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Corporate Social Responsibility

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Corporate Social Responsibility

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... Werther & Chandler (2005).54 Carroll (2015). ...
... Carroll (2015), p. 93.474 Kuhlman & Farrington (2010), p. 3439.475 Carroll (2015), p. 93.476 Kuhlman & Farrington (2010), p. 3439. ...
... Carroll (2015), p. 93.474 Kuhlman & Farrington (2010), p. 3439.475 Carroll (2015), p. 93.476 Kuhlman & Farrington (2010), p. 3439. ...
Thesis
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Many critical business scholars have disregarded sustainability standards and corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities as mere window dressing, operating as a smokescreen to hide illegitimate corporate practices. Others have pointed to these activities as hegemonic articulations, as a way to strengthen corporate alliances with and dominance over other actors in society. In this study I take an autoethnographic approach and focus on my previous employer, the oil company Bankers Petroleum Ltd. (Bankers) and their operations in Patos-Marinza, an area in south-central Albania where oil extraction facilities and residences lie close to one another. Through the lens of the Gramscian concept of hegemony and Political Discourse Theory, I examine three grievances raised by Patos-Marinza residents and Bankers’ response to these complaints. My analysis shows how community demands, that could otherwise have put pressure on improved corporate practices, were isolated and silenced in the name of sustainability and corporate responsibility. My conclusion is that rather than disregarding compliance to sustainability standards and CSR activities as window dressing, it is important to examine what these do in specific empirical contexts. As sustainability discourses continue to expand in the corporate world, this study highlights the need to critically examine if they foster change away from harmful business models or simply function as legitimising mechanisms that allow corporate power to grow stronger.
... The analysis of the literature on CSR, produced since the 1950s, evidences the existence of a wide diversity of contributions on this field and, particularly, on the definition of the concept (Carroll, 1999(Carroll, , 2015Dahlsrud, 2008;Garriga & Melé, 2004). The academic debate on this topic has been approached from different perspectives and within the framework of researching for answers to different topics, among which are: a) finding a definition and a justification for CSR (Carroll, 1979;Epstein, 2007); b) establishing its sphere of action (Carroll, 1991;Sethi, 1975); c) analysing their recipients (Carroll, 1991;Jones, 1980); d) identifying their returns (Litz, 1996;Murray & Montanari, 1986;Porter & Kramer, 2006); and e) proposing models to manage CSR (Waddock, 2004). ...
... Despite this consensus, some confusion persists. Carroll (2015) identifies five conceptual frameworks with which CSR is often confused: shared value theory, stakeholder theory, corporate citizenship, business ethics and sustainability. In the same way, in businesses sometimes the concept of CSR is confused and reduced to the commitment to society or philanthropy. ...
... Outside of the academic world, and already in the 20 th century, the European Union affirmed that to fully realize its social responsibility, the firm must "identify, prevent and mitigate its possible adverse consequences" (Comissão das Comunidades Europeias, 2001). More recently, Carroll (2015) observed that socially responsible management of impacts covers two dimensions: on one hand, protecting society from negative impacts and, on the other, contributing to improving society's conditions through deliberately sought positive impacts. Finally, we can see CSR as a notion through which organizations reflect the interests of society by assuming responsibility for the impact of their activities on a wide variety of stakeholders, as customers, suppliers, employees, shareholders, communities, among others, as well as the environment and society (MacDonald, Clarke, Huang, & Seitanidi, 2019;Wymer & Rundle-thiele, 2017). ...
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The incorporation of Corporate Social Responsibility in companies depends on the way their managers understand this concept. Given that most of these managers are trained in postgraduate courses, the objective of this research is to realise how postgraduate students from Brazil, Portugal and Uruguay understand the Corporate Social Responsibility concept. An interview guide based on open questions, whose answers were analysed by qualitative and quantitative techniques, was applied to a convenience sample of students. The presence or absence of the main dimensions of the Corporate Social Responsibility concept proposed in the ISO 26000 Guide was identified in the responses. The results show that the analysed samples have a partial interpretation of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility, in which an interpretive bias predominates, meaning that they associate this concept with the commitment to society and the involvement in environmental issues, instead of having an integral perspective idea, and do not consider Corporate Social Responsibility as the responsible management of the externalities and the incorporation of stakeholders' expectations in decisions, as established in the ISO 26000 guide. It is concluded that management postgraduate students of these countries do not have an adequate and sufficient knowledge of Corporate Social Responsibility. CÓMO ENTIENDEN LOS ESTUDIANTES DE POSGRADO EL CONCEPTO DE RESPONSABILIDAD SOCIAL EMPRESARIAL-UN ENFOQUE COMPARATIVO ENTRE URUGUAY, BRASIL Y PORTUGAL
... Since the early age of business, profit maximization for the owners, then shareholders, is the mere goal of every firm, while actions towards nonowners' benefits is primely considered as a "doctrine" or public deception (Friedman, 1970). However, followed by the rapid change in the global business environment and the social awareness of responsible investment and consumption, corporate social responsibilities (CSR) is raised as the new trend of business strategies (Carroll, 2015;Low, 2016). These activities are believed not only to fulfill the stakeholders' expectations but also to help firms gain certain advantages (Freeman & Dmytriyev, 2017). ...
... These activities are believed not only to fulfill the stakeholders' expectations but also to help firms gain certain advantages (Freeman & Dmytriyev, 2017). Nonetheless, academic arguments over the relation between CSR and corporate financial performance (CFP) are still inconsistent (Orlitzky, Schmidt, & Rynes, 2003), causing senior managers' hesitations to activate their social schemes (Carroll, 2015). ...
... Although the CSR concept has emerged since 1950s and gone globally now, it lacks an acceptable and unique, or official, definition (Rahman, 2011). According to many scholars, e.g., Carroll (1995Carroll ( , 2015, Jamali and Karam (2016), Rahman (2011), CSR's interpretations and expressions vary across the local context of social, economic, political, environmental issues and time periods. In the very first period, CSR primarily consists of a firm's economic contributions such as that of employment, payrolls , and social audits (Carroll, 1995). ...
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In the latest decades, corporate social responsibilities (CSR) are incrementally noticed in emerging countries regarding to the surge of globalization and the advance of social concerns. However, there exist opposing arguments on how CSR practices influence a firm’s financial performance (CFP), either in theoretical or empirical perspectives, causing many managers’ hesitation in CSR engagement. This study, therefore, examines the impacts of CSR on CFP, considering the individual effect of each CSR endeavor by using the data from listed firms’ financial statements during the period 2015-2019 and panel regression analysis methods. The findings reveal inconstant effects of different CSR activities on CFP. Specifically, a firm’s fulfillment of shareholders’ and customers’ interests contributes to raise its profitability, while its engagement in the benefits of employees and creditors causes a reduction in financial returns. Interestingly, the correlations between firms’ responsibilies towards regulators and suppliers and CFP are statistically insignificant. Furthermore, we make pairwise marginal comparisons to identify the distinctions of CSR-CFP relations across industries. The results only indicate that listed firms in Utilities sector have the lower level of CSR intensity than those in Consumer Discretionary and Consumer Staples sectors. The implications and limitations are also discussed in this study.
... During the 1970s, CSR gained force due either to enlightened self-interest or in response to regulatory requirements or activists protests. Carroll [78] (p. 88) called this the period of "managing corporate social responsibility", in the function of the social transformation of business, as they began to formalize and institutionalize their responses to social and public issues. ...
... Therefore, the designation CSR became increasingly popular, which resulted in its use under many different contexts and to such an extent that its meaning became unclear [78]. However, as new contributions were made, the CSR model was delineating around stakeholders and their needs, while CS was delineating around corporate governance and competitiveness. ...
... Therefore, we argue that the definition of CSR must include "stakeholder management" [47,50,62,66,[71][72][73] (which considers current social issues such as gender equity), "concern for environmental issues" [28,45,46] (the impacts of the production process are excluded here, which deserves a separate topic), and the "positioning of the company in relation to social issues" (issues not directly related to the company) [68,80,83,85,86]. Note that Carroll's view [49,52,53,55,56,67,68,78] is present in all topics. Environmental management [43,44] considers issues related to the company's products and production processes. ...
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The concept of sustainable development (SD) was introduced in the “Our Common Future” report, launched in 1987, which influenced the emergence of many studies related to the role played by organizations as actors supporting SD. SD is a consolidated concept; however, since 1987, many political, social, and natural events have occurred on our planet, which have impacted companies’ behaviors. However, the diversity of research from different fields has provoked, among the academic community, a lack of clarity surrounding “sustainability” (S), “corporate sustainability” (CS) and “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) concepts. This lack of clarity can also be identified in companies, which have referred to “sustainability” only in the environmental field. Recently, increased discussions related to corporate sustainability metrics have shed light on the ESG criteria (environmental, social, and governance), increasing misperceptions associated with the concept. Ambiguous definitions and constructs may prevent managers from identifying sustainability goals for their companies. Therefore, literature reviews as a research method are more relevant than ever. Thus, in this work, we aim to answer the following question: How should we integrate different perspectives on corporate sustainability, in order to broaden the understanding of the concept? In this study, we conducted a focused bibliographic review and revisited the papers that most influenced the construction of the concepts. The information in this paper is helpful to improve the understanding of CS; to provide specific insights into the studies that have investigated this field; to help managers and entrepreneurs who are improving CS actions in their companies; and to support academia by putting together a large amount of information about this theme in one paper.
... As the business environment becomes more transparent (Iglesias et al., 2020), stakeholders are increasingly pressuring companies to fulfill their corporate social responsibility (CSR), which is defined as the responsibilities that companies have to society beyond their economic obligations (Carroll, 2010). Because the legitimacy and reputation of an organization are at stake, proper communication of CSR has become a prevailing issue in corporate communication (Verboven, 2011). ...
... CSR refers to a company's responsibilities to society that are beyond its obligations to stockholders, which encompass economic (i.e., the responsibility to be profitable), legal (i.e., the responsibility to adhere to legal requirements), ethical (the responsibility to act morally), and philanthropic (i.e., the responsibility to give back to society) responsibilities (Carroll, 2010). In the current business environment, companies are expected to engage in CSR initiatives (Park et al., 2014). ...
... It is also important for companies to foster ethical climates to help employees uphold ethics (Huang et al., 2019). A company's CSR initiatives can not only lead job seekers to view the company as an attractive employer (Greening & Turban, 2000) and to pursue employment (Bauer & Aiman-Smith, 1996) but also increase current employees' job satisfaction and productivity (Carroll, 2010) and retention of employees (Rupp et al., 2006). ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) identify shifts in prioritization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues and (2) identify the CSR issues in which companies are currently involved, as indicated in their website communications. Corporate communications are also examined for possible variations of CSR focus between manufacturers, retailers and service firms. Design/methodology/approach In order to identify the CSR issues in which companies are currently involved and detect any shifts, a content analysis was conducted of the 2021 Fortune 100 company websites, specifically cataloging CSR communications. This data was compared with CSR communications on Fortune 100 company websites in 2015. CSR issues are also examined within each industry categorization: manufacturing, retail and service. Findings Findings indicate that companies have reduced the number of CSR issues prioritized in their website communications. In 2015, companies gave prominence to an average of seven CSR issues on their websites, today the average is three CSR issues. Today, the CSR issues prioritized most commonly are diversity and sustainability. However, these issues are prioritized by only half of the companies. Previously, the vast majority of Fortune 100 companies prioritized the same top issues. That is not the case today. This shift may suggest that companies are narrowing their focus to fewer CSR issues, perhaps those that align with company goals. Originality/value This study provides information to keep company executives and academicians abreast of prominent CSR issues and terminology found in the marketplace. As executives make choices about committing resources to social issues, knowledge of what the Fortune 100 is doing can help in that decision-making process.
... CSR as a concept has been debated, with its benefits and pitfalls, since the 1960s (Walton, 1964;Davis, 1967;Eilbirt and Parket, 1973;Jones, 1980;Mintzberg, 1983;Epstein, 1987;Carroll, 1999;Smith, 2003;Aguinis and Glavas, 2012;Latap ı Agudelo et al., 2019). Although there still is not a definition that meets scholars' consensus, CSR can be broadly identified as a social contract between business and society (Carroll, 2015), one that simultaneously encompasses business ethics and stakeholder management; corporate citizenship and sustainability (Carroll, 2015). ...
... CSR as a concept has been debated, with its benefits and pitfalls, since the 1960s (Walton, 1964;Davis, 1967;Eilbirt and Parket, 1973;Jones, 1980;Mintzberg, 1983;Epstein, 1987;Carroll, 1999;Smith, 2003;Aguinis and Glavas, 2012;Latap ı Agudelo et al., 2019). Although there still is not a definition that meets scholars' consensus, CSR can be broadly identified as a social contract between business and society (Carroll, 2015), one that simultaneously encompasses business ethics and stakeholder management; corporate citizenship and sustainability (Carroll, 2015). ...
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Purpose This study aims to propose the application of relational leadership theory (RLT) for magnifying the dynamics involving the individual who participates in the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in the hospitality sector. Dominant theories in this field fail to show what drivers affect such dynamics. The key preoccupation of those frameworks is the extent to which CSR can attract, motivate and retain employees. Design/methodology/approach This study uses both qualitative and quantitative methods. Through a quantitative survey involving circa 1,300 hotels, and qualitative semi-structured interviews, this study seeks to unpick what actors identify as sustainable practice driving motives, which, in turn, influence the implementation of CSR initiatives. In this perspective, actors drift away from being mere receivers, or executors of sustainable practices, acquiring a more active role. The qualitative data of this study are collected through semi-structured interviews in hotels in Italy, the UK and Pakistan and run the quantitative survey across the same three countries. Findings The quantitative data showed a significant positive correlation between economic incentive and teamwork in CSR practices. This aligned with the qualitative data that showed two main drivers – responsibility and convenience – displaying characteristics of collectivity and collaboration, which tie to the principles of RLT. Research limitations/implications This study posits the relevance of relatedness at multiple levels to spot how CSR initiatives can produce varying “hospitality work” outcomes. Originality/value By focusing on actors and identifying the driving motives of sustainable initiatives, this paper suggests that leaderful practice stands at the core of CSR implementation.
... Th issues of CSR and sustainable development have been explored by a multitude of r searchers [28][29][30][31][32][33] and the majority of the theories of CSR according to them concentra on the following aspects: the execution of economic aims to ensure long-term profits, th responsible use of business power, the integration of the requirements, and the pursuit o the good of the community [34,35]. The details relating to these aspects are dependent o the quality of the reports prepared by the organizations, which constitute part of the soci dialogue between a firm and its stakeholders, while their scope should encompass thre principal composite elements of the concept, namely: economic, social and environmenta In the past, within the framework of research on CSR, emphasis was placed on the issu of the responsibility of the organization itself, or the impact of the activities of CSR on th financial performance of the organization; however, currently it also refers to the integra tion of the stakeholders within the framework of the policies conducted, while also th decisions and operations undertaken [36]. ...
... The details relating to these aspects are dependent on the quality of the reports prepared by the organizations, which constitute part of the social dialogue between a firm and its stakeholders, while their scope should encompass three principal composite elements of the concept, namely: economic, social and environmental. In the past, within the framework of research on CSR, emphasis was placed on the issue of the responsibility of the organization itself, or the impact of the activities of CSR on the financial performance of the organization; however, currently it also refers to the integration of the stakeholders within the framework of the policies conducted, while also the decisions and operations undertaken [36]. ...
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This paper aims to investigate whether the environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) score of companies operating in the energy sector is associated with their corporate financial performance (CFP). The research covered data from eight companies with a dominant position in the Polish energy sector. The research used the comparative analysis between ESG performance and accounting-based measures of profitability: return on equity (ROE), return on assets (ROA) and return on sales (ROS). Additionally, reference was also made to the DuPont model. The acquired results do not reveal repetitive dependencies that would facilitate the discovery of a pattern of the impact of the factors of ESG on the financial performance of enterprises. Despite indicating the cases of correlations between the ESG scores and CFP at a high level, indeed sometimes at a very high level, the particular case studies significantly differ from each other. This may be caused by the fact that Polish enterprises from the energy sector illustrate far-reaching specifics, among others, with regard to the key significance of the entities with a prevalent state ownership and strict administrative regulations, which are subject to the energy market, state of development and structure of the whole sector in Poland. Thus, this is also why the mechanisms or dependencies, whose existence it is possible to expect in conditions of free competition, may be weakened or even eliminated in Polish conditions.
... Sürdürülebilirlik kavramı kurumsal düzeyde ele alındığında firmaların hissedar ve paydaşlarının beklentilerini gelecek nesillerin ihtiyaçlarından ödün vermeksizin karşılama çabaları olarak tanımlanabilir (Dyllick ve Hockerts, 2002). Kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk ise ekonomik faaliyetlerin toplum beklentilerini karşılayacak şekilde sürdürülmesi ve üretim/dağıtım süreçlerinin sosyoekonomik refahı artıracak şekilde dizayn edilmesini ifade etmektedir (Frederick, 1960 (Carroll, 2015). Uygulama alanı dikkate alındığında ise Global Fortune 250 firmalarının %95'inin sürdürülebilirlik raporu yayımladığı bilinmektedir (Carroll, 2015 (Minard, 2016). ...
... Kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk ise ekonomik faaliyetlerin toplum beklentilerini karşılayacak şekilde sürdürülmesi ve üretim/dağıtım süreçlerinin sosyoekonomik refahı artıracak şekilde dizayn edilmesini ifade etmektedir (Frederick, 1960 (Carroll, 2015). Uygulama alanı dikkate alındığında ise Global Fortune 250 firmalarının %95'inin sürdürülebilirlik raporu yayımladığı bilinmektedir (Carroll, 2015 (Minard, 2016). Kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk raporlarının da içinde olduğu sürdürülebilirlik raporları daha çok gönüllü bilgi ifşasını içerdiğinden bilgi asimetrisini azaltan raporlardır. ...
Article
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This study aims to investigate the effects of sustainability and corporate socialresponsibility on access to finance. In line with this purpose, data covering the years2014-2019 of 242 firms having required data and operating in BIST All Shares Indexwere used. According to findings, it has been found that being traded in the BISTSustainability Index, having corporate social responsibility committee and publishingcorporate social responsibility report eases access to finance. In addition, havingexternal assurance on corporate social responsibility reports has no significant effectson access to finance. These results have been also supported by additional analyses usingalternative proxies for access to finance. Bu çalışmada sürdürülebilirlik ve kurumsal sosyal sorumluğun firmaların finansmana erişimi üzerindeki etkileri incelenmiştir. Bu amaçla BIST Tüm Endekste işlem gören ve eksik verisi olmayan 242 firmanın 2014-2019 yıllarını kapsayan verileri kullanılmıştır. Elde edilen bulgulara göre firmaların BIST Sürdürülebilirlik Endeksinde işlem görmelerinin, kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk komitesine sahip olmalarının ve kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk raporu yayımlamalarının finansmana erişimi kolaylaştırdığı görülmüştür. Buna ek olarak, yayımlanan kurumsal sosyal sorumluluk raporlarına dış güvence hizmeti sağlanmasının finansmana erişim üzerinde anlamlı bir etkisinin olmadığı tespit edilmiştir. Sonuçlar firmaların finansmana erişiminin alternatif ölçüm yöntemleriyle de temsil edildiği ek analizlerden elde edilen bulgularla da desteklenmiştir.
... This range of practices raises questions as to how various types of companies address environmental issues, which policies and targets they settle upon, and which actions are undertaken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As Carroll (2021) and Latapí Agudelo et al. (2019) [30,31] stated in their literature reviews (examining the understanding of corporate social responsibility by academicians and professionals), there is limited research that provides an overview of the business practices that are actually undertaken by companies. Such an overview could provide insights for the design of net zero strategies and management of climate risks for companies seeking to meet sustainable development requirements, as well as helping to address the challenges related to climate change. ...
... Pressure has grown for strategies to be driven by socially responsible investment decisions, and to contribute to the goal of sustainable development. The term corporate social responsibility (CSR) is applied to the set of corporate practices and models that corporations adopt to reflect the interests of the diversified set of stake-holders, and the public in general (not least regarding environmental issues), is recognized, as CSR ideas have become the benchmark in assessing companies' roles in pursuing socially responsible business [30,60]. This concept leads companies to seek to align profit maximization with broader social goals [31]. ...
Article
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Digital Business Services (DBS), industries that have grown rapidly in recent years, played important roles in facilitating the adoption of digital technologies, as well as having applications in innovative products, transforming business processes across the economy. If DBS firms are committed to reducing negative environmental impacts, they should be able to make more positive contributions to their clients’ performance; for instance, promoting the digitalization of businesses process in ways that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and inefficient energy usage. But what are DBS business practices, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and related topics? This study examines the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) disclosures of leading companies providing consultancy, advertising/marketing, and information technology services. The plans, targets, and actions of DBS companies with above-average ESG scores, as indexed by the Refinitiv dataset, are examined. The results indicate that all of these firms express goals, and almost all of them have set clear targets, in terms of moving to net zero. A wide range of relevant activities is being implemented, including services that promote energy efficiency. The diversity of these actions suggests that these firms can learn from each other, and that companies with lower ESG ratings have models to emulate.
... The empirical literature divides CSR responsibilities into economic, humanitarian, and legal categories (Carroll, 1991). The economic dimension, which serves as the basis for others, entails that a firm's production should match market needs while also following profit generation (Carroll, 2015). The legitimate duties of a firm are to perform its activities within the boundaries and limits drawn by law (Wood, 1991). ...
... The ethical imperative entails ensuring that its manufacturing process and commodities are eco-friendly, clean, and non-toxic (McWilliams & Siegel, 2001). Humanitarian aspects highlight how businesses should respond through philanthropic activities, such as donating and developing public amenities (Carroll, 2015). In summary, companies that practice CSR should balance their financial gains and social requirements. ...
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Corporate involvement with social responsibility (CSR) is a voluntary practice. However, governments have recently adopted a more supportive stance by providing research and development support and tax exemptions. Therefore, this study examines the role of government subsidies (Sub) in CSR, considering the amount and number of subsidies and the type of industry in a competitive business environment. The paper establishes theoretical linkages through the construction of an oligopolistic market model of private enterprises based on industrial organisation theory's structure–conduct–performance (SCP) paradigm. Moreover, our study tests the empirical relationship using a dataset of 100 listed companies in Pakistan observed from 2011 to 2019 using robust standard error methodologies and a fixed effects IV estimator. The results show that government subsidies significantly promote private enterprises to actively fulfil their social responsibilities, and product market competition plays an intermediary role that endorses the theoretical proposition. This effect is visible at all stages of the enterprise's life cycle. Additionally, the relationship is more prominent in the case of low- and medium-sized government subsidies, competitive industries, and firms with no political connections. The results further reveal that product market competition is the primary channel through which government subsidies influence CSR. Concurrently, optimising the allocation of financial resources has specific significance.
... Se debe tener presente que la sostenibilidad se deriva del concepto de desarrollo sostenible (Bajo-Sanjuán, 2015;Carroll, 2015), y gana popularidad en 1987 en Nuestro Futuro Común, un Reporte de la Comisión Mundial sobre Medioambiente y Desarrollo (WCED, por su sigla en inglés de World Commission on Environment and Development), donde se definió como: "el desarrollo que satisface las necesidades de las presentes generaciones sin comprometer la capacidad de las futuras generaciones de satisfacer sus necesidades" (WCED, 1987, p. 16). ...
... Anteriormente, la sostenibilidad estaba relacionada con los temas medioambientales (Marrewijk, 2010a;Carroll, 2015); no obstante, en la actualidad aborda la inclusión de los aspectos sociales y ambientales en las actividades de los negocios y en las interacciones con las partes interesadas (Marrewijk, 2010a). ...
... For decades, studies devoted to discussing the influencing factors and implementation results in different industrial contexts noted that CSR was used as a strategic tool for companies to enhance their brand image and increase their competitive advantage, especially in industries such as automotive [40], food [41], oil [42], etc. CSR activities and disclosure were regular practices in large companies' operations [43,44], and they were essential to their brand strategy [45]. CSR's growing importance in business is closely related to social development [46]. Although the relationship between CSR and sustainable corporate development is still inconclusive [47], various research has already validated the strong relevance between CSR and corporate identity [48,49]. ...
... Sustainable development is crucial for the survival and long-term development of enterprises [46,68], and the diversity of sustainability concepts has influenced the discussion of their contributions to the sustainability of corporate activities [9,17]. Professional sport is more than just a social institution [7], and professionals believe that its commercial character entails the need to implement CSR [69,70]. ...
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The positive effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on professional sports organizations’ (PSO) sustainable development have been studied in developed markets, e.g., the major four leagues in North America. To assess if CSR has similar effects on the emerging market, this study collected 373 questionnaires among the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA) fans. The descriptive statistical results verified consumers’ positive responses to CSR in their favorite clubs in enhancing their team identification, loyalty, and purchase intentions of game tickets. There existed a strong relationship between team identifications and the clubs’ sustainable development. However, the results of the structural equation modelling indicated that the relationship between CSR and the clubs’ sustainable development was weak. The results indicated that fans generally considered a CBA team’s CSR effort as important, but the importance was not proportional to CSR-related team identification or the clubs’ sustainable development. Moreover, the lack of structural validity within each construct calls for more research frameworks and questionnaire designs for CSR investigations in the context of the emerging market. The practical implication of this study was that clubs with financial difficulties were only suggested to do what they could afford to do in CSR activities rather than get involved more than they could bear.
... Corporate Responsibility Management: The concept of corporate responsibility first appeared in the 1960s and is related to other concepts such as sustainability and corporate citizenship [1,25]. Corporate responsibility management as defined by the European Commission [26] is a process to manage an organization's social responsibility by integrating social, environmental, ethical, human rights, and consumer concerns into its business operations and core strategy in close collaboration with stakeholders, to (i) maximize the creation of shared value for shareholders, other stakeholders, and society at large, and (ii) identify, prevent, and mitigate possible adverse effects (cf., also [27]). ...
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The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the activities and performance of companies worldwide. This article examines in what ways corporate responsibility management and corporate responsibility reporting activities have changed during the COVID-19 crisis in Switzerland and Germany, and how corporate responsibility management is related to aspects of business resilience in terms of maintaining expected financial performance during the COVID-19 crisis in Swiss companies. To answer these questions, we conducted a quantitative and qualitative content analysis of company reports of the top 10 Swiss and German companies in terms of market capitalization, as well as a quantitative survey among Swiss managers. Our results show that during the period under consideration, (i) a majority of the companies analyzed in Switzerland and Germany expanded their sustainability reporting, both overall and in all sustainability dimensions; (ii) there is a tendency for corporate responsibility management to move away from upstream and downstream sustainability topics and focus more on in-house sustainability topics; and (iii) there is a correlation between the two corporate responsibility topics of local recruitment and occupational health and expected financial performance as an aspect of maintained business resilience in times of crisis.
... Já Dahan e Senol (2012), que vão na linha destes entendimentos, definem a responsabilidade social como o ativo responsável pelo estabelecimento de metas organizacionais compatíveis com o desenvolvimento da sociedade e como o mecanismo que facilita uma relação ética e transparente com todos os públicos envolvidos. E para Carroll (2015) a responsabilidade social significa que as organizações devem considerar o impacto das suas ações na sociedade, melhorando o seu bem-estar, mediante quatro dimensões principais: a ética dos negócios, a cidadania organizacional, a gestão dos stakeholders e a sustentabilidade. De acordo com esta perspetiva mais recente do autor, as organizações devem esforçar-se para atuar de acordo com um conjunto de valores morais impostos pela sociedade; necessitam de responder a um conjunto de direitos e deveres, para que sejam percebidas como legítimas; precisam de gerir os interesses de todos os públicos interessados; e, finalmente, de garantir as necessidades do pressente sem, contudo, sacrificar a capacidade das gerações futuras. ...
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Resumo As inovações tecnológicas têm sido responsáveis pela revolução da Comu-nicação Organizacional, já que trazem múltiplas possibilidades de contacto com os públicos em formatos de ampla difusão e grande rapidez. É, preci-samente, no contexto da utilização de uma tecnologia específica que esta investigação pretende focar-se, os websites, ao analisar a relevância da comu-nicação online na afirmação de um posicionamento estratégico em relação à responsabilidade social por parte das universidades públicas portuguesas. Para investigar este fenómeno, utilizou-se uma metodologia de carácter qualitativo, privilegiando-se a análise da arquitetura e conteúdo dos websites destas instituições. Os resultados deste estudo apontam para a existência de um posicionamento socialmente responsável nas universidades públicas estudadas, ainda que não necessariamente estratégico. Palavras-chave Websites; universidades públicas; posicionamento estratégico; extensão; responsabilidade social 1. inTrodução Apesar de os fundamentos da comunicação humana serem aplicá-veis a qualquer circunstância de interação, não se pode negar a revolução comunicacional impulsionada pelo aparecimento da internet. Com esta surgiram e foram-se multiplicando um conjunto de novas aplicações tecno-lógicas que representam, nomeadamente, desafios e oportunidades para a comunicação das organizações. E ainda que o, comumente usado, termo "novas" já não seja o prefixo mais adequado para a expressão "tecnolo-gias de comunicação", o estudo do fenómeno continua a ser pertinente,
... The act of stalking aims to reconcile damaged self-esteem and to feel better about the stalker's conduct. (2) The intimacy seeker usually lives a secluded existence which lacks close connection with others, and s/he usually has an introverted personality. The intimacy seeker desires a relationship with a person who has engaged his/her affection and already does, or will, reciprocate that love so the intimacy seeker is convinced despite obvious evidence to the contrary. ...
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Cyberstalking is practiced by Internet abusers to harass, victimize and to mock peers, teachers, co-workers, neighbors and others. While typically framed as an individual pursuit, we suggest that it can best be understood as a collective process, both as a result of internet users’ reliance on platforms and third-party services, as well as their engagements with other internet users engaged in related data practices, including doxing. We discuss the Amy Boyer tragedy, a well-known case that led to changes in law designed to better protect individual privacy. Subsequently, the paper discusses the responsibility of data companies within the broad business dimension of Internet companies. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is suggested as a model to follow. Ethical leaders are people who care about the greater good of their employees, organization, and society rather than their own self-interests.
... La sostenibilidad se deriva del concepto de desarrollo sostenible (Bajo-Sanjuán y Villagra- García, 2015;Carroll, 2015) y tiende a ser entendida como la incorporación de aspectos sociales y ambientales a la gestión de los negocios para satisfacer las demandas de los grupos de interés (Marrewijk, 2010). Las empresas que planifican una actuación efectiva orientada a la sostenibilidad deben delimitar su alcance en la estrategia y en las políticas organizacionales (Bajo-Sanjuán, 2016). ...
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En las últimas décadas es cada vez más frecuente la incorporación de los principios y aspectos relacionados con el desarrollo sostenible en los procesos, actividades y funciones de los negocios, así como su integración a los sistemas y modelos de gestión empresarial. La presente investigación propone una metodología para contribuir a la sostenibilidad de las organizaciones desde la gestión estratégica. La implementación de la metodología permite diagnosticar y diseñar el rumbo estratégico para la sostenibilidad, priorizar y clasificar procesos relevantes, diseñar programas de ética y de cumplimiento normativo sobre la base de los riesgos y los valores compartidos, contribuyendo a la mejora del nivel de sostenibilidad. Los resultados muestran una tendencia al aumento del nivel de sostenibilidad en la organización objeto de estudio, así como una mejora en el comportamiento de los factores críticos de éxito e indicadores al comparar los valores del periodo inicial con respecto al tercer periodo evaluado. En el caso de las dimensiones en la organización, la mejor evaluada es la económica; sin embargo, los resultados de las dimensiones social y ecológica presentan una situación menos favorable, por lo que futuras investigaciones deberán estar dirigidas a analizar estas dimensiones y generalizar esta investigación a otras organizaciones.
... Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become an integral part of contemporary business practices as stakeholders have increasingly expected socially responsible practices from organizations as part of a global push for sustainability in the economic, social, and environmental realms ever since the 1990s [1]. Corporate social advocacy (CSA), defined as corporate organizations taking active public stances regarding controversial social-political issues [2], has recently moved to the top of corporations' CSR agenda. ...
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This study examined corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication and pandemic responses of large corporations across multiple industries in a global context. Specifically, this research (1) described the state of CSR communication during the pandemic, and (2) identified how top global Fortune 500 corporations framed their COVID-19 pandemic responses as part of their social advocacy. An in-depth content analysis of the corporate communication messages revealed that top global corporations positioned their pandemic responses as an extension of their ongoing CSR commitment, prioritizing their philanthropic responsibilities over the ethical, legal, and economic responsibilities. They often relied on war metaphors, portraying the virus as the “common enemy” and employees as “heroes,” and highlighted their leadership role in the global “fight” against the pandemic as a “partner” of governments, “protector” of employees, and “supporter’’ of the communities. Analyzing a large data set from a global perspective, this study provides a comprehensive look at the state of CSR communication during the pandemic and demonstrates how corporations as authoritative societal actors help shape the ongoing discourse on the global COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the study makes several practical and theoretical contributions to sustainability research and our understanding of the evolving relationship between business and society.
... To him companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and interact with their stakeholders on voluntary basis. Corporate social responsibility concept is also seen as a social contract between organizations and the communities in which they operate according to [3,4]. CSR in Africa recently gained heightened interest due to high levels of inequalities and poverty among countries challenged with sustainable development [5,6]. ...
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Corporate social responsibility has been a subject of debate and of interest in most part of the world as a result of companies operational impacts on communities in which they operate. Over the years mining companies have embarked on specific payments as their corporate social responsibilities to improve conditions of people in their operational areas. In all these, beneficiary community's plight and needs must be decided in order for payments sustainability to be achieved. The impacts of these CSR payments on beneficiary communities as well as the companies themselves over the years have been diverse. In recent times there have been some agitations against mining companies by mining affected communities due to mining companies' failure to fulfil their corporate social responsibility obligations which affects companies' society-friendly and ethical relationship with the communities. It is on this note that the study sought to look at local communities' needs and corporate social responsibility payments in Birem North District in the Eastern region of Ghana. The study used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to gather the data. Chi square tests and cross tabulation analysis were employed in the data analysis. The study revealed that communities' ultimate needs include employment, educational health facilities, quality road networks, community library, teachers' quarters and portable drinking water. Also the ability of CSR payments to address community needs showed that more than half of community respondents believed payments have met communities' needs to a very small extent.
... The most vivid conceptualization of purpose by the executives we interviewed was in its contrast to CSR. Over the past 70 years, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility has been invested with a wide range of interpretations (Carroll 2015). Traditionally, however, CSR has not questioned the core organizational logic and has been criticised for adapting to the dominant logic of organizations instead of transforming them (Freeman and Liedtka 1991). ...
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This paper explores organizational purpose as a distinct, emerging, practitioner-led concept that places a specific meaningful motivation at the heart of organizations - even established for-profits. Using a discovery-orientated, theories-in-use approach, the authors identify organizational purpose as an organization’s meaningful and enduring reason to exist that aligns with long-term financial performance, provides a clear context for daily decision making, and unifies and motivates relevant stakeholders. Combining in-depth interviews with extant theory and supporting artefacts, the authors provide a robust description of the phenomenon, establish the concept’s uniqueness, identify antecedents and consequences, propose intervening conditions, and offer insights into how firms can develop an organizational purpose within their organizations. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the concept for research and practice.
... There is increasing concern in developed countries at the impact that economic activity is having on society. That concern translates into a greater commitment to society on the part of organizations, through initiatives in the fields of corporate social responsibility (Carroll, 2015;Schwartz, 2017) and, more recently, sustainability (ONU, 2015). More specifically, leading organizations have committed to shifting toward more inclusive business models and incorporating the creation of value for all stakeholders into their business management (Business Roundtable, 2019a,b). ...
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The first goal of this paper is to develop a theoretical and practical framework which can help to measure the emotional value generated by organizations in quantitative terms. Its second goal is to use data obtained from the UCAN (Union of Food and Agriculture Cooperatives of Navarre) in Spain as a case study to illustrate the quantification of the emotional value generated, with a view to factoring that value into a social accounting system. Ever greater recognition of the social role of organizations in recent years has led to a need for a consistent definition of the concept of socio-emotional value, and for instruments that can be used to measure that value in terms of generic social accounting. Taking the current lack of standardization in such models and instruments, especially those that deal with emotional value as its starting point, the paper proposes a new instrument for measuring that value quantitatively in such a way as to overcome some of the limitations of earlier proposals. The underlying perspective is that the monetary values identified in market and non-market transactions do not accurately account for all the value generated for different stakeholders, and that adjustments are required through a correction factor applied to the value variables identified. The quantification of the socio-emotional value generated by an organization is seen as a more comprehensive indicator of its performance, given that it provides more information and takes into account the value generated for stakeholders as a whole in all dimensions.
... The father of corporate social responsibility is considered to be Bowen [32], who theoretically established the concept of corporate social responsibility [33] when corporate social responsibility activities ceased to be seen as philanthropy but a firm's orientation toward values and goals with strong importance given to stakeholders' expectations. Expanding activism in the second half of the 20th century in the US gave rise to movements protecting women's rights, employee rights, human rights, and customer rights, as well as environmental movements leading to the stipulation of environmental CSR activities [34]. In the 1970s and 1980s, urban decay and pollution in the US created pressure to adopt environmental CSR activities as well as pressure to make companies disclose their CSR activities [35]. ...
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Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been a highly debated topic in recent years. The aim of this approach is to achieve sustainability through three basic pillars: the economic, social, and environmental. Today, corporate environmental responsibility is coming to the fore with the aim of solving global and regional environmental issues. An important aspect of the study was to identify the influence of the size of a company on the involvement in CSR. The results of the study suggest the potential impact of the legislative obligation to disclose non-financial information (CSR activities) on involvement in CSR, where only large companies have this obligation. No study has been conducted in the Slovak Republic on the impact of the size parameter of a company on CSR activities in the environmental area comparing small, medium, and large enterprises. The findings also indicate differences between the approach companies take to global and regional environmental issues, showing that companies are more involved with regional environmental issues. This paper adds to the literature on the issues of sustainability, corporate social behaviors, and the environmental access of companies of different sizes. The research showed the highest involvement in CSR activities in the field of ecology in large companies, which creates the need for further research with regard to possible legislative changes, with the possibility of extending the mandatory reports of CSR activities to small- and medium-sized enterprises.
... Nevertheless, CSR is an essential core of business and society scholarship (Carroll, 2015), and ultimately CSR is about the moral purpose of business and the proper relationship of businesses and societies (Business Roundtable, 2019). Thus, CSRM is the necessary product of CSR reasoning. ...
Article
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is about the moral purpose of business and its proper relationship to society. We map the logical structure of CSR—its canonical core—and identify the view of CSR that is most consistent with CSR as driven by moral purpose as Moral CSR ( CSRM). The numerous perspectives of CSR, which we term CSR memes, are complements to CSRM. A meme is an idea or usage diffusing within communities. Moral norms and what we term normatively injunctive warrants are implicit in many CSR memes but have received a relative lack of explicit and systematic attention. A norm is an accepted standard for behavior. A warrant is an authoritative or authorizing instruction for behavior. All CSR memes contain three elements—a corporate actor, a relation, and nonmoral normative warrants, which we term constructive warrants. We argue that any CSR meme should include a fourth element—moral normative (injunctive) warrants linking explicitly to moral reasoning. Through sorting key CSR memes by their epistemological and compositional characteristics, we reveal the paucity of explicit attention to injunctive warrants. We resort memes according to social gains or losses, which are the outcomes of societal demand for and business supply of CSR. This analysis yields two proposed improvements for CSR reasoning. The first is a clearer picture of variable use of the term CSR in extant research. The second is how scholars can incorporate more explicitly moral elements of CSR in future work.
... CSR, the stakeholder implementation theory and the extent of corporate governance, is a process to link social care, environment, ethics, human rights, and consumers into business activities and to optimize shared value with the owner and shareholders (Theodoulidis et al., 2017). In the past few years, corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a developed global concept (Carroll, 2015). CSR symbolizes many world wellknown perspectives and has significantly developed. ...
Article
This research examines the link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and ownership structure on firm value to encourage sustainability of the banking industry in Indonesia. The study uses the Kinder, Lydenberg, and Domini’s (KLD) assessment to evaluate CSR in the banking sector in Indonesia, and further, it uses economic value added to assess a firm’s value. This research studied 37 banks in Indonesia from 2013 to 2018. The research model employed weighted least square panel tests. Results reveal that the CSR influence is significantly positive for firm value. However, other ownership structures that have a similar effect on firm value are government ownership and foreign institutional ownership. The results further indicate that CSR can be a means of communication and can form a part of a bank’s strategy to enhance value, especially the elements of diversity, environment, and products. Moreover, this research finding provides decision-makers with in-depth knowledge regarding the beneficial effects of ownership structure on company value. The study develops the results from previous studies by discussing each component of CSR performance in the KLD and determines that each component has a varying effect on firm value.
... According to the agency theory of free cash flow, slack resources give rise to agency problems where managers misuse the spare resources for their own benefits. Carroll (2015) describes CSR as the investment that managers undertake not only to protect and improve the welfare of the society but also to further their own/business' interests, that is, it is more about the public relations, media campaigns, and glossy CSR reports rather than a genuine effort to solve a problem (Jauernig & Valentinov, 2019). Thus, the availability of slack resources may encourage "bad" managers to overinvest in CSR (Hinze & Sump, 2019) or to engage in initiatives that do not meet the CSR objectives of the firm (Browne & Nuttall, 2013). ...
Article
Drawing on slack resources and institutional theories, this study tests the links between liquidity, corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy, and CSR performance. The results indicate differential effects of liquidity measures on CSR investment. CSR committee and executive CSR compensation individually are significant drivers of higher CSR performance. Moderation analysis to test the interaction effect of liquidity measurements with the CSR committee on CSR performance yields mixed outcomes. Similarly, a second moderation analysis conducted to test the interaction of liquidity measurements with executive CSR compensation on CSR performance produces mixed results. Hence, the results are metric sensitive in terms of liquidity measurements.
... O debate sobre a Responsabilidade Social nas organizações encontra a sua origem na segunda metade do século XX (Garriga & Melè, 2004). Na linha deste entendimento Carroll (2015) afirma que a Responsabilidade Social é um produto do Pós Segunda Guerra Mundial e foi resultado de mudanças na consciência social, que cresceu nos anos 60. Na verdade, as organizações não operam num ambiente isolado e a sua atividade afeta um conjunto de grupos internos e externos, bem como, a comunidade que com ela está envolvida (Nejati, Shafaei, Salamzadeh & Daraei, 2011), e estes exigem que as empresas e instituições atuem de forma transparente e responsável (Vasilescu, Barna, Epure & Baicu, 2010). ...
Conference Paper
Resumo O presente estudo procura compreender qual o estado da Comunicação Es-tratégica nas universidades públicas em Portugal e qual a sua relevância para o cumprimento da missão social destas instituições. Assim, a pergunta de partida que orienta este trabalho é: é a Comunicação Estratégica relevante para o alcance da Missão das universidades públicas portuguesas, em particular da sua extensão à sociedade? Os resultados obtidos apontam para uma resposta afirmativa e para uma relação de interdependência entre Co-municação Estratégica e Responsabilidade Social. Palavras-chave Comunicação Estratégica; universidades públicas; missão; Responsabilidade Social inTrodução Comunicação Estratégica, Missão Organizacional, Responsabilidade Social e Universidades Públicas Portuguesas constituem os elementos fun-damentais deste trabalho. O que se pretende é averiguar o uso institucional da Comunicação Estratégica pelas instituições de ensino superior, como modelo capaz de dar resposta à missão social das universidades públicas portuguesas. O interesse em abordar esta questão surgiu da perceção de dois fe-nómenos relevantes: por um lado, nas últimas duas décadas a gestão da comunicação tem conquistado espaço e relevância nas instituições de en-sino superior portuguesas; por outro, existe uma pressão, crescente, so-bre estas organizações, para que se concentrem na transferência do seu
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Using a real-life business case of an airline, this case study demonstrates how exemplary leadership emancipates employees and accelerates employee agility to better serve customers, especially when there is an unprecedent call for discharging corporate social responsibility (CSR). During the height of the COVID19 pandemic in early 2020, the national carrier of a South Asian nation executed a CSR strategy which illustrates a humanitarian project of a commercial airline. The airline confronted with a challenge of rescuing 33 citizens, who were helplessly trapped in Wuhan, where the world’s first COVID19 lockdown was reported, isolating the city from the rest of the world. The chief pilot of the crew sets an example as a leader by volunteering to take part in the rescue mission. The front-line employees of the airline were motivated. This inculcates an authentic and committed feeling of shared responsibility among the employees. The employee agility gained through the strategic intervention made them come forward, to accomplish the humanitarian mission. The carrier, struggling to stay afloat due to volatile industry conditions, successfully accomplished the rescue mission. The operation was far from a normal flight. Showing solidarity and humanity during a time of unprecedented need, risking their own lives, to bring 33 fellow human beings to safety, the crew earned the admiration of those rescued and the wider community. Execution of CSR strategy in response to a crisis requires employee agility, resilience, and altruism. To this end, strategic leadership teams should demonstrate exemplary leadership style to reinforce socially responsible employee behaviour. Unpreceded crisis situations require unprecedent CSR strategies. When implemented successfully they often ensure gaining social legitimacy bridging the gap between internal and external marketing nexus of CSR space and addressing the tension between altruistic and strategic CSR.
Article
The article proves the need and possibility to determine the macroeconomic effect of corporate social responsibility. The need for research is due to the gradual establishment of post-capitalist relations in society. This changes the system of interaction between business, society and the state. At the same time, it is taken into account that the systemic transformation is accompanied by deepening asymmetries and crisis phenomena in the world economy, increasing risks and challenges to society. This also leads to the need of the determination of the macroeconomic effect of corporate social responsibility. The possibility of determining the specified macroeconomic effect is provided by the analysis methodology for generalizing the results of rationing for three indicators reflecting the components of sustainable development (social sphere, economy and ecology). This allows to determine the average index of compliance of the country with the requirements of sustainable development. Thus, the basic principles of understanding the corporate social responsibility policy, the result of which is manifested at the national level, are considered in the context of the interrelation with the content of the sustainable development concept. The theoretical and methodological principles of this research area are consistent with the requirements of the new economic reality, which is increasingly acquiring the signs of post-capitalism. The methodology that guarantees the determination of the macroeconomic effect of corporate social responsibility is proposed. The proposed methodology is applied to clarify the international status of Ukraine regarding the compliance of the country’s development with the goals of sustainable development with the projection of processes occurring in society on the consumption sphere (taking into account the reaction of consumers to business behavior). Aggregation of standardized values (Ukraine to the number of countries in the ratings) made it possible to assess the country’s position, to adjust it for the indicator of the country’s development compliance with the principles of sustainable development, and to take into account the market reaction to business behavior (consumer confidence when making purchases). Keywords: sustainable development, corporate social responsibility, macroeconomic system, macroeconomic effect of corporate social responsibility, post-capitalism. JEL Classification B41, F20, M14 Formulas: 3; fig.: 0; tabl.: 4; bibl.: 31.
Article
La Agenda 2030 trae consigo una serie de objetivos encaminados al logro del desarrollo sostenible, dentro de estos se enmarca la importancia de las empresas para generar cambios en este rubro, ya que poseen la capacidad de transformar a su entorno utilizando la gestión estratégica como herramienta clave, la cual, para ser usada eficazmente, debe de conciliar tanto las necesidades de las empresas como de la sociedad. La presente investigación es de tipo descriptivo basado en fuentes documentales con un método deductivo de abordaje hermenéutico, en razón de que se efectuaron revisiones a las teorías de Responsabilidad Social Empresarial (RSE), Stakeholders y Sostenibilidad Empresarial como fuentes para el análisis de la gestión en la materia, las cuales, se sometieron a interpretación con el objetivo de llegar al planteamiento de su conceptualización integral que proporcione un bosquejo general de las partes involucradas, y donde se reconozca la divergencia entre las metas empresariales y las que la sociedad demanda, y al hacer esto trabajar en conjunto para reconciliar y abordar exitosamente a la sostenibilidad. Con esto se espera aportar bases teórico-conceptuales que permitan el desarrollo de futuras investigaciones.
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The relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and leadership has received considerable research attention in recent decades. While there have been several qualitative reviews, quantitative and systematic reviews of CSR–leadership links remain absent. The current paper seeks to address this gap by using a bibliometric method to analyze and visualize the evolution and research trends within the CSR–leadership domain. Drawing from a sample of 1432 peer-reviewed articles, we map the landscape of the CSR–leadership research domain and identify key developments and patterns over the period 1994–2020. In addition to highlighting a range of publication trends including key theoretical influences, the findings also reveal an acceleration in the volume and breadth of CSR–leadership research. Seven subdomains (or clusters) are further identified (i.e., board characteristics, responsible leadership, emerging country context, team efficacy, CEO pay fairness, shareholder wealth, and cross-sector social partnership) and discussed based on the keywords using the log-likelihood ratio clustering algorithm. The analysis is further divided into three stages: namely, the initial stage (1991–2003), the rapid development stage (2004–2011), and the maturation stage (2012–present). These stages are used to present more fine-grained insights into the research patterns over time. We conclude by discussing implications of the bibliometric analysis and presenting several opportunities for future research.
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Corporate social responsibility, as a business philosophy and managerial concept, is increasingly represented in contemporary business operations and marketing, as well as in the scientific literature in this field. The importance that consumers attach to different aspects of social responsibility when evaluating companies and products and making purchasing decisions, is determined by economic, sociological, institutional and technological development of the environment, differing in developed countries and emerging markets. The aim of this paper is to investigate how consumers perceive the responsibility of companies operating in the market of the Republic of Serbia and which aspects of social responsibility they perceive as crucial or more important. In order to examine how consumers perceive the social and environmental dimensions of corporate social responsibility, an empirical study was conducted, using the survey method. For the purposes of the research, the questionnaire was adapted from the similar studies in foreign countries, which enables a comparison of the importance of different dimensions of corporate responsibility with consumers from different markets. In addition to standard demographic questions, the questionnaire also contains questions related to different perception, beliefs and attitudes, as well as expectations of respondents' in relation to the social and environmental dimension of company responsibility. The results of the research showed that there is a significant correlation between the perception of environmental and social aspects of corporate social responsibility and consumer preferences, expressed in company's evaluation and intention to buy its products or services. One of the conclusions of the survey is that demographic characteristics of respondents determine this connection.
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This chapter concentrates on theoretical insights regarding corporate transition and commitment to sustainability and social responsibility. Initially, considering that the concept of CSR is dynamic and acquires new shapes and facets which reflect the maturity of the society, the historical evolution of CSR is described and variety of CSR definitions is presented. Next, as CSR has its roots in the stakeholder theory, the general review of stakeholder theory is provided and four stakeholder groups, namely employees, potential employees, customers in B2B context, and consumers are briefly described. Then, CSR transitions are analysed as long-term changes that are multi-dimensional and fundamental transformations of organisational systems towards more sustainable patterns of productions and consumption. Finally, the scientific literature is advised for the drivers and tensions of sustainability transitions followed by a discussion.
Article
Social responsibility is a common part of corporate practice and an established topic of scientific research. Foreign studies have repeatedly concluded that the consistent integration of social responsibility into corporate strategy and strategic management of all dimensions of CSR strengthen corporate growth, bring competitive advantages, and contribute to the sustainable development of society. The aim of the paper is to find out whether even in the Czech Republic business entities with a strategic concept of CSR achieve better economic results compared to those whose approach to social responsibility is rather intuitive and unsystematic. Also, it seeks to answer the question of whether, with different corporate strategies, it is desirable to focus on different CSR activities that would support corporate growth. A survey of the dimensions of strategic CSR and basic economic characteristics was carried out on a set of more than 400 Czech companies engaged in CSR. Data were processed by methods of cluster analysis, factor analysis and multinomial logistic regression. The results show that there is a link between a more advanced (i.e., strategic) concept of CSR and achieving economic prosperity. It was also found that companies with different corporate strategies should carefully consider the benefits of individual CSR activities. All three strategies have shown positive effects resulting from activities aimed at employees and the local community. The differentiation strategy has shown the benefits of cultivating a market environment and the highest quality strategy for human rights protection. On the other hand, with the lowest price strategy, additional CSR activity does not mean an economic advantage. The conclusions contribute to the clarification of the links between strategic CSR and corporate growth in the Czech business environment and contribute specific knowledge that can be implemented by companies if they want to strengthen the positive effects of their socially responsible activities.
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Corporate social responsibility (CSR) represents the voluntary commitment of companies to behave appropriately, fairly, and responsibly with the environment in which they operate. It refers to a business approach that takes into account economic, environmental, and social issues in a balanced, holistic, and long-term manner for the benefit of current and future stakeholders. Thus, since the introduction of the concept, more managers are including social and environmental objectives in their decision-making process. The aim of CSR is therefore to seek the well-being of society and the environment through business activities. However, when did the term come into being, how has the term evolved since its foundation, and how has the concept of CSR evolved over time? Through a narrative review of the literature, the research addresses these research questions to bring clarity to the field of study.
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Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly seen as a key aspect of business management. The rapid spatial spread of the COVID-19 outbreak led to border closures and mandatory mass quarantine. In this context, sectors such as the hospitality industry have been actively involved in various CSR activities, providing infrastructure and resources to help governments and societies cope with the pandemic. This study examines the different effects of CSR activities in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, both from a business and institutional perspective. A qualitative research design has been chosen for this purpose, based on the analysis of in-depth qualitative interviews with the CEO and senior executives of three international hotel chains in Spain. The results reveal that CSR activities have contributed to containing the pandemic by helping to reduce the collapse of healthcare, as well as improving the organization’s performance in terms of reputation and image.KeywordsCrisis managementHotel chainsDisaster reliefStakeholder commitment
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To remain sustainably viable in today's business environment, employers require appropriate skills to support their commitment to social responsibility. When recruiting skills, employers recognize that graduate attributes are essential indicators of the capability to render constructive workplace outcomes. Graduates need to develop these attributes to demonstrate their employability potential to prospective employers. However, existing employability capital frameworks do not include the graduate attributes needed to measure capability in corporate social responsibility (CSR) skills. The objective of this study was to determine which graduate attributes would support employability capability in CSR skills. Following a theoretical investigation, a mixed‐method exploratory study was undertaken in South Africa's state‐owned electricity provider to determine the employability attributes required by the organization in CSR management. The first phase involved a data collection survey, 302 managers and supervisors in South Africa's primary electricity provider rated a proposed 44 personal attributes linked to nine theoretical determined CSR skills and their importance in CSR management. In the second phase, the survey results were validated through a separate Delphi technique with three Human Resource Development experts. Confirmatory factor analysis found significant relationships between the tested attributes and the nine CSR skills. The findings could assist graduates in understanding the attributes they need to develop to be deemed employable for CSR performance. Furthermore, higher education institutions can include the results in curriculums to contribute to the development of CSR skills. Finally, the attributes and skills could be used to conceptualize a focused CSR employability capital, which employers can use to test employability potential.
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This study centered on corporate social responsibility and customer patronage in the telecommunications context. It was conducted to examine the effects of community development, corporate philanthropy, environmental responsibility, legal responsibility and ethical responsibility on customer patronage of telecommunication services. The study adopted survey research design. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain primary data from 246 telecommunication service subscribers. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics while hypotheses testing was carried out using multiple linear regression. The findings of the study revealed that corporate philanthropy (β = .444; p-value = 0.000 < 0.05) had the highest significant positive influence on customer patronage of telecommunication services, followed in order of relative importance by environmental responsibility (β = .384; p-value = 0.003 < 0.05), community development (β = .352; p-value = 0.000 < 0.05), ethical responsibility (β = .301; p-value = 0.000 < 0.05) and legal responsibility (β = .210; p-value = 0.001 < 0.05). On the basis of these findings, therefore, the study provided practical implications for possible implementation.
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Corporate Social Responsibility is one of the most studied themes over the last decades, both at organizational and at academic levels. It has assumed a very relevant role in companies because the goal is to increase the quality of life of the employees, the organization as a whole, and the communities, improving the current socioeconomic scenarios. In the present chapter is carried out one analysis descriptive of practices of Responsibility Social Corporate (RSC) existing in the Association of Pensioners, Pensioners and Elderly Flower of Lavender, institution private of Solidarity Social the County of Sintra. Thus, the purpose of this work is to analyze the perception of the employees, in that it relates to their practice of Responsibility Social through the method of study of the case. In the theoretical review, the concept of IPSS is approached, the evolution of the concept of CSR, and some conceptual models observed in the academic literature are presented. Then, some public SR policies are identified. Preliminary results suggest that, in general, social solidarity institutions are engaging in their public policy strategies for Social Responsibility.
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I present a structural empirical model of collective household labour supply that includes the non-participation decision. I specify a simultaneous model for hours, participation and wages of husband and wife. I discuss the problems of identification and statistical coherency that arise in the application of the collective household labour supply model. The model includes random effects and it is estimated using a panel data set of Dutch couples. The estimates allow me to check the underlying regularity conditions on individual preferences and to obtain estimates of the sharing rule that governs the division of household income between husband and wife. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2009.
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The authors review the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature based on 588 journal articles and 102 books and book chapters. They offer a multilevel and multidisciplinary theoretical framework that synthesizes and integrates the literature at the institutional, organizational, and individual levels of analysis. The framework includes reactive and proactive predictors of CSR actions and policies and the outcomes of such actions and policies, which they classify as primarily affecting internal (i.e., internal outcomes) or external (i.e., external outcomes) stakeholders. The framework includes variables that explain underlying mechanisms (i.e., relationship- and value-based mediator variables) of CSR–outcomes relationships and contingency effects (i.e., people-, place-, price-, and profile-based moderator variables) that explain conditions under which the relationship between CSR and its outcomes change. The authors’ review reveals important knowledge gaps related to the adoption of different theoretical orientations by researchers studying CSR at different levels of analysis, the need to understand underlying mechanisms linking CSR with outcomes, the need for research at micro levels of analysis (i.e., individuals and teams), and the need for methodological approaches that will help address these substantive knowledge gaps. Accordingly, they offer a detailed research agenda for the future, based on a multilevel perspective that aims to integrate diverse theoretical frameworks as well as develop an understanding of underlying mechanisms and microfoundations of CSR (i.e., foundations based on individual action and interactions). The authors also provide specific suggestions regarding research design, measurement, and data-analytic approaches that will be instrumental in carrying out their proposed research agenda.
which won the 2014 Best Book Award in the Academy of Management's Social Issues in Management Division. He is a fellow of the Academy of Management
  • B Archie
Archie B. Carroll is professor emeritus of management in the Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, where he served on the faculty 40 years (33 full time + 7 part-time). He is co-author of Business and Society: Ethics, Sustainability, and Stakeholder Management, 9th edition, 2015, with Ann K. Buchholtz of the Rutgers University Business School. In 2012, he was awarded the first Lifetime Achievement Award in Corporate Social Responsibility by the Institute of Management, Humboldt University--Berlin, Germany. He is co-author of Corporate Responsibility: The American Experience (Cambridge University Press, 2012), which won the 2014 Best Book Award in the Academy of Management's Social Issues in Management Division. He is a fellow of the Academy of Management, International Association for Business & Society, and the Southern Management Association (Department of Management, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. e-mail: acarroll@uga.edu).