ArticlePDF Available

Nigella sativa: The miraculous herb

Authors:

Abstract

Nigella sativa is one of the most the most revered medicinal seeds in history. The objective of this review is to emphasize the effectiveness and uses in the prevention and treatment of a number of diseases by this miraculous herb, whose importance has already been mentioned by the holy prophet. After literature survey, this review article has made an attempt to encompass its composition and some of its uses for mankind and the herb need to be further explored to reveal more of its potential uses. Nigellla Sativa, beneficial effects.
A preview of the PDF is not available
... In the content of N. sativa essential oil, 12 components were found together with eucalyptol (1,8-cineole) (48.28%) and α-pinene (14.78%), which are high in content. It has been reported that eucalyptol, the main component of N. sativa essential oil, completely inhibits the growth of various fungal species (Naz, 2011 In addition, essential oil of black cumin seed completely inhibits mycelial growth of F. verticillioides (Elgorban et al., 2015). Cumin with important medicinal properties is a well-known aromatic plant. ...
Article
Full-text available
Yield losses are experienced in corn fields due to stalk and ear rot disease. The fungicides used against the disease can not show the desired effect and the problem of resistance arises over time. For this reason, it is necessary to develop new strategies in the control against the disease. In this study, it was aim to determine the inhibitory effects of essential oils of rosemary, black cumin, cumin and sandalwood, and ginger against Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium pseudograminearum under in vitro conditions. The essential oils were applied in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 μl mL-1. PDA medium free of essential oils was used as negative control and PDA medium containing commercial fungicide (80 g l-1 Triticonazole, 40 g l-1 Pyraclostrobin-BASF company) was used as positive control. The experiment was carried out in a randomized plot design with three replications. In addition, chemical content analysis of essential oils was determined by GC-MS method. As a result of the study, as the dose of rosemary, black cumin, sandalwood and ginger essential oils increased, their inhibitory effects against both pathogens increased, and these effects were found close to each other. While the highest inhibitory effect against F. verticillioides and F. pseudograminearum was detected in the positive control treatment of cumin essential oil, 82.1% and 78.9%, respectively, this effect was found to be 74.6% and 68.3% in 4 μl mL-1 dose, respectively. However, more detailed studies should be carried out with these essential oils under field conditions.
... In the content of N. sativa essential oil, 12 components were found together with eucalyptol (1,8-cineole) (48.28%) and α-pinene (14.78%), which are high in content. It has been reported that eucalyptol, the main component of N. sativa essential oil, completely inhibits the growth of various fungal species (Naz, 2011 In addition, essential oil of black cumin seed completely inhibits mycelial growth of F. verticillioides (Elgorban et al., 2015). Cumin with important medicinal properties is a well-known aromatic plant. ...
Article
Yield losses are experienced in corn fields due to stalk and ear rot disease. The fungicides used against the disease cannot show the desired effect and the problem of resistance arises over time. For this reason, it is necessary to develop new strategies in the control against the disease. In this study, it was aim to determine the inhibitory effects of essential oils of rosemary, black cumin, cumin and sandalwood, and ginger against Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium pseudograminearum under in vitro conditions. The essential oils were applied in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 µl mL-1. PDA medium free of essential oils was used as negative control and PDA medium containing commercial fungicide (80 g l-1 Triticonazole, 40 g l-1 Pyraclostrobin-BASF company) was used as positive control. The experiment was carried out in a randomized plot design with three replications. In addition, chemical content analysis of essential oils was determined by GC-MS method. As a result of the study, as the dose of rosemary, black cumin, sandalwood and ginger essential oils increased, their inhibitory effects against both pathogens increased, and these effects were found close to each other. While the highest inhibitory effect against F. verticillioides and F. pseudograminearum was detected in the positive control treatment of cumin essential oil, 82.1% and 78.9%, respectively, this effect was found to be 74.6% and 68.3% in 4 µl mL-1 dose, respectively. However, more detailed studies should be carried out with these essential oils under field conditions.
... At other doses of ginger essential oil, mycelial growth of PHCVd3 was inhibited between 16.2% and 40.1%, while mycelial growth of PHCVd47 was inhibited between 10.2% and 39.5% (Table 3). Black cumin from the Ranunculaceae family is one of the most useful essential oils and is an industrial plant used in the food, medicine and cosmetics industries [31,32]. GC-MS analysis of N. sativa essential oil resulted in the detection of 12 components representing 100% of the essential oil. ...
... Its beneficial uses are also mentioned by the 10th-century physician Avicenna in his book 'The Canon of medicine' [15]. Because of its health benefits and a broad spectrum of traditional medicinal uses, this nutraceutical herb has been described in the literature as a miraculous herb [16], prophetic medicine [17], habbat al barakah [18], a holy herb of the Middle East [19], a mine for multi cure [20], a novel beauty care ingredient [21], a complementary drug [22], a universal healer [23], a marvel herb [24], a black seed of miracle [25], blessed seed [26], and a wonder herb [27]. ...
Article
COVID-19 has had an impact on human quality of life and economics. Scientists have been identifying remedies for its prevention and treatment from all possible sources, including plants. Nigella sativa L. (NS) is an important medicinal plant of Islamic value. This review highlights the anti-COVID-19 potential, clinical trials, inventions, and patent literature related to NS and its major chemical constituents, like thymoquinone. The literature was collected from different databases, including Pubmed, Espacenet, and Patentscope. The literature supports the efficacy of NS, NS oil (NSO), and its chemical constituents against COVID-19. The clinical data imply that NS and NSO can prevent and treat COVID-19 patients with a faster recovery rate. Several inventions comprising NS and NSO have been claimed in patent applications to prevent/treat COVID-19. The patent literature cites NS as an immunomodulator, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, a source of anti-SARS-CoV-2 compounds, and a plant having protective effects on the lungs. The available facts indicate that NS, NSO, and its various compositions have all the attributes to be used as a promising remedy to prevent, manage, and treat COVID-19 among high-risk people as well as for the therapy of COVID-19 patients of all age groups as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Many compositions of NS in combination with countless medicinal herbs and medicines are still unexplored. Accordingly, the authors foresee a bright scope in developing NS-based anti-COVID-19 composition for clinical use in the future.
... N. sativa is native to South west Asia and Africa. and grown in Mediterranean countrie, Turkey, Syria, India, Srilanka, Iran , Albania , Saudi Arabia and other ( Naz, 2011 ;Chaudhry et al., 2020) . Nigella sativa seed is one of the most traditional medicinal plants used for diseases treatment, such as asthma, headache, inflammation, eczema, bronchitis, rheumatism, hypertension, anorexia, amenorrhea, paralysis and mental debility. ...
Article
Full-text available
This current study investigated the influence of Magnetic Field from Winding coil magnet about ( 400 mT ) for different exposure periods ( 0, 30 , 60 , 90 , 120 , 150 min ) on seed germination, callus initiation, and callus fresh weight, protein, carbohydrate and proline content and vitality , in addition to the efficacy of some antioxidant enzymes . The results indicated that the highest seed germination percentage was when exposed for an (90 Minutes). Also found that the best exposure period for acceleration of callus initiation was (30 minutes). Fresh weight, protein, proline, carbohydrates content and callus vitality got a better result under (90 minutes) of magnetic field exposure . On the other hand, the antioxidant enzymes activity significantly increased with 150 minutes M.F treatment.
... In our study, it was found that kidney tissue selenium concentration increased in all experimental groups, but these increases were not statistically significant compared to the control group. NS may increase Se accumulation in kidney tissues in two different ways; first one is Se is involved in NS extract (Naz, 2011) and the second one NS increases Se intake to tissues. ...
... Volatile oil of N. sativa seeds when used on different human cancer cell line showed noticeable cytotoxic effects on them (Hosseini et al., 2013). MCF-7 breast cancer cells when exposed to alcohol and aqueous extract of N. sativa seeds, were completely able to inactivate the growth of these cells, which indicate that the extract alone or in combination to oxidative stress works as a potent anticancer agent (Naz, 2011;Sarker et al., 2011). El-Kadi and many other researchers used in vivo studies evaluated immunomodulatory activity of N. sativa seed oil performed on healthy volunteers in regard to suppressor T cells and cytotoxic activity of NK cells, concluded enhance in ratio of both suppressor T cells and cytotoxic activity of NK cells after 4 weeks of N. sativa seed oil consumption (Azeem et al., 2014;El-Kadi and Kandil, 1986). ...
Chapter
The immunoglobulins, HLA (human leukocyte antigen), and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors show a high level of polymorphism in genetics and variation in the human population. IgG antibodies and related genetic markers (GM) are studied for a long time to understand their connection and effect on human disease spreading and amino acid substitutions. KIR (killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor) is found to differ in a population at high frequency and variation in allelic occurrence. The presences of these variations are found to connect with natural selection and immigration of human in history. The uses of immunogenetic in anthropological studies help to examine peopling history and adaptation of ancient humans to their environment. With the development of tools and techniques in genetics and computer mitochondrial DNA, microsatellites, SNPs, and Y-chromosome are tools used for anthropological studies. In this chapter, we focused on different uses of immunogenetics in anthropological studies.
Chapter
Black cumin is a twelve-monthly plant that bears flowers, but it is part of the Ranunculaceae family. The active biochemical elements of the plant come from its black trigonal seeds. It has been used to cure various ailments both traditionally and therapeutically in many areas of the world. Black cumin seed (BCS) has a broader usage in food applications as a preservative, spice, flavoring agent and has been employed to deal with some diseases such as diabetes, infection, inflammation, and blood pressure. Also, in Pharmacological Sciences, it has been applied as an antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory. BCSs are high in vegetable protein, fiber, fats, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins, and other biochemical active compounds. This topic intends to offer a complete evaluation of the nutritional adequacy of BCS and examine the seed's carbohydrate and polysaccharide characteristics.
Article
Full-text available
The chemical composition of the extracted fixed oil (total fatty acid composition) and volatile oil of Nigella sativa L. seeds grown in Iran were determined by GC and GC/MS. Eight fatty acids (99.5%) and thirty-two compounds (86.7%) have been identified in the fixed and volatile oils, respectively. The main fatty acids of the fixed oil were linoleic acid (55.6%), oleic acid (23.4%), and palmitic acid (12.5%). The major compounds of the volatile oil were trans-anethole (38.3%), p-cymene (14.8%), limonene (4.3%), and carvone (4.0%).
Article
Full-text available
Cumin is one of the commonly used spices in food preparations. It is also used in traditional medicine as a stimulant, a carminative and an astringent. In this study, we characterized the antioxidant activity of three commercially available cumin varieties, viz., cumin (Cuminum cyminum), black cumin (Nigella sativa) and bitter cumin (C. nigrum). The antioxidant capacity of cumin varieties was tested on Fe2+ ascorbate induced rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation, soybean lipoxygenase dependent lipid peroxidation and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging methods. The total phenolic content of methanolic extracts of cumin varieties ranged from 4.1 to 53.6mgg–1 dry weight. Methanolic extracts of all the three varieties of cumin showed higher antioxidant activity compared with that of the aqueous extract. Among the cumin varieties, bitter cumin showed the highest antioxidant activity followed by cumin and black cumin in different antioxidant systems. IC50 values of the methanolic extract of bitter cumin were found to be 0.32, 0.1 and 0.07mg dry weight of cumin seeds on the lipoxygenase dependent lipid peroxidation system, the DPPH radical scavenging system and the rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation system, respectively. The data also show that cumin is a potent antioxidant capable of scavenging hydroxy, peroxy and DPPH free radicals and thus inhibits radical-mediated lipid peroxidation. The high antioxidant activity of bitter cumin can be correlated to the high phenolic content among the three cumin varieties. Thus, bitter cumin with a high phenolic content and good antioxidant activity can be supplemented for both nutritional purposes and preservation of foods.
Article
Full-text available
Background A decoction comprised of Nigella sativa seeds, Hemidesmus indicus root and Smilax glabra rhizome is used to treat cancer patients in Sri Lanka. However, the anti-carcinogenic properties of this decoction have not been experimentally confirmed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the above decoction could protect against chemically induce hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods The effects of this decoction on diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced hepatocarcinogenesis were examined in male Wistar rats using the medium term bioassay system of Ito, based on a 2-step model of hepatocarcinogenesis. Rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 10 each. Groups 1 to 4 were injected with DEN (200 mg/kg) to initiate carcinogenesis. Twenty-four hours later groups 1 and 2 were administered the decoction at 4 g/kg body weight/day (dose 1) and 6 g/kg body weight/day (dose 2), respectively. Group 3 and group 4 were given distilled water instead of the decoction and a suspension of garlic powder (20 g/kg body weight/day) in distilled water (positive control), respectively. Group 5 and 6 were injected with normal saline and twenty-four hours later group 5 was given distilled water (normal control) while group 6 was given decoction dose 2 (decoction control). Oral feeding continued for two weeks after which all rats were subjected to 2/3 partial hepatectomy to promote carcinogenesis. Oral feeding continued for eight more weeks. At the end of the 10th week, rats were sacrificed and samples of livers taken for immunohistochemical studies. Carcinogenic potential was scored by comparing the number, area and staining intensity of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci and the number of cells/cm2 of the positive foci in the livers of the six groups of rats. Results The number and area of DEN-mediated GST-P positive foci, number of cells/cm2 of foci and staining intensity of the foci were significantly (P > 0.001) reduced by the decoction and garlic in the order dose 2 = garlic >dose 1. Conclusion Overall results indicate that the decoction comprised of N. sativa, S. glabra and H. indicus has the potential to protect rat liver against DEN induced hepatocarcinogenesis
Article
Nigella sativa oil (NSO), a herbaceous plant, has been used for thousands of years for culinary and medical purposes. This study aimed to investigate the anticonvulsant and antioxidant activities of NSO on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) kindling seizures in mice. Nigella sativa oil was tested for its ability (i) to suppress the convulsive and lethal effects of PTZ in kindled mice (anti-epileptogenic effect), (ii) to attenuate the PTZ-induced oxidative injury in the brain tissue (antioxidant effect) when given as a pretreatment prior to each PTZ injection during kindling acquisition. Valproate, a major antiepileptic drug, was also tested for comparison. Both substances studied significantly decreased oxidative injury in the mouse brain tissue in comparison with the PTZ-kindling group. Nigella sativa oil was found to be the most effective in preventing PTZ-induced seizures relative to valproate. Nigella sativa oil showed anti-epileptogenic properties as it reduced the sensitivity of kindled mice to the convulsive and lethal effects of PTZ; valproate was ineffective in preventing development of any of these effects. The data obtained support the hypothesis that neuroprotective action of NSO may correlate with its ability to inhibit not only excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation but also seizure generation.
Article
A simple, precise and accurate high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method has been established for the determination of rutin in the whole plant powder of Amaranthus spinosus Linn. Rutin has been reported to have anti-diabetic, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activity. A methanol extract of the whole plant powder was used for the experimental work. The concentration of rutin in the whole plant powder was found to be 0.15%. Separation was performed on silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates with ethyl acetate:formic acid:methanol:distilled water in the proportion 10:0.9:1.1:1.7 (v/v), as mobile phase. The determination was carried out using the densitometric absorbance mode at 363nm. Rutin response was linear over the range 10–60μg mL−1. The HPTLC method was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, accuracy, precision and reproducibility.
Article
Listeria monocytogenes is a major foodborne pathogen in the United States. Effective methods for reducing L. monocytogenes in foods would reduce the likelihood of foodborne outbreaks of listeriosis, and decrease economic losses to the food industry. Nigella sativa is a herbaceous plant, whose seeds (black seed) have been used as a spice and condiment in foods in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to determine the antibacterial effect of black seed oil on twenty strains of L. monocytogenes by disc diffusion method. A population of 7.0 log CFU of each strain of L. monocytogenes was inoculated on duplicate plates containing antibiotic medium one agar. The plates were allowed to dry at room temperature for 15 min. Three discs (6 mm diameter), each impregnated with 10 μl of black seed oil, vegetable oil (oil control), or gentamicin (positive control) were placed on each inoculated plate. The plates were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h, and were observed for zones of L. monocytogenes growth inhibition. Black seed oil exhibited a strong antibacterial activity against all the strains of L. monocytogenes, yielding a significantly (P<0.01) larger inhibition zone than that of gentamicin. The mean zones of inhibition produced by black seed oil and gentamicin were 31.50 ± 1.0 and 14.80 ± 0.50, respectively. The vegetable oil had no inhibitory effect on L. monocytogenes. Results indicate that black seed oil could potentially be used to inhibit L. monocytogenes, but appropriate applications in foods need to be validated.
Article
The seeds of Nigella sativa are used commonly in the Middle East as a traditional medicine to treat a variety of health conditions. This paper examines the levels of selenium, dl-α-tocopherol, dl-γ-tocopherol, all-trans-retinol, thymoquinone and thymol in different brands of N. sativa seeds purchased from local markets in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Selenium was determined by the inductively coupled plasma spectrometry coupled with the hydride system. dl-α-tocopherol, dl-γ-tocopherol, all-trans-retinol, thymoquinone and thymol were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The average mean concentrations (mg/kg fresh weight) of selenium, dl-α-tocopherol, dl-γ-tocopherol, all-trans-retinol, thymoquinone and thymol in all tested seeds were 0.17±0.10, 9.02±4.84, 5.42±3.96, 0.27±0.27, 2224.49±1629.50 and 169.35±100.12, respectively. The concentrations of these analytes were significantly affected by the country of origin of the N. sativa. It is concluded that N. sativa provides an important source of antioxidants.
Article
Proximate analysis of black cumin seeds showed a composition of 20.85% protein, 38.20% fat, 4.64% moisture, 4.37% ash, 7.94% crude fibre and 31.94% total carbohydrates. Potassium, phosphorus, sodium and iron were the predominant elements present. Zinc, calcium, magnesium, manganese and copper were found at lower levels. However, lead, cadmium and arsenic were not detected in the seeds. Linoleic and oleic acids were the major unsaturated fatty acids while palmitic acid was the main saturated one. Glutamic acid, arginine and aspartic acid were the main amino acids present while cystine and methionine were the minor amino acids. These results indicate the high nutritional potential of Saudi black cumin seeds especially as a source of protein and fat. The total aerobic bacterial count was 7 × 107 cfu/g and the yeast and mould counts were 4 × 102 cfu/g. The low numbers observed for Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus make black cumin seeds acceptable, without any associated health hazard.
Article
Nigella sativa and Nigella damascena are two annual species of the family Ranunculaceae, investigated recently for the oil, essential oil and other biologically active constituents of their seeds. They are presently used in traditional medicine and for culinary preparations in many countries, as ornamentals, and are also considered for their abundant nectar secretion. One accession of N. sativa and two of N. damascena were compared on three spring sowing dates in northern Italy. Seed yield, yield components, essential oil content and composition were evaluated. Oil content was also measured in N. sativa. Total and seed biomass decreased with delayed sowing, because of a reduction in both seed number per plant and mean seed weight. Seed number per plant was the more important yield component for both species. Actual seed yield was lower for N. sativa, whereas yield potential seemed to be similar for the two species. The main constraint to yield potential of N. sativa seemed to be connected to its short vegetative phase, with consequently low number of seeds per unit area. The essential oil composition differed markedly in the two species. Monoterpenes were dominant in N. sativa, with p-cymene and thymol as the main components. The amount of pharmacologically active thymoquinone was lower than reported in the literature. N. damascena essential oil was almost completely composed of sesquiterpenes. Essential oil composition was very stable in N. damascena, but markedly affected by sowing date in N. sativa. Oil yield of N. sativa decreased with delayed sowing. As a whole, the two species had positive agronomic traits, such as short growing cycle, low seed shattering and low susceptibility to diseases. This, together with different possible options for direct utilisation or industrial processing, may determine an interest in further considering the two species as potential new multi-purpose crops.