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Integrierte Preisvergleiche in Suchmaschinen und deren Auswirkung auf das Geschäftsmodell klassischer Preissuchmaschinen

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die Teilnehmer mussten das Produkt daher nicht real kaufen und bezahlen
  • Kaufentscheidung
fiktive Kaufentscheidung, die Teilnehmer mussten das Produkt daher nicht real kaufen und bezahlen. Längerfristige Geschäftsbeziehungen mit einzelnen Händlern und das daraus entstanden Vertrauen können ebenfalls Einfluss auf die Händlerauswahl nehmen.
Teilnehmer mussten das Produkt daher nicht real kaufen und bezahlen. Längerfristige Geschäftsbeziehungen mit einzelnen Händlern und das daraus entstanden Vertrauen können ebenfalls Einfluss auf die Händlerauswahl nehmen
  • Kaufentscheidung Eine Fiktive
eine fiktive Kaufentscheidung, die Teilnehmer mussten das Produkt daher nicht real kaufen und bezahlen. Längerfristige Geschäftsbeziehungen mit einzelnen Händlern und das daraus entstanden Vertrauen können ebenfalls Einfluss auf die Händlerauswahl nehmen.
  • B Pan
  • Hembrooke
  • Joachims
  • Lorigo
  • Gay
  • Granka
Pan B, H Hembrooke, T Joachims, L Lorigo, G Gay und L Granka (2007): In Google we trust: Users' decisions on rank, position, and relevance. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 12 (3):801-823.
  • J Zhang
  • Fang Und Or Liu
  • Sheng
Zhang J, X Fang und OR Liu Sheng (2007): Online Consumer Search Depth: Theories and New Findings. Journal of Management Information Systems 23 (3):71-95.