New Directions in Human Trafficking Research

Article (PDF Available)inThe Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 653(May) · May 2014with 294 Reads
DOI: 10.1177/0002716214521562
Abstract
This article evaluates four popular claims regarding human trafficking's international magnitude, trends, and seriousness relative to other illicit global activities. I find that the claims are neither evidence-based nor verifiable. Second, an argument is made for carefully conducted microlevel research on trafficking. Several such studies are described, including the contributions to this volume of The Annals. I argue for microlevel research, which has advantages over grand, macrolevel claimsadvantages that are both quantitative (i.e., identifying the magnitude of trafficking within a measurable context) and qualitative (i.e., documenting complexities in lived experiences)and is better suited to formulating contextually appropriate policy and enforcement responses.
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