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Despite widespread development, research, and dissemination of teaching and curricular practices that improve student retention and learning, faculty often do not adopt them. This paper describes the first findings of a two-part study to improve understanding of adoption of teaching practices and curriculum by computer science faculty. The paper closes with recommendations for designers and developers of teaching innovations hoping to increase their chance of adoption.
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... Henderson et al. [70] found that, at least within Physics Education Research, the majority of publications that claim successful outcomes do not present strong supporting evidence, often only reporting faculty and student attitudinal data. Even studies that present more concrete evidence may be summarily dismissed by their target audience on the pretext of being inherently biased towards the new innovation [73], a perspective shared by at least some computer science faculty [8]. Propagators should therefore place more emphasis on the concerns and considerations of their target audience-a theme we will cover more thoroughly in subsection 5.1. ...
... Evidence strongly suggests that promoting the awareness of a specific innovation is best accomplished through word of mouth [17,52,55], since most faculty rarely reference or use educational academic publications when designing or adopting new teaching practices [32,70]. Word of mouth is most convincing when it comes from faculty with strong personal and/or institutional teaching reputations [8,83], or from faculty who work in similar institutional contexts [8,128]. As previously discussed, Froyd et al. [55] suggest involving a variety of diverse faculty in project development, who will later provide word-of-mouth advertisement for the innovation. ...
... Evidence strongly suggests that promoting the awareness of a specific innovation is best accomplished through word of mouth [17,52,55], since most faculty rarely reference or use educational academic publications when designing or adopting new teaching practices [32,70]. Word of mouth is most convincing when it comes from faculty with strong personal and/or institutional teaching reputations [8,83], or from faculty who work in similar institutional contexts [8,128]. As previously discussed, Froyd et al. [55] suggest involving a variety of diverse faculty in project development, who will later provide word-of-mouth advertisement for the innovation. ...
Conference Paper
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In this report, we survey the existing scholarship in STEM higher education regarding what motivates, encourages, and inhibits educators' decisions to adopt teaching innovations. After reviewing common theoretical foundations and considerations for adoption and dissemination studies, we identify challenges for encouraging adoption among educators in higher education. When possible, we provide evidence-based recommendations from the literature on how to overcome these challenges. We then consider the relevance of scholarship from general higher education and other STEM disciplines to the context of computer science in particular, discussing similarities and areas of divergence that would affect dissemination efforts. In order to better guide change agents in propagating beneficial teaching practices, tools, and resources, we conclude by summarizing best practices for promoting the adoption of innovations in computer science higher education.
... Henderson et al. [70] found that, at least within Physics Education Research, the majority of publications that claim successful outcomes do not present strong supporting evidence, often only reporting faculty and student attitudinal data. Even studies that present more concrete evidence may be summarily dismissed by their target audience on the pretext of being inherently biased towards the new innovation [73], a perspective shared by at least some computer science faculty [8]. Propagators should therefore place more emphasis on the concerns and considerations of their target audience-a theme we will cover more thoroughly in subsection 5.1. ...
... Evidence strongly suggests that promoting the awareness of a specific innovation is best accomplished through word of mouth [17,52,55], since most faculty rarely reference or use educational academic publications when designing or adopting new teaching practices [32,70]. Word of mouth is most convincing when it comes from faculty with strong personal and/or institutional teaching reputations [8,83], or from faculty who work in similar institutional contexts [8,128]. As previously discussed, Froyd et al. [55] suggest involving a variety of diverse faculty in project development, who will later provide word-of-mouth advertisement for the innovation. ...
... Evidence strongly suggests that promoting the awareness of a specific innovation is best accomplished through word of mouth [17,52,55], since most faculty rarely reference or use educational academic publications when designing or adopting new teaching practices [32,70]. Word of mouth is most convincing when it comes from faculty with strong personal and/or institutional teaching reputations [8,83], or from faculty who work in similar institutional contexts [8,128]. As previously discussed, Froyd et al. [55] suggest involving a variety of diverse faculty in project development, who will later provide word-of-mouth advertisement for the innovation. ...
Conference Paper
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Many great teaching techniques are presented every year at SIGCSE and other CS education conferences. Unfortunately, most of them achieve very limited adoption, with few instructors incorporating these ideas into their classrooms. There is significant literature on how to encourage instructors to adopt educational innovations in other STEM fields, but the CS education community has made only limited strides in this area. This session will feature an interactive discussion of some of the barriers that prevent the adoption of good ideas, what solutions are available, and a brief presentation of the results of an ITiCSE working group on this topic. Attendees will leave the session better equipped to promote the adoption of educational innovations, either their own or ones that they have decided to champion.
... The utilization of this style is for a multitude of reasons, including time constraints caused by professors' research and service responsibilities, along with the perceived irrelevance of these teaching innovations to their own context. Additionally, university faculty have been slow to adopt student-centered practices, especially if they perceive them as unbeneficial to themselves and their students [6]. Unfortunately, research has demonstrated that this "sage on the stage" approach provides fewer opportunities for students to engage with the material and little room to integrate their own ideas and prior experiences [7]. ...
... Background Calls for change in higher education are abundant, yet change is often elusive (Kezar, 2009), particularly in STEM (Henderson et al., 2011;Kezar et al., 2015). Researchers and change agents in STEM have amply documented the barriers to changing teaching practices (Allen & Tanner, 2005;Barker, Hovey, & Gruning, 2015;Brownell & Tanner, 2012;Finelli, Richardson, & Daly, 2013). While change is indeed hard and there are many barriers to better teaching practices, organizational change theories and social network theory mutually reveal many possible avenues to change (Beer, 2007;Colquitt et al., 2013;Daly, 2010;Wenger, 1998). ...
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