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Group Work: A Way towards Enhancing Quality Learning

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Abstract

Nowadays in the language teaching classrooms, the major concern of the teachers is to engage the learners in the classroom learning procedure and as a consequence, collaborative language learning is being prioritized day by day. Hence, group work is being used in the language classrooms to foster students’ engagement and involvement and thus to enhance quality participation of the learners. In this respect, the purposes of this paper are to find out whether group work can help the students to actively take part in the learning process as well as to investigate whether the teacher can manage the group work successfully. Therefore, this paper aims to explore (through a case study) whether the rationales behind group work execute as true in the classroom practice.

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Reimpresión en 2001 Incluye bibliografía e índice
Productive Group Work The practice of English language teaching
  • N Frey
  • D Fisher
  • S Everlove
Frey, N., Fisher, D., & Everlove, S., (2009). Productive Group Work. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/109018/chapters/Defining-Productive-Group-Work.aspx Harmer, J. (2001). The practice of English language teaching. London: Longman.
Productive Group Work
  • N Frey
  • D Fisher
  • S Everlove
Frey, N., Fisher, D., & Everlove, S., (2009). Productive Group Work. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/109018/chapters/Defining-Productive-Group-Work.aspx