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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the Athenian views of music and music education as these are presented in the works of the ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle and to suggest ways in which the issues raised by them are still relevant for music education today. Their philosophical and practical views on music education, apart from being an excellent and very up-to-date source for advocacy, can also initiate thoughts and promote solutions on problems that still remain unsolved. During the study, of their works, the reader surprisingly realizes that these philosophers had stated 2,500 years ago what the music education community has, just recently, come to realize concerning the value of music education, children's musical development, and instructional strategies in music.
... Aristotle proposed that music could imitate emotion and character of humans, such as gentleness, happiness, anger, sadness and braveness [6]. Both Aristotle and Plato considered that exquisite music could make people graceful [19]. When people listen to and imitate music with various emotional expressions, they may be filled with emotions of the same nature; if and when exposed for a long time to music of base emotions, the receivers' disposition might be influenced that way [19]. ...
... Both Aristotle and Plato considered that exquisite music could make people graceful [19]. When people listen to and imitate music with various emotional expressions, they may be filled with emotions of the same nature; if and when exposed for a long time to music of base emotions, the receivers' disposition might be influenced that way [19]. ...
... Além de imitar emoções, Aristóteles dizia que a música tem também outras importantes finalidades, tais como: gerar prazer; inspirar virtudes e proporcionar satisfação intelectual. [3,4] Um pouco mais adiante, no final do século 4 AC, Aristóxeno de Tarento, que foi tanto instruído na escola pitagórica quanto aluno de Aristóteles, uniu os aspectos das suas bases de formação e desenvolveu uma análise musical própria, onde a percepção humana passa a ser fundamental e indispensável. Aristóxeno acreditava que a música era, ao mesmo tempo, ciência e arte, e que assim o julgamento das estruturas musicais deveria ser feito através de uma análise empírica, ou seja, por meio da audição, e não apenas através de proporções matemáticas, conforme havia sido sugerido por Pitágoras. ...
... Egaña 1811: 17. 16 Jaeger 2010 Marrou 1985: 9;Stamou 2002: 5. 17 Stamou 2002 Woerther 2008: 90. ...
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This article analyzes the role and the value that the intellectual Juan Egaña Risco (1769-1836) recognized to music in his educational essays and curricular proposals, in the context of the independence of Chile and the configuration of its republican system. Inspired by the theories of ancient Greek philosophers, such as Plato and Aristotle, and convinced that education should be oriented to the integral formation of virtuous citizens, Egaña considered that music was an essential discipline. Through it, it would be possible to prepare students to learn aesthetic and ethical distinctions, as well as to inspire learning in other areas of knowledge, which would contribute to citizen education.
... Historically music has been related to the learning process. Aristotles believed that people became a certain quality in their characters on the account of listening to music (Lelouda, 2002). Blooms (1984) believed that music was the center of education, for giving passions and preparing the soul for peaceful reasoning. ...
... Historically music has been related to the learning process. Aristotles believed that people became a certain quality in their characters on the account of listening to music (Lelouda, 2002). Blooms (1984) believed that music was the center of education, for giving passions and preparing the soul for peaceful reasoning. ...
... In contrast to the instrumentalist and utilitarian philosophies which broadly underpinned music education until the mid-twentieth century (Stamou, 2002;Leonhard, 2012;Mark, 2012;Woodford, 2012), the pragmatist approach uses the habit concept to illustrate the existence of one end to which all value claims ultimately contribute: the human aspiration to "reflexive habituality". This refers to the ability to take up new habits and break with the old when they get in the way of "desired trajectories of action or anticipated consequences". ...
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Chapter
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