ArticlePDF Available

A Critical Review of Research on Design Education Focusing on Creativity in Architectural Design

Authors:

Abstract

Background: During the last decade a considerable amount of research on creativity enhancement has been undertaken within the design education. It is essential to establish an educational platform which encourages students’ creative thinking. This paper aims to review mainstream studies undertaken between 2003 and 2012, to identify the research concentration and paucity and to propose important issues to be considered in future design education. Methods: From 10 domestic design journals and 7 international design journals, through three steps of selection procedure, a total of 61 articles related to creativity enhancements in design education were selected and classified according to their key contents and target areas. Results: The studies were categorized into three main categories: design education method, idea conception and development, and design strategy. Each category is divided into sub-categories such as the application of theories in design education, design curriculum, stimulation elements etc. Compare to domestic research, international research has more various perspectives and approaches to design education studies. Conclusion: Through the result of this research, we found that more systematic research frameworks need to be developed and reasoning techniques are critical to the creative thinking in design. This research can be a basis for the future research direction emphasizing creativity enhancement in design education.
A preview of the PDF is not available
Article
Full-text available
Representing visual experiences is an essential part of architectural design education for creativity. The representation of creative ideas relates to the ability to communicate spatial design concepts. This study examined whether filmic spaces could function as visual communication to enhance students’ creative thinking in architecture. It explored how creativity can be supported throughout an architectural design studio with a conceptual tool that translates filmic spaces into spatial design. To investigate the ways to translate filmic space into spatial design tools for creative thinking, we conducted a design studio with first-year university students. Focusing on using various elements of film, including movement, frame, montage, light, and color, and scene changes to represent architectural languages, a curriculum was developed and implemented in a Visual Communication Design Studio for one semester, stimulating students to engage in expressing their ideas in three-dimensional spaces. The overall results suggested that the design education method that used the filmic space as a stimulating tool for creative thinking, emphasizing the role of visual communication, could enhance students’ creative thinking, leading to improved creative design processes.
Article
The purpose of this study is to analyze the trend of spatial design education focusing on creativity based on design process. In this research, the theoretical frame of design process focused on creativity was organized and the trend of creativity education study in the spatial design and other design sectors was compared and analyzed. As a result of the research, the creativity education study of spatial design analyzed such a result showed the relatively low frequency, many of studies related to formative expression of idea. On the contrary, the creativity education of other design sectors is related to overall process the most, the major contents were represented as a creativity enhancement eduction through the conversion with other sectors, the utilization of study method and theology and the utilization of IT technology. The result of this study suggests that more various attempts are required for the spatial design education and that the attempts should orient the conversion between science and art, humanity and science and the integrated access of digital and analogue.
Article
This research sought to examine whether analogical and metaphorical reasoning could be taught as a teaching strategy to enhance students’ creative thinking in the design process. To investigate the effects of analogical and metaphorical reasoning in design thinking, research was conducted with second year university students majoring in interior architecture. First, a pilot study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of analogical and metaphorical reasoning in supporting design thinking. Based on the results of the pilot study, a curriculum was developed and implemented in a studio course for one semester that encouraged students to engage in analogical and metaphorical reasoning. A further experiment was conducted to validate the effects of the curriculum on students’ design thinking processes. The overall results suggested that a teaching strategy that emphasises the use of analogical and metaphorical reasoning could enhance students’ design thinking and lead to more creative design processes.
Article
Over the course of the last half century, numerous training programs intended to develop creativity capacities have been proposed. In this study, a quantitative meta-analysis of program evaluation efforts was conducted. Based on 70 prior studies, it was found that well-designed creativity training programs typically induce gaïns in performance with these effects generalizing across criteria, settings, and target populations. Moreover, these effects held when internal validity considerations were taken into account. An examination of the factors contributing to the relative effectiveness of these training programs indicated that more successful programs were likely to focus on development of cognitive skills and the heuristics involved in skill application, using realistic exercises appropriate to the domain at hand. The implications of these observations for the development of creativity through educational and training interventions are discussed along with directions for future research.
Article
The architectural design studio is an anomaly in the contemporary research university. Its underlying theories of professional knowledge and teaching are at odds with those of other university-based professional schools. This represents an opportunity: the studio has much to teach other professional schools on the basis of its traditions of education through coaching and learning-by-doing. On the other hand, what is the place of applied science in the studio? This question triggers a more general issue about science education for the professions. I have suggested how teaching what scientists do, rather than their research results, could influence science teaching in the studio. When considered this way, scientific research and architectural design bear a much closer family resemblance to each other.
Article
This paper defines and describes entrepreneurial creativity, which is the generation and implementation of novel, appropriate ideas to establish a new venture. Entrepreneurial creativity can be exhibited in established organizations as well as in start-up firms. The central thesis of this paper is that entrepreneurial creativity requires a combination of intrinsic motivation and certain kinds of extrinsic motivation — a motivational synergy that results when strong levels of personal interest and involvement are combined with the promise of rewards that confirm competence, support skill development, and enable future achievement.
Article
Creativity, which is concerned with problem solving, is essential if we are to generate new solutions to the massive and complex problems in the unknown future. Our next generation needs an educational platform where they can be taught to possess creativity. Design education is such a way to foster students’ creativity. Therefore, it is essential to understand the creative design process and its routine in order to show how students can generate creative output and how teachers can guide students in the design process. Consequently, the aim of this paper is to investigate the creative design process as it is employed in producing creative designs, and further recommend how students can practise and learn to be creative based on the model process developed in this paper. The model is expected to provide a guideline for teachers to facilitate students along the creative thinking process.
Article
This is the third paper in a series being published in Design Studies, which aims to establish the theoretical bases for treating design as a coherent discipline of study. The first contribution in the series was from Bruce Archer, in the very first issue of Design Studies, and the second was from Gerald Nadler, in Vol 1, No 5. Further contributions are invited.Here, Higel Cross takes up the arguments for a ‘third area’ of education—design—that were outlined by Archer. He further defines this area by contrasting it with the other two—sciences and humanities—and goes on to consider the criteria which design must satisfy to be acceptable as a part of general education. Such an acceptance must imply a reorientation from the instrumental aims of conventional design education, towards intrinsic values. These values derive from the ‘designerly ways of knowing’. Because of a common concern with these fundamental ‘ways of knowing’, both design research and design education are contributing to the development of design as a discipline.
Article
REPORTS ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE STUDY OF CREATIVITY. BEGINNING WITH GALTON'S STUDIES ON THE IMPACT OF HEREDITY UPON GENIUS, GUILFORD POINTS OUT THAT RELATIVELY FEW PSYCHOLOGISTS HAVE TURNED THEIR ATTENTION TO THIS PROBLEM. ONLY THOSE WHO HAVE A PARTICULAR INTEREST IN THE MEASUREMENT OF INTELLECTUAL CAPACITY HAVE BEEN UNABLE TO AVOID CONTACT WITH THE CREATIVE ASPECT OF MAN BUT THE HISTORY OF THE INTELLIGENCE TEST MOVEMENT SHOWS THAT IN ITS EARLY DEVELOPMENT IT HAS BEEN SINGULARLY DEVOID OF CONTACT WITH MEASURES OF INGENUITY, INNOVATIVE CAPACITY, OR INVENTIVENESS. SOME NONPSYCHOLOGICAL ATTEMPTS AT ATTACKING THE PROBLEM OF CREATIVITY ARE DISCUSSED. SINCE 1950 EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH THE NATURE OF CREATIVITY HAVE BEEN SOMEWHAT MORE FRUITFUL AND THE PROMISE OF MORE EFFECTIVE BASIC RESEARCH ON CREATIVE THINKING IS DISCUSSED. (32 REF.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
There is a feeling among many design educators today that the discipline has reached a crisis in its development, and that change is needed immediately in the way that design educators articulate their epistemology and their methodology. The architectural studio can be seen as the model for design education, and its culture is exemplary. Donald Schön has often argued that the professional education of architectural students – and other design students – should be aimed at making them into ‘reflective practitioners’. At the core of his argument is the idea that design education must sacrifice intellectual rigour in order to achieve social relevance, yet critics have argued that this trade-off has caused design education to be marginalised in relation to the university model of education. Design is focused on subjective creativity, but the positivist university paradigm is focused on objective rationality. In order for design education to become more rigorous – and more academically respectable – it must either become more rational or it must embrace a new paradigm that values creative experience. This article argues that the emerging paradigm of complexity offers design education the rigour it has been lacking, for this paradigm constructs studio projects not as problems with rational solutions but as systems that need to be explored in order to discover their relational meanings and values – precisely what creativity, balanced with rationality, can accomplish in both Western nations and rapidly developing East Asian nations such as China.