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... agencies in Ontario revealed similar problems resulting from funding cutbacks and overwork (Baines et al. 2002). A community care worker in Britain told Jones (2001, 554): ...
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Capital accumulation is the essence of production in capitalist society. Consequently, corporations are constantly driven and workers exhorted to increase productivity in the interest of raising profits. Economic slumps and recessions are used as reasons to argue that there is a productivity crisis and push for increasing productivity at the expense of wages, benefits and social programming, as we see with the post-2007 Great Recession. This essay discusses these trends, theoretical and ideological arguments, and the need for a socialist alternative to the never-ending push to increase productivity for capital accumulation at the expense of workers’ rights and social welfare. L’accumulation du capital est l’essence de la production dans les sociétés capitalistes. En conséquence, les entreprises sont constamment obligées et les ouvriers constamment exhortés à augmenter leur productivité dans le but d’augmenter les profits. Les ralentissements de l’économie et les récessions sont utilisés pour justifier l’argument qu’il y a une crise de productivité et pour pousser pour plus de productivité aux dépens des salaires et des avantages associés et des programmes sociaux, comme nous le voyons avec la Grande Récession depuis 2007. Cet article analyse ces tendances, les arguments théoriques et idéologiques, et le besoin d’une alternative socialiste à la pression sans cesse renouvelée à l’augmentation de la productivité pour favoriser l’accumulation du capital aux dépens des droits des travailleurs et des droits sociales.
... Objectives included better equipping social workers for self-care; improved peer support and supervision; changes in workplace policies, practices and conditions that would attract and retain social workers, improved workload, salaries and benefits; and promotion of labour mobility form one area of the country to another. While some attention has been paid to these issues by Canadian social work scholars recently ( Baines et al., 2002;Kenyon, 1997;Regehr, Leslie, Howe, & Chau, 2000;, little attention has been paid to these issues in social work curricula over the years. These issues have generally been understood to be within the purview of the professional associations and unions, and this understanding was reinforced in the Sector Study, with leadership for all actions except increased curriculum content on self-care being assigned to professional bodies ( Stephenson et al., 2001, 209 ...
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The history of social work education in Canada can be characterized as a debate about the mission of social work practice between two perspectives: the "professional" (or function) and the "progressive" (or cause) one. This paper briefly outlines the history of social work education in Canada, describes the current delivery structure of social work education, and summarizes the responsibilities of the various standard-setting bodies. It then discusses the issues identified through a recent planning process in the context of the larger debate about the mission of social work. RESUMEN La historia del trabajo social en el Canadá puede caracterizarse como un debate entre dos perspectivas, una que da énfasis a la función del trabajo social y otra que se enfoca mas en las razones de su existencia. Este articulo ofrece una sinopsis de la historia de la educación del trabajo social en el Canadá, describe la presente estructura y las responsabilidades de los diferentes cuerpos que establecen los estándares corrientes. Finalmente, describe puntos de debate identificados a través de un proceso de planeamiento en el contexto de una amplia
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Non-profit organisations are important mechanisms for the delivery of many social and health services, as well as places where people work. In Canada, 1.3 million people do paid work in non-profit organisations, and many more are involved in a voluntary capacity. However, occupational safety and health systems, originally set up in response to the hazards of factory-based work, may not adequately protect those working in NPOs. In this paper, I argue that workers delivering social and health services in Canadian non-profit organisations can face a number of work-related hazards, including exposure to infectious disease, secondhand smoke, violence and stress. My examination of provincial legislation that was designed to protect the health of workers and provide compensation when workers have been injured at work found that, at times, it is not well-suited to workers in non-profit organisations or to the organisational configurations (eg mixing paid and voluntary labour) found in this sector. I examine these legislative gaps and discuss the implications they can have for workers' health in this growing sector.
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Challenges from employers and governments and the limited success of public sector union responses suggest the need for renewal in Canadian public sector unions. This article engages with discussions of union renewal by way of theoretically conceptualizing the modes of union praxis relevant to Canadian unions. It then examines the nature of neoliberal public sector reform and assesses the experiences of Canadian public sector unions under neoliberalism. In this difficult context, unions that are able to make progress in the interconnected development of greater democracy and power will be more capable of channelling workers’ concerns into union activity. This, along with international and Canadian evidence, highlights the significance of the praxis of social movement unionism to union renewal in the public sector
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There is little known about occupational health and safety concerns or programs in workplaces in the inner city. This work was part of a needs assessment for development of occupational health and safety programs for workplaces in the inner city. Its key objective was to identify inner-city worker concerns regarding specific hazards. The work involved two phases. The first sampled workers in an inner-city hospital and church, and the second involved both paid and volunteer workers in inner-city community outreach programs. The key concerns raised by inner-city workers were infectious disease and personal safety and violence. Occupational health and safety programs need to address infectious disease and personal safety issues in this environment. Further research is needed regarding workplace health and safety in inner-city workplaces, both regarding hazards particular to the inner city and occupational health programs for the workers, both paid and volunteer, who work there.
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The present paper reviews and summarises the research and literature on the nature and causes of bullying at work. Bullying occurs when someone at work is systematically subjected to aggressive behaviour from one or more colleagues or superiors over a long period of time, in a situation where the target finds it difficult to defend him or herself or to escape the situation. Such treatment tends to stigmatise the target and may even cause severe psychological trauma. Empirical studies on the causes of bullying have concentrated on the personality of the victim and psychosocial factors at work. Most studies treat bullying as a unified phenomenon, in spite of the fact that different kinds of behaviours are involved. The concepts of dispute-related and predatory bullying are introduced in an effort to broaden the perspectives used in future investigations on both the nature and the causes of bullying at work.
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This article analyses the relationship between mobbing, job characteristics, social environment variables, and psychological ill-health. The Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terrorization (LIFT) was factor analysed and led to seven factors in two samples of mobbing victims (N = 50 and N = 99): Mobbing by organizational measures, social isolation, attacking the victim's private life, attacking the victim's attitudes, physical violence, verbal aggression, and rumours. Mobbing was correlated with bad job content, a bad social environment, and psychological ill-health. The findings suggest that the more social support supervisors gave, the less the victims reported being shouted at, being constantly criticized, and receiving verbal threats. In contrast, the more social support the victims received from their colleagues the less they reported being socially isolated or being ridiculed with regard to their private life. Moreover, having private life attacked showed the strongest correlation with psychological ill-health. The data suggest that organizational factors are potential causes of mobbing at work.
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The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between mobbing at work and the well-being of the affected person, and to explore possible organizational effects of mobbing in connection with coping behaviour. The article reports data from two studies carried out in Austria (368 health professionals) and Germany (10 in-patients) between 1993 and 1994. The results support other findings that mobbing has a negative impact on the well-being of the affected person. Moreover, the results indicate that employees do not cope with mobbing by using simple flight or fight reactions (e.g. absenteeism, lower level of productivity). The results suggest that it should be possible to identify mobbing in an early stage, which, in turn, should enhance the prevention of mobbing.