Book

Third Place Learning Reflective Inquiry into Intercultural and Global Cage Painting

Authors:

Abstract

The hybridity and dynamism of today’s interconnected, interdependent and culturally diverse world poses challenges and opportunities for learning and communication. This book introduces an approach to facilitate global learning opportunities, while facing these challenges. The approach is based on the cage painting metaphor for dialogic co-construction of meaning, and understanding of multiple perspectives. Resolving disorienting dilemmas or preconceptions requires a dialectic flow of thinking since the root of the problem may lay deep in person’s beliefs and values. Such experiences might be transformative in their nature, causing change in person’s perspective; better understanding the culture of themselves and other people; reflective and mindful inquiry into one’s worldview; the third place processes. Misunderstandings are more prevalent when using technology—global reach—between people from distant locations different cultures. To prepare people for these challenges, we offer a Web 2.0-based instructional design blueprint. Dependent on the context and content of the planned activities, the cage painting and global learning processes may be facilitated simultaneously or sequentially. The approach presented in this book has attracted interest of educators in different disciplines as well as human resources leaders concerned with key characteristics of today’s global business workers: intercultural/global communication and collaboration. The ideas emerged from six years of studying ways in which we and our colleagues from 25 other countries integrated global learning into classrooms in a range of discipline areas. In this book we explore the competences needed to communicate interculturally and avoid the effects of preconceptions on our communication and collaboration. We review metaphors commonly used in intercultural communication and then introduce a new metaphor called "Cage Painting". The process of Cage Painting requires certain conditions during intercultural communication, whether it is face-to-face or via global reach, using technology. The transformative processes that we undergo as we confront cultural disorienting dilemmas, smiling being a simple example of one, are named the Third Place. CONTENTS Acknowledgments. Abstract. Foreword, J. Michael Adams and Angelo Carfagna. Preface. Introduction. 1. Intercultural and Global Communication Competencies. 2. Cage Painting Learning Environment. 3. Third Place Processes: Theotetical Framing. 4. Global Learning Models and Emerging Blurprint. 5. Conclusion: Further Reflective Inquiry Into the Third Place Processes. References. About the Authors. Index.
... Four common metaphors in the area of intercultural training, along with a relatively new metaphor, are included in the discussion for the purposes of communicating contextual clarity about their usefulness in simulations created to improve intercultural literacy. The iceberg metaphor is perhaps the most commonly used to visually express the difference between surface and deep culture (Rimmington & Alagic, 2008). The iceberg portion above the water symbolizes surface culture; deep culture is the part of the iceberg concealed by water. ...
... The cage metaphor is a relatively new addition to metaphors that clarify the abstractness of intercultural nuances. It implies a dialogic framing of perception and meaning (Rimmington & Alagic, 2008). The adoption of multifaceted (as opposed to limited) perspectives is contingent on the realization of one's own cultural constraints and how they affect perception. ...
... Recalling the cage metaphor, third place thinking refers to thinking in terms of the ability to observe one's own cage, or interpretive frame for understanding real-world input, while observing another's cage (Rimmington & Alagic, 2008). The third place is essentially that space which emerges from successful communication of two or more viewpoints between interlocutors representing different cultural perspectives. ...
Article
The growing need for intercultural literacy in an increasingly interconnected and computer-mediated world contrasts with the dearth of investigation in best practices when designing simulations aimed at improving intercultural communication. Synthetic cultures inspired by real-world cultural traits, problem-based learning, and a social constructivist theoretical base represent core components of immersive learning environments designed to improve intercultural literacy. Through an analysis of the literature, a model is proposed primarily to promote discussion and debate about intercultural simulations. The Model for Intercultural Communication in Simulations asserts that along with those components, the Experiential Learning Cycle (ELC), natural decision making, and third place thinking form an approach in understanding how intercultural simulations should be designed. The Model for Intercultural Communication in Simulations challenges the learner to move beyond known paradigms and encourages simulation and e-learning designers to employ socially situated contexts. Accordingly, within the context of the model, a culminating evaluation of an online intercultural training simulation (ARGONAUTONLINE) follows the introduction of the model.
... The ThirdPlaceLearning (TPL) theory [18] of InterCulturalCommunication (ICC) describes the liminal phase between the interlocutors' perspectives. In contrast with othercross-cultural or trans-cultural theories of ICC, TPL views ICC interaction from a ―third‖ vantage point. ...
... This is achieved through developing an understanding of each other's perspective and thus a better understanding of each interlocutor's own perspective , through Perspective Sharing and Perspective Taking(PSPT). This latter process is facilitated by a set of processes and conditions, we call the TPL relational criteria, [1], [2], [3], [18] as depicted in Figure 1 . In this paper we describe how Cognitive Linguistics (CL) methods [9], [14], [7] were applied to analyze the TPL concepts and terminology. ...
... TPL Thesaurus. To investigate the TPL theoretical framework [18] based on the CL methods, we first constructed an English languagethesaurus of TPL terms and definitions . Where we used a word specific to the TPL framework, we defined it in the thesaurus using the ISO 704 standards [11]. ...
... Intercultural learning processes with young people should be based on their reality. Education of the youth in this regard should present contradictory tendencies/realities and help them to integrate toward an honest intercultural dialogue (Council of Europe and European Commission, 2000;Rimmington & Alagic, 2008). ...
... The new immigrant students have crossed political and cultural borders and they need, as other students do, for teachers to meet them halfway on that journey, to help bridge that distance that must be traveled. Awareness of the loss or grief and the resultant emotions that surface or remain just below the surface are becoming known more and more in intercultural conversations about a third space (Bhabha, 1994;Rimmington & Alagic, 2009;Rutherford, 1990;Van Reken & Pollock, 2009). In our modern, mobile world, this kind of understanding will become more common as people live in multiple cultures or countries and are children of mixed ethnicities, cultures, and worldviews. ...
... Through a critical multicultural conceptual model, this paper provides an analysis on broadening participation and increasing the STEM pipeline within the doctoral level for students who are often marginalized (McDowell and Fang, 2007). We maintain that a critical multiculturalist model addresses power dynamics (Rimmington and Alagic, 2008) and approaches this topic from the vantage point of supporting racial, ethnic, gender and cultural equity within STEM (Banks, 2006). Definitions of the scope of multiculturalism vary among scholars (Steinber and Kincheloe, 2001), but for this paper, multiculturalism encompasses gender and race. ...
Article
Purpose: For several decades, human and financial resources have been the focus of academic institutions in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics fields of study because of low matriculation and graduation involving diverse student populations. However, there is a paucity of research about pathways to doctoral-level education and completion for these underrepresented populations. The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptually how STEM doctoral programs can implement a critical multiculturalist framework to recruit, increase persistence and completion to abate the attrition rate of women and students of color in doctoral programs. Design/methodology/approach: Through a critical multiculturalist framework, issues of access and attainment central to the pipeline of traditionally underrepresented populations in to the STEM fields are addressed in this paper in an effort to support equity and inclusion at the doctoral level. Approaching this issue through critical multiculturalism takes the issue of access and attainment beyond sheer numbers by addressing the limited opportunity of women and students of color to see themselves in graduate faculty within STEM. Findings: This paper reviews literature regarding the STEM pipeline’s “glass ceiling” that exists at the graduate level for students from marginalized communities, including gender and race. This paper proposes a multicultural doctoral persistence model. Originality/value: Despite the efforts of many institutions of higher education to diversify the STEM fields, a “glass ceiling” remains at the doctoral level. There appears to be a pipeline for women and minorities from K-12 to the undergraduate level, but the doctoral level has been largely left out of the conversation.
Chapter
In this chapter, we consider the stakeholder approach to proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR), which hinges on company executives and managers absorbing diverse stakeholder perspectives and vice versa, so that communication and decision-making can be meaningful. The ThirdPlaceLearning (TPL) framework, with associated relational criteria, facilitates systematically learning and absorbing the diversity of stakeholder perspectives. Application of TPL in this way represents a paradigm shift toward absorbing stakeholder and contextual complexity. This paradigm shift underpins complexification of business structures and processes, skillful management of diversity, and improvement of financial performance, as well as ensuring social and environmental sustainability. Together, these attributes can help businesses nurture proactive CSR, which in turn can help successfully avoid or respond to crises.
Chapter
Im Zuge von unternehmerischen Internationalisierungsstrategien und durch die angestiegene Mobilität der arbeitenden bzw. nach Arbeit und Einkommen suchenden Menschen über Landesgrenzen hinweg gewinnt Diversity und hier insbesondere die kulturelle Vielfalt an Bedeutung für Unternehmen und Gesellschaft, aber auch für die Menschen, die im tagtäglichen Arbeitsleben mit kulturellen Überschneidungssituationen umgehen (müssen). Mein Beitrag nähert sich der Thematik über drei zentrale Fragestellungen: Wie lässt sich kulturelle Vielfalt im Feld der Diversity und des DiM verorten? Wie kann kulturelle Vielfalt empirisch erfasst und adäquat interpretiert werden? Wie kann interkulturelle Intelligenz gefördert und mit DiM verquickt werden? Um diese Fragen zu beantworten, werde ich zunächst Diversity und DiM inhaltlich fassen und kulturelle Vielfalt in diesem Rahmen verorten. Danach werde ich zwei Ansätze vorstellen, mit denen kulturelle Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten erfasst und verständlich gemacht werden können. Dennoch sollten die Versuche, kulturelle Vielfalt zu messen und bestimmte Charakteristika als landes- oder gesellschaftstypisch zu interpretieren, kritisch diskutiert werden. Das tue ich im vierten Abschnitt dieses Beitrages, um mich abschließend den Möglichkeiten zuzuwenden, interkulturelle Kompetenz zu erwerben und diese Prozesse mit DiM zu verquicken.
Chapter
Im Zuge von unternehmerischen Internationalisierungsstrategien und durch die angestiegene Mobilität der arbeitenden bzw. nach Arbeit und Einkommen suchenden Menschen über Landesgrenzen hinweg gewinnt Diversity und hier insbesondere die kulturelle Vielfalt an Bedeutung für Unternehmen und Gesellschaft, aber auch für die Menschen, die im tagtäglichen Arbeitsleben mit kulturellen Überschneidungssituationen umgehen (müssen). Mein Beitrag nähert sich der Thematik über drei zentrale Fragestellungen: Wie lässt sich kulturelle Vielfalt im Feld der Diversity und des DiM verorten? Wie kann kulturelle Vielfalt empirisch erfasst und adäquat interpretiert werden? Wie kann interkulturelle Intelligenz gefördert und mit DiM verquickt werden? Um diese Fragen zu beantworten, werde ich zunächst Diversity und DiM inhaltlich fassen und kulturelle Vielfalt in diesem Rahmen verorten. Danach werde ich zwei Ansätze vorstellen, mit denen kulturelle Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten erfasst und verständlich gemacht werden können. Dennoch sollten die Versuche, kulturelle Vielfalt zu messen und bestimmte Charakteristika als landes- oder gesellschaftstypisch zu interpretieren, kritisch diskutiert werden. Das tue ich im vierten Abschnitt dieses Beitrages, um mich abschließend den Möglichkeiten zuzuwenden, interkulturelle Kompetenz zu erwerben und diese Prozesse mit DiM zu verquicken.
Article
This paper discusses a curriculum developed to make innovative use of collaborative digital technologies—including video conferences, collaborative blogs, writing on a Wiki, and dynamic chat—as part of an activity-based research project to foster intercultural competencies among students in globally-distributed teams. We present qualitative and quantitative data that indicate successful implementation of the curriculum for facilitating global learning via communication technology tools. By situating the curriculum within current debates in intercultural communication and digital pedagogy, we hope to offer new knowledge on how best to foster multiple perspectives through developing intercultural capital that enables world citizenship. We conclude with a projection on the scalability and sustainability of the curriculum in an international context and an argument for how such cross-cultural connections can foster greater political understanding, ethical awareness, and intercultural competencies in order to bring about improved international and social relations for emerging global citizens.
Article
Full-text available
The interconnectedness of the world because of the Internet and the interdependence due to trade liberalization have given rise to the need for future graduates to be more intercul-turally and globally competent communicators. Such competence can be improved through a process of Cage Painting, in which participants learn more about the effects of back-ground, experience, and context on their perspectives. The effects of somatic-emotional states of the interactants on Cage Painting are considered for the first time in this paper. This emerged from Mindful Inquiry into Cage Painting simulation workshops over a 4-year period. This paper describes how Mindful Inquiry informed the integration of bodymind-fulness into Cage Painting. Although significant additional efforts will be needed to refine and apply this integration into Cage Painting, we expect our work to promote transforma-tive learning by emphasizing both the rational and extrarational aspects of developing in-tercultural communication competence. We also hope that this collaborative work will in-spire others to elaborate, extend, evaluate, and even transform certain aspects of Body-mindful Cage Painting so that we all and those that learn with us can work toward broader understandings and coexistence in today's challenging world.
The Association of American Geographers' Center for Global Geography Education (CGGE) offers online learning modules that support international collaborations in post-secondary geography with the aim of promoting international dialogue on relevant geographic issues. Through the module's collaborative learning activities, students have an opportunity to develop intercultural communication competence, broaden their international perspectives and build a sense of global citizenship. This paper explores ways to design effective online collaborative activities in general as well as methods to evaluate the impact of the CGGE modules on students' international perspectives.
Chapter
Current Paradigmatic ApproachesBeyond the ParadigmsA Dialectical Approach to Studying Intercultural InteractionCurrent Dialectical ResearchA Rationale for Supporting the Fluidity and Complexity of Culture/CommunicationA Methodological Strategy for Studying Culture and Communication PhenomenaThe Six Dialectics as a Framework for Studying Intercultural CommunicationThe Six Dialectics as a Framework for Teaching Intercultural CommunicationFuture of the Dialectical PerspectiveReferences
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.