DataPDF Available

Ethical Quandaries - London and Macdonald

Authors:
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
Subaltern Studies emerged at the end of the 1970s among a collective of English and Indian historians of South Asia, and developed into a creative and malleable reworking of knowledge(s). Importantly, the subalternists contributed to an interdisciplinarity that displayed a commitment to the recovery of subaltern or 'indigenous' histories and knowledges. The idea of identity-based knowledge is necessarily decentred in a transnational enterprise such as Subaltern Studies, and concomitantly, geographical spaces, although relevant, are no longer central in determining power relations. However, changes of practice, globalisation and shifting localities, and critical awareness do not make the marginalities at the heart of the apparatus of knowledge production and its global division of labour disappear altogether. As a corpus of knowledge intellectual cohesiveness has never been a main concern for Subaltern Studies and here lies its main strength for South African anthropology. The project should be viewed as an evolving dialogue, one that privileges creative possibilities of a mutually constitutive 'conversation'. Key words: anthropologies of the South, indigenous knowledge, knowledge diversity, postcolonial anthropology, production of knowledge, Subaltern Studies [Anthropology in South Asia] must operate on a self-consciously discursive terrain and make use of its specialized skills (ethnography) to recover the historical narratives that shape cultural lives. Only then will anthropology be able to establish its relevance for South Asia in the twenty-first century. (Mathur 2000: 101)
Article
Traditionally, the southern part of the world has been considered largely as the privileged field for anthropological research carried out from the perspective of the North, where anthropology had its roots as a scientific disci pline. There is still little awareness that in the South an increasing number of particular anthropological traditions has emerged and consolidated during the last decades. This article tries to identify the principal reasons for the silencing of these processes and to point out some important elements for the charac terization of the new 'anthropologies of the South'. Their study will not only be a contribution to the knowledge of specific traditions of culture contact and anthropological sciences, but also to that of worldwide anthropology of which these specific anthropologies are a part.
Article
This paper examines a range of challenges to anthropology in post-apartheid South Africa in the hope of stimulating a much needed debate on 'doing anthropology' from the perspective of South African anthropologists who research and teach within their own complex society. It addresses questions about the continuities and discontinuities of 'doing anthropology' in South Africa, which pay special attention to the discipline's historically situated politics in the post-apartheid society. The title of the essay takes its cue from Dipesh Chakrabarty's effort to 'provincialise' Europe and builds upon the 'World Anthropologies' project, initiated by Gustavo Lins Ribeiro and Arturo Escobar I highlight the legacy of the late apartheid era's expose anthropology which critically included a reluctance to engage with cultural analysis due to apartheid's preoccupation with 'cultures' as its ideological basis. The paper argues, further, that post-apartheid anthropology needs to develop an approach to interpret the meanings and engage with the contemporary world in South Africa and beyond. It investigates three interrelated sets of critical issues: 'Doing anthropology at home': the anthropologist as investigator and citizen; the question of 'relevance', whither for a publicly engaged anthropology, and perspectives on anthropology, public culture and the postcolonial state.
Article
In this book, France's leading medical anthropologist takes on one of the most tragic stories of the global AIDS crisis-the failure of the ANC government to stem the tide of the AIDS epidemic in South Africa. Didier Fassin traces the deep roots of the AIDS crisis to apartheid and, before that, to the colonial period. One person in ten is infected with HIV in South Africa, and President Thabo Mbeki has initiated a global controversy by funding questionable medical research, casting doubt on the benefits of preventing mother-to-child transmission, and embracing dissidents who challenge the viral theory of AIDS. Fassin contextualizes Mbeki's position by sensitively exploring issues of race and genocide that surround this controversy. Basing his discussion on vivid ethnographical data collected in the townships of Johannesburg, he passionately demonstrates that the unprecedented epidemiological crisis in South Africa is a demographic catastrophe as well as a human tragedy, one that cannot be understood without reference to the social history of the country, in particular to institutionalized racial inequality as the fundamental principle of government during the past century.
Article
■ Traditionally, the southern part of the world has been considered largely as the privileged field for anthropological research carried out from the perspective of the North, where anthropology had its roots as a scientific disci pline. There is still little awareness that in the South an increasing number of particular anthropological traditions has emerged and consolidated during the last decades. This article tries to identify the principal reasons for the silencing of these processes and to point out some important elements for the charac terization of the new 'anthropologies of the South'. Their study will not only be a contribution to the knowledge of specific traditions of culture contact and anthropological sciences, but also to that of worldwide anthropology of which these specific anthropologies are a part.