental Sciences and Research
Centre, India
5Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, A J
Institute of Dental Sciences, India
*Corresponding author: Shishir Ram Shetty,
Department of Oral Medicine And Radiology, Gulf
medical university, Ajmaan, United Arab Emirates, Tel:
971556491740; Email: drshishirshetty@gmail.com
Received: February 24, 2015; Accepted: March 18,
2015; Published: March 20, 2015
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Questionnaire:
1) Gender:
a) Male b) female
2) Qualication:
a) BDS b) MDS (specify department).................................... c) Intern
3) Do you use digital imaging modalities to make radiographs?
a) yes b) no
4) Please specify your reasons to use digital imaging?
a) less radiation dose
b) short time
c) easy to store data
d) no developing required
e) adjustments and measurements can be made
f) Any other specify
5) Are you satised with the digital imaging modality available to you?
a) not at all b) a little c) no idea d) satised
6) Please check the reasons of not using digital imaging
a) expensive b) do not know how to use computer c) no idea d)hard to perform
7) Are you aware of CBCT in dental radiology?
a) Yes b) no
8) How did you come across the term CBCT
a) Seminars/workshops/CDE
b) Lessons by faculty
c) Internet
d) Seniors
e) Others (specify)
9) Do you feel CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool in dentistry
a) Yes b) no
10) Do you feel CBCT will be the ultimate tool in future dentistry and research?
a) Yes b) no
11) To what extent do you believe CBCT will be used in routine dental practice in the future?
a) It will not be used
b) In all specialties of dentistry
c) Limited use
d) Selected dental applications only
e) No idea
12) In which year of under graduate dental education should CBCT be included?
a) III BDS b) IV BDS C) post graduationost d) not required
13) Do you feel frequent CDE/workshop should be conducted to acquire more knowledge on CBCT?
a) Yes b) no c) maybe
14) Do you feel the necessity of having CBCT in the dental instituition?
a) Yes b) no
15) Would you like to use CBCT in your future professional career?
a) Yes b) no c) maybe d) no idea
16) What advantages do you feel will a CBCT offer over other diagnostic imaging modalities?
a) Lower radiation dose compared to medical CT
b) Short scanning time
c) Image processing easier due to limited beam
d) Less expensive
e) Data reconstruction can be performed on a personal computer
f) No idea
17) For what cases would you like to use CBCT in your future professional career?
a) Orthodontic assessment
b) Implant dentistry
c) Evaluation of cysts and tumors
d) Evaluation of impacted teeth
Table 1: Questionnaire used in the study.
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Gender Qualication Total
B M
F 7(8.4%) 76(91.6%) 83(41.5%)
M 19(16.2%) 98(83.8%) 117(58.5%)
Total 26(13.0%) 174(87.0%) 200(100.0%)
Table 2: Table showing gender (M/F) and qualication (B: Bachelor’s degree;
M: Master’s degree) of study subjects.
Yes No
Use digital imaging modalities to make
radiographs 167(83.5%) 33(16.5%)
Aware of CBCT in dental radiology 200(100.0%) 0
CBCT useful diagnostic tool 200(100.0%) 0
CBCT ultimate tool in future dentistry and
research 54(27.0%) 146(73.0%)
Necessity of having CBCT in dental institutions 200(100.0%) 0
Adequate teaching given at under graduate
students 153(76.5%) 47(23.5%)
Attended any courses related to CBCT 95(47.5%) 105(52.5%)
Advised CBCT for any diagnosis 82(41.0%) 118(59.0%)
Table 3: Showing opinion of the study subjects towards the necessity of CBCT.
Y N Maybe
Frequent CDES
should be
conducted 171(85.5%) 0 29(14.5%)
CBCT in future
career 167(83.5%) 033(16.5%)
Willingness to
obtain updated
information 192(96.0%) 08(4.0%)
Table 4: Showing response of the study subjects towards updating their
knowledge about CBCT.
41.5% felt CBCT will be used in selected dental specialties only. 52.5%
felt education regarding CBCT should be included in IV BDS, 41.5%
in post graduation (Table 5).
44.5% felt CBCT is useful in implant dentistrythe question
regarding teaching in dental schools 76.5% felt adequate teaching
was not given to the dental under graduate students regarding CBCT.
90% of the participants would prefer CBCT over CT for 3D imaging
of head and neck region (Table 6).
Discussion
e studies assessing dental practitioner’s knowledge about
dental radiology have focused mainly on digital systems and radiation
protection in the past. e literature includes one study that evaluates
the eectiveness of web-based instruction in the interpretation of
anatomy using CBCT images. Little information appears in the
literature regarding dental practitioner’s knowledge and attitudes
about CBCT [4-7]. e present study used a questionnaire to gauge
the level of knowledge regarding CBCT among dental practitioners.
Several studies have evaluated the popularity of digital imaging since
the adoption of digital radiology in dental oces. One study reported
that 14% of dental practitioners chose using digital radiography,
but subsequent studies reported a higher percentage [8]. e
questionnaire was developed with guidance of previous studies
[9,10]. Among 200 dentists surveyed, 83.5% use digital radiography
for making radiographs and 16.5% did not use digital radiography
for making radiographs. e reasons of not using digital imaging
were CBCT being expensive which was similar to the study done by
Yalcinkaya SE et al. [8]. 100% of the participants were aware of CBCT
in dental radiology similar to study done by Yalcinkaya SE et al. [8].
Majority of the participants came across the term CBCT through
seminars/workshops/CDE’S was in accordance to Balabaskaran k et
al. [11]. All of the participants felt CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool in
dentistry.in the present study, 96% were willing to obtain any updated
information on CBCT which was similar to study by Balabaskaran
k et al. [11]. In a similar study done by Brian and Williamson, no
developing process was stated as an most important factor to choose
digital imaging [8]. In our study less radiation dose was the most
important reason stated.
Conclusion
CBCT has an important role in the diagnosis of oral and
maxillofacial pathologies with reduction in radiation dose. e
e) Trauma cases
f) Any other(specify)
18) Is adequate teaching given to the dental under graduate students regarding CBCT by the faculty?
a) Yes b) no
19) Have you attended any courses related to CBCT?
a) Yes b) No
20) Are you willing to attend courses pertaining to CBCT?
a) Yes b) no c) maybe if within budget
21) Which one do you prefer when you need 3D imaging of head and neck region?
a) CT b)CBCT if available
22) Have you ever adviced CBCT for any diagnosis?
a) Yes b) no
23) Are you willing to obtain any updated information regarding CBCT?
a) Yes b)no c) maybe
information on CBCT.53.5% of the participants did not attend any
courses related to CBCT and 69% were willing to attend courses
pertaining to CBCT (Table 4).
e reasons to use digital imaging were as follows: 42.5% believed
less radiation dose, 23%-short time required to obtain images, 26%-
easy to store data, 22%-no developing required, 6.5%- adjustments and
measurements can be made. e reasons of not using digital imaging
were CBCT being expensive in 98.5%. 100% of the participants were
aware of CBCT in dental radiology 73.0% came across the term CBCT
through seminars/workshops/CDE’S .100% of the participants felt
CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool in dentistry. 27% felt CBCT will be
the ultimate tool in future dentistry and researchwhereas73% felt it
will not be the the ultimate tool. 42.5% believed CBCT will be used
in routine dental practice in the future in all specialties of dentistry,
Austin J Radiol 2(2): id1016 (2015) - Page - 04
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N(%)
Preference when3Dimaging required (Q21) CT 20(10.0%)
CBCT if available 180(90.0%)
Teaching of CBCT at under graduate level (Q12)
III BDS 16(8.0%)
IV BDS 105(52.5%)
PG 83(41.5%)
Advantages of CBCT over other modalities (Q16)
Lower radiation than CT 106(53.0%)
Short scan time 16(8.0%)
Processing easy 30(15.0%)
Less expensive 9(4.5%)
Data reconstruction can be performed 76(38.0%)
No idea 2(1.0%)
Cases to use CBCT (Q17)
Orthodontic Assessment 30(15.0%)
Implant dentistry 89(44.5%)
Evaluation of cysts and tumors 52(26.0%)
Evaluation of impacted teeth 47(23.5%)
Trauma cases 15(7.5%)
others 13(6.5%)
Table 6: Showing response of the study subjects towards applications of CBCT.
N(%)
Reason to use digital imaging
(Q4)
Less radiation dose 85(42.5%)
Short time 46(23.0%)
Easy to store data 52(26.0%)
No developing required 44(22.0%)
Adjustments and measurements can be made 13(6.5%)
Satised with digital modality available (Q5)
Not at all 11(5.5%)
Little 48(24.0%)
No idea 2(1%)
Satised 139(69.5%)
Reason for not using digital imaging(Q6)
Expensive 197(98.5%)
Do not know to use computer 1(0.5%)
No idea 2(1.0%)
The term CBCT came across (Q8)
Seminar/workshop/CDE 146(73.0%)
Lessons by faculty 24(12%)
Internet 15(7.5%)
Seniors 13(6.5%)
Others 20(10.0%)
To what extent CBCT will be used in routine practice
(Q11)
Will not be used 2(1.0%)
In all specialities 85(42.5%)
Limited use 29(14.5%)
Selected eld 83(41.5%)
No idea 1(0.5%)
Total 200(100%)
Table 5: Showing response of the study subjects towards digital imaging.
information obtained from the study highlighted the need for
adapting to new technologies like CBCT and regular continuing
education programmes, post graduate education courses, meetings
and seminars are required to update dentists’ knowledge. e study
also highlighted majority of participants believed CBCT is an useful
diagnostic tool in dentistry and research. e study also highlighted
that adequate teaching was not imparted regarding CBCT in
educational institutions but were willing to attend courses and
update knowledge on CBCT if provided with opportunities. Dental
practitioners should prescribe CBCT imaging only when they expect
that diagnostic yield will benet patient care, enhance patient safety
or improve clinical outcomes signicantly.
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Acknowledgement
e authors would like to thank Virgo Solutions for funding the
study.
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Citation: Shetty SR, Castelino RL, Babu SG, Prasanna, Laxmana AR and Roopashri K. Knowledge and Attitude
of Dentists towards Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Mangalore – A Questionnaire Survey. Austin J Radiol.
2015;2(2): 1016.
Austin J Radiol - Volume 2 Issue 2 - 2015
Submit your Manuscript | www.austinpublishinggroup.com
Shetty et al. © All rights are reserved
... The questionnaire was designed with the guidance of similar studies [7][8][9][10] and reviewed by five Endodontists, experts in using CBCT in Endodontic therapy. ...
... These findings are understandable given that CBCT has recently become an essential tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in different specialties of den-tistry worldwide. Similarly, several studies have been done to evaluate the knowledge and attitude towards digital radiography and CBCT among dental students 10) , general dentists [7][8][9]13,14) , and endodontists 15,16) . However, this is the first online survey to tackle these concepts among Iraqi dentists with different qualifications, including GDPs (142, 45.4%), dentists with postgraduate diplomas (25,8.2%), ...
... Although CBCT is a recent 3D imaging modality in Iraq, the current study concluded that 84% of participants were aware of the usage of CBCT in dentistry, which was a similar finding to a study by 7) and higher than in the studies by 9) and 18) who found that only 42.5% and 56% of their respondent dentists, respectively, had awareness about this field. Similarly, the level of this knowledge was very high (93.5%) ...
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Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of Iraqi dentists towards cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in endodontics by using an online survey. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire, consisting of 31 questions, targeted general dental practitioners and specialists in different dental specialities. A total of 306 participants were included. Data were assessed according to the frequency of distribution and the chi-square test was applied to analyse the difference in responses between two independent groups. Results: Among the participants, 63.4% were using digital radiography in their daily practice, and 84% had awareness about CBCT’s uses, with higher statistically significant responses among endodontists. About 51.4% of participants gained their CBCT knowledge from lectures, while 79.4% believed that continuous education courses enhance knowledge of CBCT. Nearly 75% of participants agreed on the accuracy of CBCT rather than periapical radiography in detecting endodontic conditions. However, most participants responded that CBCT would be used selectively in their future routine practice. Conclusions: This questionnaire showed that Iraqi dentists have a very good knowledge regarding indications and limitations of CBCT in endodontics. However, there is a lack of structured teaching and practical training on the use of CBCT within dental schools. The development of CBCT training programmes and increasing the availability of CBCT machines within dental schools are strongly supported by the results of this survey.
... Of these studies, four appear to have been well-conducted, 10,12,19 15 were moderately robust in their findings, 1,[13][14][15]18,21,23,24,26,27,29,39,41,45,46 and 12 had questionable evidence due to the low strength of their methodology. 16,17,20,22,28,[31][32][33][36][37][38]40,42,43,47 This review found that more than half of dental practitioners have an awareness of CBCT, with 63% to 97% of dentists reporting knowledge of the existence of the imaging technology. 12,13,23,24,26,27,39,46,44 An assessment of CBCT knowledge levels found that Iranian general dentists obtained a mean score-out-of-10 of 7.45, compared to 8.73 by specialists. ...
... Of these 30 papers, two were well-designed, 19, 35 15 were adequately conducted, 1,11,[13][14][15]18,21,[24][25][26][27]34,39,41,44 and 12 provided questionable evidence. 16,22,28,[31][32][33][36][37][38]40,42,43 Regarding practitioners' attitudes towards the role of CBCT in dentistry, this review found that 80% to 91.7% of respondents view CBCT as a valuable tool in enhancing diagnosis and treatment planning. 11,15,24 Similarly, it was found that 78.6% of undergraduate students, 14 90.9% of postgraduate students, 14 and 76.5% to 83% of dentists were satisfied or highly satisfied with CBCT. ...
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... Most of the house officers were satisfied with their work and they claimed that they follow protection protocols to their fullest. However, in future lectures, conference and related talks should be arranged so that new dentists who are willing to work in oral radiology department are familiar with the protection protocols 19 . Specifically, the senior doctors should monitor fresh house officers so that any mistake they make can be pointed out. ...
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... CBCT is an imaging modality that has recently become useful for dentomaxillofacial imaging. When compared with conventional CT scanners, CBCT units cost less, requires less space, have faster scan time, limit the beam to the head and neck with reduction in the radiation doses and have interactive display modes that offer maxillofacial imaging making them well suitable for use in dental practices [2] . CBCT systems function by concentrating a cone-shaped X-ray beam on a two dimensional (2D) detector that rotates 360° or less around the patient's head to produce a series of 2D images. ...
... The results of previous studies evaluating the competence of dentists, dentistry students, and orthodontists in education also demonstrated the inadequacy of dentistry education in this regard. [8][9][10]12 These results show that dental students should be provided more theoretical as well as practical information regarding CBCT. ...
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Objectives: The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dental practice has increased in recent years for various reasons, ranging from the lower radiation dose and fast scanning time to the fact that it provides detailed images with fewer artifacts compared to conventional tomography. Although CBCT is frequently preferred in orthodontics, orthognathic surgery, head trauma, and implant surgery, especially for the evaluation of the craniofacial region, its use is still limited in paediatric dentistry. The objective of this study is to evaluate knowledge and attitudes regarding the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) among paediatric dentists in Turkey. Materials and Methods: A self-administered anonymous questionnaire consisting of 17 questions was completed by 273 voluntary participants. Of these participants, 135 were postgraduate students in a paediatric dentistry program and 137 were PhDs or specialists. Relationships between categorical variables were evaluated using chi-square test. Results: 237 (86.8%) of 273 participants stated that they were knowledgeable about CT/CBCT. 81% of the responders expressed that the information they received during dental education was insufficient. When inter-variable dependency was assessed, the only significant relationship was between the participants’ self-rated knowledge about the use of CT and/or CBCT for the dentomaxillofacial region and the institutions in which they worked (P =.001). Conclusions: Although our results indicate that paediatric dentists have high levels of knowledge and positive attitudes towards digital imaging techniques and CBCT, it would be beneficial to update the dental curricula and enable dental students to gain practical experience in addition to theoretical knowledge. ÖZET Amaç: Konik ışınlı bilgisayarlı tomografilerin (KIBT) diş hekimliğinde kullanımı son yıllarda oldukça yayılmaktadır. KIBT; ortodontide, ortognatik cerrahide, kafa travmalarında ve implant cerrahisinde, kraniyofasiyal bölgenin değerlendirilmesinde oldukça sık kullanılsa da, pedodontide kullanımı halen sınırlıdır. Bu çalışmanın amacı, Türkiye’de pedodontistler arasında KIBT kullanımına yönelik bilgi ve tutumun değerlendirilmesidir. Gereç ve Yöntemler: Bu çalışma 273 gönüllü katılımcı ile gerçekleştirilmiş olup, katılımcılardan kendi kendine yönetilen ve 17 sorudan oluşan bir anketi isimsiz olarak doldurmaları istenmiştir. Katılımcıların 135’ini doktora/uzmanlık öğrencileri oluştururken, 137’si pedodonti doktoru ve/veya uzmanıdır. Bu araştırmada, kategorik değişkenler arası ilişkilerin incelenmesinde chi-kare testi kullanılmıştır. Bulgular: 237 (86.8%) katılımcı BT/KIBT hakkında bilgi sahibi olduğunu belirtmiştir. Katılımcıların %81’i diş hekimliği eğitimi sırasında aldıkları bilginin yetersiz olduğunu bildirmiştir. Değişkenler arası bağımlılık değerlendirildiğinde, anlamlı tek fark, katılımcıların BT/KIBT kullanımı konusunda bilgi sahibi olup olmadıklarına dair soru ile çalıştıkları kurum arasında bulunmuştur (P =.001). Sonuçlar: Çalışmamızın sonuçları, pedodontistlerin dijital görüntüleme yöntemleri ve KIBT kullanımına dair yüksek bilgiye sahip olduklarını ve olumlu tutum gösterdiklerini saptasa da, diş hekimliği müfredatının güncellenmesi ve öğrencilerin teorik bilginin yanı sıra pratik tecrübe edinmelerinin sağlanması, KIBT kullanımının yaygınlaşması ve yerinde kullanımının sağlanması açısından faydalı olacaktır.
... The plurality of this challenge is made evident when factors such as limited knowledge in operating and maintaining dental equipment, irregular power supply, and deficient manpower in the repair of these equipment. Moreover, the constant evolution of implant technology requires updated knowledge by both the clinician and laboratory technologist [38]. Frankly, this luxury may not be affordable to public hospital management and private practitioners who may prioritize other relatable daily expenses to cut cost and settle for the next best skill. ...
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Objective: This systematic review aims to examine the spectrum of research studies including cross-cultural and international studies that have focused on weight and health-related quality of life in children and adolescents. Methods: Following the PRISMA guidelines, studies published in the past 25 years from 1995 until 2020 that pertain to weight and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children and adolescents were identified through the use of Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and PsycInfo databases. Two authors independently conducted a focused analysis and reached a final consensus on which studies to include using specific selection criteria followed by a quality check of the studies, resulting in the final selection of 25 studies. Results: The selected studies particularized the level of impaired quality of life among normal-weight, overweight and obese children and adolescents, and distinctly found that higher participant weight was correlated with a lower HRQoL score. Conclusion: Studies showed a significant negative correlation between weight and HRQoL. Multiple types of prevention and treatment programs are critically needed to provide resources to improve quality of life in overweight and obese children and adolescents.
... and Reddy., et al. [6,7,10]. All the participants of the study were interested to attend hands on course on CBCT. ...
... The dentist's responses in our study clearly indicated, that education regarding digital radiography and advanced imaging modalities like CBCT must be provided to the present day dental fraternity for a better dentistry owing to its advantages over the conventional radiography. 16 Shetty et al. evidence the importance of CBCT in dentistry and proved that the imaging quality and details of tomographies is better than intra oral periapical or orthopantomogram whereas due to cost effectiveness of conventional dental radiography, the use of CT and CBCT scan has been subsided. ...
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The study was conducted to gauge the knowledge of dental practitioners regarding cone beam computed tomography. The research included 110 participants, among which were graduate and postgraduate practitioners. Participants were assessed about their knowledge, attitude and practice for cone beam computed tomography through a self-administered survey form upon which the study was based. The response rate was immense and there was a voluntary participation. Results were assessed and it was concluded that still a lot needs to be done to educate dental fraternity regarding CBCT as it is one of the newer developments in modern dentistry.
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Latar belakang: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) merupakan salah satu modalitas pencitraan radiologi 3 dimensi yang masih belum optimal digunakan di Indonesia, karena selain mahal harganya juga kemungkinan tingkat pengetahuan dokter gigi tentang CBCT masih kurang. Salah satu penyebab kurangnya pengetahuan bisa jadi karena CBCT tidak termasuk dalam Standar Kompetensi Dokter Gigi Indonesia (SKDGI) sehingga kemungkinan di beberapa Institusi Pendidikan Dokter Gigi (IPDG) tidak banyak diajarkan. Tujuan dilakukan penelitian ini adalah untuk melihat tingkat pengetahuan dokter gigi di Indonesia tentang CBCT. Metode: Desain penelitian deskriptif, data diperoleh menggunakan kuesioner yang ditujukan kepada responden, yaitu dokter gigi di Indonesia yang aktif berpraktik. Data yang didapat lalu diolah menggunakan perangkat lunak Microsoft Excel untuk mendapatkan persentase jawaban dari masing-masing pertanyaan dan disimpulkan apakah mayoritas responden memilih jawaban yang benar atau tidak. Hasil: Hasil menunjukkan pada pertanyaan dengan salah satu pilihan jawaban yang benar, mayoritas responden (lebih dari 50%) menjawab benar. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa tingkat pengetahuan dokter gigi di Indonesia sudah cukup baik, meskipun masih ada beberapa kekeliruan responden dalam pemahaman tentang CBCT. Kesimpulan: Pengetahuan dokter gigi di Indonesia tentang CBCT berdasarkan penelitian deskriptif sederhana menggunakan kuesioner, menunjukkan bahwa tingkat pengetahuannya sudah cukup baik. Akses informasi di era digital sekarang ini membuat dokter gigi dapat dengan mudahnya memperoleh pengetahuan di luar dari apa yang sudah didapat di pendidikan formal. Perlunya materi tambahan mengenai CBCT di kurikulum pendidikan dokter gigi atau memperbanyak materi tentang CBCT di kegiatan P3KGB dapat menjadi solusi.
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ntroduction: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is one of the imaging methods in radiography that makes the ability of precise and 3D imaging of maxillofacial possible. It occurs with the minimum level of distortion and shows a decrease of danger that comes from the ray. Accordingly, it is known as an essential way of performing an accurate treatment. Therefore, the dentist's knowledge and attitude on giving prescriptions, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of CBCT have gained high importance. This study aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitude of general dentists in Ilam about prescription cases, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the CBCT in 2018. Material & Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted on 50 general dentists in Ilam, Iran, during 2018. A questionnaire was used to investigate the dentist's knowledge level, and the obtained data were analyzed in SPSS software (version 22). (Ethic code: IR.MEDILAM.REC.1399.056) Findings: This study included 27 (54%) males and 23 (46%) females. The knowledge level about CBCT based on age and gender showed no statistical difference (P=0.23). Furthermore, regarding the relationship between the knowledge about CBCT and the work experience of the dentists, there was no significant difference in this regard (P=0.654). In addition, there was no significant difference between knowledge level about CBCT and participating in training courses (P=0.213). The maximum use of CBCT was for intraoral investigations. Moreover, the maximum cases of using CBCT was for extraoral investigations. The most important reason for not using CBCT was because of high cost (54%), and the most correct answers of the respondents were about knowledge and the application of CBCT in determining the position of the implants before surgery (96%). The knowledge of the general dentists was (47.884%) which was classified in a low group. Discussion & Conclusion: The findings from this study showed that the knowledge level of general dentists in Ilam about CBCT was nearly low, and the maximum level of the knowledge belonged to the experienced ones.
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Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Turkish endodontists toward digital radiological imaging (DRI) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty questionnaires were distributed. Questionnaires were given to a sample of endodontists and PhD students in endodontics who attended the 11 th International Congress of the Turkish Endodontic Society in Istanbul in 2012. Following the congress, the same questionnaires were sent electronically to endodontists who did not attend the congress. The participants were asked to answer 28 multiple-choice questions concerning their knowledge and practice regarding recent imaging techniques. The questions were subdivided into 2 main topics; general information; general approach to digital imaging. The statistical analysis was carried out by an χ2-test to compare the means at a significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The response rate for this study was 74%. The mean age of the endodontists who participated in this study was 32.74 ± 10.40 (range 22-61 years). Of the endodontists, 76.6% used digital imaging techniques (DUEs) in their clinics. Statistically significant differences were found between the DUEs and endodontists not using digital imaging (NDUEs), regarding age, gender, graduation year and place of employment ( P < 0.01). Endodontists 40-years-old and above had significantly lower knowledge of CBCT compared to the younger groups ( P = 0.001). Conclusions: The number of endodontists using digital imaging has been increasing in Turkey. The findings of the present study highlighted the need for adapting to new technologies via continuing education.
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The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equipment were also assessed. A total of 374 questionnaires were available for this study. 15% of the attendants used radiographic equipment that was more than 27 years old and 43% reported equipment that operated with a clockwork timer. 32% and 75% respectively had no idea what the kV or mA settings were on their intraoral equipment. 5% were unaware which cone geometry or geometric technique (paralleling or bisecting angle technique) they were using. 81% claimed to be using a short cone technique. 47% did not know what collimation meant, whereas 40% stated that they were using circular collimation. 38% used digital intraoral image detectors (63% were photostimulable storage phosphorplate (PSPP)), but 16% were not sure about the type of sensor they were using (PSPP or solid-state sensors). 61% also had dental panoramic equipment available, 25% of which was digital (10% charge coupled device (CCD) and 15% PSPP). These results clearly indicate the need for continued education on this subject. The latter is an important signal to Belgian authorities and dental professional societies.
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To evaluate the opinions of Norwegian dental practitioners regarding the use of solid state sensor and storage phosphor (SP) detectors for intra-oral radiography. A questionnaire received from 2199 dentists 309 (219 male, 86 female, four unknown) confirmed the use of digital radiography in their practices. Sixty-one per cent of dentists used a SP and 35% a sensor system; four (1.3%) used both. Approximately 50% of dentists had experienced technical problems and 33% had needed repairs. Almost all dentists stored their images on the hard disk (>97%) and 81% made a daily back-up. More sensor than SP users found difficulty with the positioning holder. Two-thirds of dentists reported digital image quality was the same or better than film. More Digora (Soredex, Helsinki, Finland) users reported better image quality than Denoptix (Gendex, Milan, Italy) or Digident (Digident, Nesher, Israel) users. Mean reduction in exposure time was 55% (range 2-90%), although 17 dentists stated that no reduction was achieved. Approximately half of the sensor users also used film and 38% of the SP users. Film was used more often for bitewing examination by the sensor users (27%) than by the SP users (4%). Mean time saved by the sensor users was 36 min/day (range 10-120) and by the SP users 25 min/day (range 5-120). The majority of dentists felt that digital image quality was the same or better than film and exposure and examination times were reduced. However, technical problems and repairs were common.
Article
Objectives: The present study was carried out to assess the awareness and knowledge of CBCT among practicing general dentists. Materials and methods: A 13 multiple choice questionnaire was given to practicing general dentists to answer. A total of 50 dentists participated in the survey (21 females and 29 males). Results: Among 50 dentists, about 82% (n=41) are aware of cone beam computed tomography used for dentomaxillofacial region and 18% (n=9) are not aware of cone beam computed tomography used for dentomaxillofacial region. out of 41 dentists about 48% got to know about CBCT through lectures and class , 12% through internet, 9.7% through journal, 17% through seminars, 7.3% during PG, 2.4% during trauma case referral and 2.4% through advertisement. Among 41 dentists about 39% attended workshops regarding CBCT and 61% did not attend any workshops. About 80.48% felt that lower radiation is the most advantage of CBCT over CT. About 87.8% answered that CBCT offers enhanced diagnosis at lower dose than CT and 7.32% contradicted this and 4.88% have no idea. About 14.63% felt that less radiation is the primary difference between CT and CBCT, 14.63% felt shape of the beam, 2.44% cost, and 2.44% quality and precision and 65.85% have no idea. About 70.73% reported that the radiation risk from CBCT is generally higher than conventional CT scans, 9.76% contradicted this and 19.51% have no idea. About 68.29% have referred their patients for CBCT while 31.71% have not referred. 2.44% guessed the cost to be less than Rs 500, 26.83% between Rs 500 – 1000, 17.07% above Rs. 1000 and 53.66% having no idea. About 48.78% reported they would choose CBCT for implant, 35% for implant and evaluation of cyst and tumors, 19.51% for all the mentioned cases. About 43.90% believed that CBCT would be used in the near future in all areas of dentistry, 7.32% believed that it will not be commonly used in routine practice and 12.2% have no idea. 39.02% thought that it is necessary for CBCT to be available at their speciality,56.1% did not think as necessary and 4.88% have no idea. Majority of the participants thought that clinical phase should include lectures on CBCT, 14.63% and 17.07% on pre clinical and doctoral phase respectively. Majority of the participants about 95.12% are satisfied with the use of CBCT while 4.88% are not satisfied. Conclusion: the present study shows better awareness of CBCT among dental practitioners and this study suggests that more knowledge should be gained on this emerging new technology for better diagnosis and treatment planning
Article
PurposeTo establish the level of implementation of recommendations from the National Radiological Protection Board, relating to best radiation protection practice in dental radiography within general dental practices in the North-east of England. To survey the opinion of practitioners on the availability of related post-graduate courses in the region.MethodsA postal survey in the form of a self-reported questionnaire was mailed to all practices in the North-east of England in November 2000. The questionnaire, consisting of closed and open-ended questions, was to be completed where possible by the resident radiation protection supervisor.ResultsTwo hundred and sixteen practices responded to the questionnaire, a response rate of 53%. The survey revealed variation in the standards of application of best radiation protection practice. Some 23% of practitioners had not attended any post-graduate courses on radiation protection since qualifying. Post-graduate education provision on radiation protection in the region was considered insufficient by 51% of respondents.ConclusionsIt is concluded that a significant proportion of practices were not making full use of opportunities to reduce dose to their patients. In addition, a small number of practices had untrained staff acting as the Radiation Protection Supervisor. A significant proportion of practitioners had not been updated in radiation protection practices within a 5-year period, and this may account for the failure to implement best radiographic practice. Over half felt that there was insufficient availability of post-graduate courses in radiation protection. The regional provision of continuing professional education in this field may need development.
Article
Cone-beam imaging has gained broad acceptance in dentistry in the last 5 years. The purpose of this review is to describe the use in dentistry and consider issues requiring further development. Cone-beam machines emit an x-ray beam shaped liked a cone rather than a fan as in conventional computed tomography (CT) machines. After this beam passes through the patient the remnant beam is captured on an amorphous silicon flat panel or image intensifier/charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. The beam diameter ranges from 4 to 30 cm and exposes the head in one pass around the patient capturing from 160 to 599 basis images. These images are used to compute a volume from which planar or curved reconstructions can be extracted in any orientation. Voxels are isotropic and can be as small as 0.125 mm. 3-D images of bone or soft tissue surfaces can also be generated. In dentistry the most common indications for cone-beam imaging are assessment of the jaws for placement of dental implants, evaluation of the temporomandibular joints for osseous degenerative changes, examination of teeth and facial structures for orthodontic treatment planning, evaluation of the proximity of lower wisdom teeth to the mandibular nerve prior to extraction, and evaluation of teeth and bone for signs of infections, cysts, or tumors. Cone-beam images have largely replaced conventional tomography for these tasks. The effective dose from cone-beam imaging ranges from 6 to 477 microSv. The cost of the equipment is relatively low, about $150,000 to $300,000. Issues to be considered are the training of individuals making and interpreting cone-beam images, as well as means to further reduce patient exposure.
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This article on x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition provides an overview of the fundamental principles of operation of this technology and the influence of geometric and software parameters on image quality and patient radiation dose. Advantages of the CBCT system and a summary of the uses and limitations of the images produced are discussed. All current generations of CBCT systems provide useful diagnostic images. Future enhancements most likely will be directed toward reducing scan time; providing multimodal imaging; improving image fidelity, including soft tissue contrast; and incorporating task-specific protocols to minimize patient dose.
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The aim of this study was to evaluate students' attitudes towards digital radiography and measurement accuracy in digital images recorded with a CCD-sensor and a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate radiography system in connection with root canal treatment. Thirty-one dental students participated in an endodontic course. Two single-rooted teeth were assigned at random to two receptors for digital radiographic examination, either (i) the RVG-ui CCD sensor or (ii) the Digora PSP plate system. After the endodontic treatment had been completed for the first tooth, the student filled in a questionnaire on their use of the digital system. Thereafter, the students switched radiography system and repeated the procedure for the second tooth. Eventually, the students completed the questionnaire by answering questions that directly compared the two digital systems. The gutta-percha filled tooth was measured using the system's own software. Two measurements of each tooth were performed: total tooth length (TTL) and root filling length (RFL). The teeth were dismounted from the plaster blocks and the true TTL and RFL was measured with an electronic slide calliper. The majority of the students had used the contrast enhancement facility (CCD sensor = 52%, PSP = 71%) and the zoom facility (65-68%) whilst some had used the density enhancement facility (CCD sensor = 39%, PSP = 55%). The students stated that they saved more time when they used the CCD sensor than when they used the PSP system (P < 0.001), and that it was easier to position the tooth with the PSP plate than with the sensor (P < 0.01). The lengths measured on the digital images from both digital systems were marginally larger than the true tooth lengths (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference between the two digital systems for the TTL/RFL ratio (P > 0.05).
Article
To perform a survey of private dental offices in Belgium and gain insight in the knowledge and attitude of Belgian dentists towards quality care in radiography and radiation protection. A questionnaire was distributed among 700 Belgian dental offices, which were included based on demographic data and the use of intraoral radiographic equipment. The response rate was 71%. Implementation of standards for quality care and radiation protection was suboptimal. In most offices, exposure settings of the intraoral radiation tube were 65 kV/kVp to 70 kV/kVp and 10 mA to 12 mA, with an average exposure time of 0.45 s. No reduction of exposure time was noticed when using faster film types. About one-third of the responders worked with digital image receptors. Aiming devices and rectangular collimation were used in a minority of practices (40% and 6%, respectively). The distance of the dentist to the radiation tube during exposure was on average 2.2 m, although 8% of the dentists assisted in holding the image receptor inside the patient's mouth. One quarter of the dentists were standing behind a wall when taking radiographs. Lead aprons were worn more often by female dentists. Dose estimation revealed that male dentists received a significantly larger effective dose per year than female dentists (8.3 mSv vs 3.2 mSv). The implementation of standards of quality care for radiography and radiation protection could be improved among Belgian dentists. An elaborate educational programme in dental radiography is a prerequisite. Furthermore, recommendations could help to attain a change in attitude towards the use of ionizing radiation in order to meet European guidelines.
Article
The aim of this study was to determine the dentist's knowledge about dose reduction techniques, radiographic equipment and quality of dental radiographic service in general dental practice in Turkey. The survey was performed on 636 dentists who attended the 11th International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. Information on the demographic characteristics of the dentists, radiographic equipment, techniques and processing they used and radiation protection was obtained with a 32 point questionnaire. The respondents' knowledge concerning the technical details of their equipment was limited, with 512 (86.9%) not knowing the kilovoltage peak (kVp) of their machine. Only 34 (5.5%) respondents reported having rectangular collimators. The dentists had little knowledge about the speed of film they used. D-speed film was the most preferred one with 21.6%. Fifty-eight (10.2%) dentists used E-speed film and the F-speed film was used only by 13 (2.3%) dentists. The most preferred technique (62%) for periapical radiography was the bisecting angle technique. Four hundred and eighty five (82.5%) of the dentists reported that they took the radiographs by themselves. In the present study, the results indicate that for minimizing any unnecessary radiation, attempts should be made to improve dentists' knowledge about radiation dose reduction techniques.