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Communication, Raiding Behavior and Prey Storage in Cerapachys (Hymenoptera; Formicidae)

Authors:
PSYCHE
Vol.
89
1982
No.
1-2
COMMUNICATION,
RAIDING
BEHAVIOR
AND
PREY
STORAGE
IN
CERAPACHYS
(HYMENOPTERA;
FORMICIDAE)*
BY
BERT
HiLLDOBLER
Department
of
Organismic
and
Evolutionary
Biology,
MCZ-
Laboratories
Harvard
University,
Cambridge,
Mass.
02138
U.S,A.
INTRODUCTION
The
former
subfamily
Cerapachyinae
was
recently
recognized
by
Brown
(1975)
as
a
tribe
(Cerapachyini)
within
the
subfamily
Poneri-
nae.
All
of
the
cerapachyine
ant
species
investigated
feed
entirely
on
ants
(see
review
in
Wilson
1958;
Brown
1975).
During
foraging
cerapachyine
workers
engage
in
mass
expeditions
during
which
they
raid
the
nests
of
the
prey
species,
capturing
preferably
larvae
and
pupae,
but
also
occasionally
adults
and
returning
them
to
the
raid-
ers’
nest.
Although
the
detailed
field
observations
on
cerapachyine
forag-
ing
raids
reported
by
Wilson
(1958)
strongly
suggest
that
the
raiding
expeditions
follow
chemical
trails,
this
has
not
yet
been
experimen-
tally
investigated.
In
fact,
almost
nothing
was
hitherto
known
about
the
behavioral
organization
of
the
raiding
expeditions
and
the
under-
lying
communication
mechanism.
This
paper
presents
the
first
ex-
perimental
analysis
of
the
raiding
behavior
of
a
cerapachyine
ant
species.
MATERIALS
AND
METHODS
Three
colonies
of
Cerapachys
(?)
turneri
(turneri
group)
(acces-
sion
#163a,
b,
c;
voucher
specimens
in
Australian
National
Insect
*Manuscript
received
by
the
editor
January
22,
1982.
4
Psyche
[Vol.
89
Collection,
ANIC,
Canberra)
were
collected
from
nests
in
the
soil
in