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The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility

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Abstract

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies can be re-conceived strategically to confer competitive advantage as implied by the proponents of the ‘shared value’ notion. A qualitative research involved in-depth, semi structured interview questions that explored eco-certified accommodation establishments’ ethos for responsible behaviors. The findings have indicated that discretionary spending in socially and environmentally-sound initiatives have led to improved stakeholder relationships, effective human resources management, better market standing, operational efficiencies and cost savings, along with other benefits.
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... It may indicate that certain employees are not engaging in responsible food preparation behaviors. There is scope for hospitality businesses to train their human resources, at all levels, particularly new employees, on circular economy approaches [73,74]. In this way, they will be in a better position to improve their efficiencies in terms of reducing, reusing, and recycling resources, and responsible waste disposal practices. ...
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Although previous researchers have explored the circular economy practices of different businesses in various contexts, currently, there are still a few contributions that are focused on the sustainable preparation and consumption of food in the tourism and hospitality industry context. Hence, this paper sheds light on case studies from hotels, restaurants, and cafes that are located in urban tourist destinations. This research suggests that catering businesses can implement a number of responsible initiatives by introducing preventative measures and recycling practices to curb food loss and the generation of waste. In conclusion, this contribution implies that there is scope for regulatory authorities and policymakers to encourage hospitality practitioners to engage in circular economy approaches and to incentivize them to minimize food waste in tourism cities.
... For example, non-governmental organizations can raise awareness about political, social and environmental issues. Businesses can use social media to communicate about their corporate social (and environmental) responsibility (CSR), corporate governance, responsible procurement, philanthropic and stewardship practices, et cetera, in different markets (Troise & Camilleri, 2020;Weder, Einwiller & Eberwein, 2019;Camilleri, 2019bCamilleri, , 2017bCamilleri, , 2016a2015; Mendes-da-Silva, Christensen & Richardson, 2008;Fombrun, 2005). These online networks are also effective monitoring tools. ...
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Institutions and organizations are increasingly using the digital media to communicate with stakeholders on a day-to-day basis and during crises situations. Therefore, this chapter presents a bibliographic analysis on digital corporate communication technologies. The grounded theory's inductive approach was used to capture and interpret the findings from Scopus-indexed publications. The articles were scrutinized in their entirety, including their research questions, methodologies and interpretation of the findings. Afterwards, this contribution identifies the opportunities and challenges that emerged during an unprecedented Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. In conclusion, it implies that there is scope for institutions and organizations to incorporate digital and social media in their crises' communications and risk management plans. This will enable them to be in a better position to engage in credible and transparent dialogic communications with different stakeholders.
... about Ethics and CSR (Hornsby et al., 1994;Fassin, 2008;Fassin et al., 2011). However, more research is needed regarding the relationship between SME engagement in CSR and the SME profitability and competitiveness (Jamali et al., 2015) and some authors have explored into that matter for certain kind of enterprises (Camilleri, 2015). Recently, some studies have been conducted to assess the elements which may have influence in establishing an ethical infrastructure in SMEs (Fernandez & Camacho, 2016). ...
... Corporate responsibility can be a means by which companies can better understand and manage their risk and comprehending the needs and expectations of stakeholders can be an integral aspect of risk assessments (Keeble & Turner, 2003). Speaking of South Africa, de Jongh ((2004, p. 29) states that there is "a fundamental 'new order of doing business' … which ultimately requires original and unconventional strategies to develop riskcontrol measures required to manage the new order of risks". ...
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Stakeholder demands and the introduction of the ‘triple bottom line’ as a means of reporting corporate performance, make it critical that South African companies assess why they should undertake corporate responsibility initiatives. This exploratory study (part two of a two-part study) investigated the issues that are being or should be addressed by companies under the banner of corporate responsibility and the reasons for this. The views of a convenience snowball sample of consultants, academics and practitioners of corporate responsibility, was gained by means of a Delphi technique. Content analysis was employed to categorise the views into themes. The findings indicate the need for corporate responsibility action in the areas of ecology, the environment, health and well-being, building human capital and in the encouragement of economic development. Cost benefit and defensive arguments dominate the case for corporate responsibility. There is little indication that organisations have identified the opportunity of corporate responsibility initiatives to increase innovation and organisational learning and its contribution to risk management. Recommendations are made regarding the assessment of investment in this area.
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The article is devoted to defining the concept of corporate social responsibility in modern economic conditions that are characterized, on the one hand, by increasing humanistic values in society, public consciousness, the desire for sustainable economic systems, and on the other hand, by limited resources due to the crisis caused by the global pandemic. The article analyses scientific approaches to defining the concept of corporate social responsibility. The authors propose their own definition, according to which the main purpose of introducing corporate social responsibility into the company’s strategy is to achieve the target level of key performance indicators by improving the image of the organization because of socially significant actions and effective interaction with all stakeholders. According to this, the object, subject and principles of corporate social responsibility are defined in the article. The obtained results can be the basis for the development of a modern concept of corporate social responsibility, scientific and methodological approaches for its implementation in the company’s strategy.
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During their learning journey, individuals acquire competences that ought to be relevant for their career endeavours. The provision of quality education and its assurance is the responsibility of national governments. Very often, policy makers are expected to respond to challenging issues such as skill shortages and mismatches where candidates lack certain competencies although they could have attended compulsory education (Allen & De Weert, 2007). Yet, business and industry also offer training to human resources that supplements formal education (McKenzie & Woodruff, 2013). Arguably, the employees’ knowledge and skills may be too deep to bridge through corporate training sessions. The constraints on their growth may be halted by the broad impact of inadequate education and training in some industries or regions. On the other hand, corporations can easily shift their operations where it is viable for them to tap qualified employees.
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Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to analyze corporate sustainability commitment level (SCL) and its determinants by examining the extent of sustainability public disclosure information that are provided by hotels sustainability reports. The qualitative research tries to find an answer to the question "Which are the corporate sustainability practices in the international hotel chains?" Methodology-The qualitative research is based on the content analysis of corporative hotel reports. The process for this research begins with literature review and identification of preliminary categories. Qualitative analysis of the text about corporative sustainability was carried out using NVivo 11 software. Hierarchical notes were used in this research according to the Global Reporting Initiative groups. Findings-it should be noted that reporting on corporate responsibility and sustainability is important for hotel business. It presents the real picture of their operations and of its corporate social responsibility report consistently and fairly. The essence of reporting on corporate social responsibility is to provide accurate, adequate, clear and fresh information that is relevant to the public. Sustainability report must not become a marketing-oriented report. Contribution-The hotel company has to achieve its objectives, respectively, take into account the knowledge and skills of their employees from environmental policy to establish relations with clients (CRM) and suppliers, create marketing strategy, providing market positioning and design of brand loyalty. The value of the external structure is shown in the form of the ability to solve the needs and problems of customers. Goodwill trust and relations with customers and suppliers are changing over time. Organizational effectiveness is measured using the financial indicators and the importance of quality for members of the company and indicators such as satisfaction and loyalty.
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