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Feeling and Form. A Theory of Art Developed from "Philosophy in a New Key"

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... Emotional responses are related to aesthetic experiences (Langer, 1953). Music represents a symbolic expression leading to an emotion (Innis, 2009). ...
... Emotional interpretation of music through the performer can influence the quality of the musical performance, but it contributes equally to the performer's perceptions. According to Langer (1953), "[music] is a tonal analogue of emotive life" (p. 27). ...
... Creating music, composed or improvised, could be considered a spontaneous expression of feeling, influenced by an artist's state of mind. It may be that individuals' facial expression reflect their emotions while in the process of creating art (Langer, 1953). ...
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Understanding children’s emotional perceptions of creative tasks can contribute to the optimal design of music programs. Little is known of how young children perceive vocal tasks, and whether music training changes their emotional perceptions. This research examined children’s facial expressions while performing vocal imitation and improvisation tasks before and after music training. Young children ( N=79) aged four to six years were randomly assigned to a multimodal music program, Lego training, or a no-treatment control group. Their facial expressions while performing the tasks were analyzed, and learning outcomes were assessed by measuring participants’ pitch accuracy and improvisation skills at pre-and post-training. The results yielded no significant differences among the groups’ facial expressions. There was, however, a significant main effect of time such that participants showed more Surprise while performing vocal improvisation tasks. While participants in the multimodal music program scored higher on measures of pitch accuracy and improvisation skill, it may be necessary to increase the duration of early childhood music programs to reduce their feelings of apprehension when performing vocal improvisation tasks.
... What I meant by "implicit meaning" is that music does not have a clear meaning like words have and for that reason it can not be language. Langer (1942;1953) herself did not consider music as a language like I correctly quoted her because of this: She precisely uses the word "import" instead of "meaning" in the context of music because music does not have accurate meaning. However, she does not claim that music has not any meaning but it is not discursive art. ...
... Anyway, he postulated that we should still try to reach it, and I agree with him. Langer (1953) also talks about arts as the dynamic forms that include music too. Music can not be discursive form because it does not clearly convey meaning, rather it is expression of emotions, dynamic forms, where a listener may her-/himself provide its meaning. ...
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This is a letter to the editor about the article by Leif Edward Ottesen Kennair (2000) "Developing Minds for Pathology and Musicality: The Role of the Theory of Development of Personality and Pathology in Clinical Thinking Illustrated by the Effect of Taking an Evolutionary perspective" published in Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 9(1). See the whole discussion and debate of Developing Minds: https://njmt.w.uib.no/nordic-journal-of-music-therapy/forum-online-discussions-1998-2006/developing-minds/
... For example, on landscape, see Wylie (2007); on place, see Cresswell (2015) and Casey (1996Casey ( , 1997Casey ( , 2009); on milieu, see Canguilhem (2001Canguilhem ( [1952) and Buttimer (1971); on region, see Paasi (2011); on territory, see Delaney (2005) and Elden (2013b); on world, see Gaston (2013); on site, see Schatzki (2002), Marston et al. (2005), and Woodward et al. (2010). 6 These are just a selection of early discussions of (and influences on) ideas of social space (see James 1887a; Durkheim 1915;Langer 1953;Cassirer 1957;Buttimer 1969;Harvey 1969Harvey , 1970aSimmel 1997a; Bollnow 2011Bollnow [1963). See Chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7. 7 Attempts have been made to produce introductory texts and readers from the perspective of other disciplines, for example, literary studies (see Tally 2013Tally , 2017. ...
... Theory of Cultural Performance, ed. J.J. MacAloon(Philadelphia, 1984).117 For rites de passage see, e.g., V.W. Turner, The Forest of Symbols. ...
... All types of data, such as descriptions of physical things, values of things, and people's experiences, perceptions, attitudes, and opinions can be abstracted. The result of such abstraction is an overarching term or concept for all subordinate terms or concepts ( Langer, 1953 ). In qualitative content analysis, this abstraction is part of reorganisation and re-contextualisation, and it takes the form of a hierarchical structure that moves from closeness to distance as codes are compared and grouped into sub-categories and categories at increasing levels of abstraction ( Graneheim et al., 2017 ). ...
Article
Qualitative content analysis and other ‘standardised’ methods are sometimes considered to be technical tools used for basic, superficial, and simple sorting of text, and their results lack depth, scientific rigour, and evidence. To strengthen the trustworthiness of qualitative content analyses, we focus on abstraction and interpretation during the analytic process. To our knowledge, descriptions of these concepts are sparse; this paper therefore aims to elaborate on and exemplify the distinction and relation between abstraction and interpretation during the different phases of the process of qualitative content analysis. We address the relations between abstraction and interpretation when selecting, condensing, and coding meaning units and creating categories and themes on various levels. The examples used are based on our experiences of teaching and supervising students at various levels. We also highlight the phases of de-contextualisation and re-contextualisation in describing the analytic process. We argue that qualitative content analysis can be both descriptive and interpretative. When the data allow interpretations of the latent content, qualitative content analysis reveals both depth and meaning in participants’ utterances.
... Vastaavasti musiikki ja esimerkiksi sen yhteydessä tapahtuva tanssi antavat tunteille ja elämyksille dynaamisen muodon fyysisinä ääninä, liikkeinä ja ilmauksina, joilla ne representoivat taiteen avulla merkitystä ja kokemista. (Langer 1953;Alanne 2014;Snape 2020.) Osa musiikin, tanssin ja kuvan abstraktia elämyksellisyyttä vastaavaa hermostollista funktionaalista rakennetta ovat ns. ...
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Music and language are expression relating to the human nature, which communicate inside and between human beings. As the sounds of life they speak within the feelings and experiences they arise similarly. The meaning of art, language and unconscious reveals by listening to their associations. Musiikki ja kieli ovat inhimillisiä ilmaisumuotoja, jotka kommunikoivat sekä sisäisesti ihmisessä että ihmisten välillä. Elämän ääninä ne puhuttelevat samankaltaisesti herättämiensä tunteiden ja kokemusten pohjalta. Taiteen, kielen ja tiedostamattoman merkitykset avautuvat kuuntelemalla niiden herättämiä assosiaatiota.
... This methodological approach is as speculative as it is pragmatic in driving towards new ethical, political, and aesthetic ends. And further, rewriting affect into the scene of formalist and applied aesthetics incites the reorientation of the praxis of performance toward the expression, creation, intuition and vitality of form in organic relation with the autonomy of feelings (see Langer 1953), particularly as they offset pervasively human aspirations and intentions. ...
Article
Within the framework of performance, affects have largely been invoked to explain embodied visceral responses to texts. What I propose here instead is to introduce the dimension of affect as a matter of form (Brinkema [2014]. The Forms of the Affects. Durham, NC: Duke University Press). In other words, the formal composition of performance is itself the result of the work of affects. To demonstrate this claim, I will introduce a close reading of Yvonne Rainer’s iconic work Trio A (1966) as a formal expression of the mechanisms of shame (Sedgwick [2003]. Touching Feeling. Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. Durham, NC: Duke University Press). Paradoxically, this applied affective structure can be mobilised beside itself and ‘towards an aesthetics of care’ (Thompson [2015]. “Towards an Aesthetics of Care.” Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance 20 (4): 430–441).
... Esta concepción requiere del profesorado una auténtica comprensión de la naturaleza epistemológica de su materia y una bien fundamentada y firme comprensión teórica de sus principios básicos. Langer (1953), considera que el arte es una actividad cognitiva basada en el sentimiento y, por tanto, es absurdo defender que el artista no piensa de forma tan profunda e intensa como el investigador científico. En la actualidad, lo mismo sostiene Camnitzer (2015), para quien el arte es una forma de pensar, no un procedimiento de producción. ...
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La pandemia COVID-19 ha venido para quedarse, por lo que nos veremos obligados a adaptar nuestra forma de vida para convivir con ella. Con todo, las crisis suponen siempre una oportunidad para la innovación y el cambio y, en consecuencia, como educadores tenemos la obligación de repensar la didáctica de las enseñanzas artísticas y las metodologías para utilizar las estrategias dramáticas en cualquier nivel educativo. En este artículo intentamos proponer unas reflexiones centradas en los siguientes puntos: repensar la educación inspirada por las pedagogías emergentes; postular las enseñanzas artísticas como core curriculum; revisar los contenidos de teatro/drama en la educación y las nuevas modalidades teatrales; reconsiderar el papel del profesorado de enseñanzas artísticas en la educación; proporcionar al profesorado nuevos procesos de aprendizaje con las TICs y metodologías fundamentadas en las TACs; considerar las actividades artísticas como instrumento para el trabajo por ámbitos en la enseñanza; y plantear nuevos instrumentos para valorar las actividades y productos escénicos en la educación. En definitiva, el reto que se nos presenta actualmente es cómo trasladar a la virtualidad los elementos esenciales de las enseñanzas artísticas, que se basan en el proceso, la performatividad, la presencia, y el deseo de crear juntos.
... Equally important, however, is the feeling of belonging that comes from the deep identification with a place through imagination and art, that is, when the experience of acquaintance of a person with a place is achieved through artistic means, such as literature, music, cinema, painting [8]. Philosopher Susan Langer states that in artistic creation meanings become more directly understood because no thoughts mediate to the communication [9]. ...
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The cultural landscapes have a dual, material and intangible nature being the result of interactions between people and nature through time. Considering that its understanding requires integrated analysis techniques we experimented a mapping method in «Revolutionary Palimpsests», a research project investigating the cultural landscapes of settlements that played an important role in the Greek War of Independence. Combining design, cartography and visual arts and focusing on socio-spatial complexities, our researchers produced maps of both artistic and informative nature revealing the mnemonic traces of such a historical event on those settlements. Maps’ exhibition in a visual art event is expected to sensitize the public to that local heritage. We argue that the protection and promotion of the cultural landscape plays a significant role in development, strengthening the local identity and commitment, also enhancing the attractiveness, that is essential especially for inaccessible settlements that are facing development deficiencies, such as many mountainous and island settlements in Greece. From about 150 mapped «revolutionary settlements» we will refer below to the example of two inaccessible areas, Souli in Epirus and Mani (Maina) in Peloponnese, exploring the question of whether the protection and promotion of their cultural landscape could contribute to development.
... Despite the concept of iconic signs, which at least "re"-present qualities by signs carrying those qualities in the sign, Langer (1953) suggests some kind of presentative symbol: the form making the feeling present. She speaks, in terms of semiotics, at least about the immediately communicative functions of qualities, which work within the concept of presenting by stimulation despite representation by media. ...
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Collection of essays on the occasion of the 65th birthday of musicologist Nikša Gligo. It contains 64 contributions in various languages (Croatian, English, French, German, Slovenian), CV, list of published works and mentorships of Nikša Gligo and index of names. Contributions by Dieter Schnebel, Frank Corcoran, Vinko Globokar, Ruben Radica, Bogdan Gagić, Silvio Foretić, Eva Sedak, Davorka Radica, John Tilbury, Zdenka Kapko- Foretić, Richard Lerman, Vladimir Gudac, Robert Moran, Miloš Raičković, Michael Fahres, Seadeta Midžić, Marko Ruždjak, Herbert Henck, David Toop, Ivanka Stoianova, Đurđa Otržan, Mladen Tarbuk, Koraljka Kos, Dieter Kaufmann, Ališer Sijarić, Matjaž Barbo, Mirela Ivičević, Walter Zimmermann, Stevan Kovacs Tickmayer, Ben Johnston, Miroslav Miša Savić, Ingrid Pustijanac, Mirjana Siriščević, Vito Balić, Ivan Čavlović, Ennio Stipčević, Dalibor Davidović, Katarina Livljanić, Hana Breko Kustura, Zdravko Blažeković, Markus Bandur, John Neubauer, Bojan Bujić, Vjera Katalinić, Rozina Palić-Jelavić, Irena Paulus, Nada Bezić, Vladimir Biti, Diana Grgurić, Josef Anton Riedl, Josip Užarević, Sead Muhamedagić, Ingeborg Fülepp, Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Leon Stefanija, Werner Jauk, Mladen Milićević, Naila Ceribašić, Svanibor Pettan, Dan Oki, Nadežda Čačinovič, Heiko Daxl, Sanja Majer-Bobetko, Feđa Vukić.
... Hay una corriente de pensamiento que identifica el arte como forma de pensar. Susan K. Langer (1953), considera que el arte es una actividad cognitiva basada en el sentimiento y, por tanto, es absurdo defender que el artista no piensa de forma tan profunda e intensa como el investigador científico. En la actualidad, lo mismo sostiene Camnitzer (2015), para quien el arte es una forma de pensar, no un procedimiento de producción. ...
Article
Full-text available
La pandemia COVID-19 ha venido para quedarse, por lo que nos veremos obligados a adaptar nuestra forma de vida para convivir con ella. Con todo, las crisis suponen siempre una oportunidad para la innovación y el cambio y, en consecuencia, como educadores tenemos la obligación de repensar la didáctica de las enseñanzas artísticas y las metodologías para utilizar las estrategias dramáticas en cualquier nivel educativo. En este artículo intentamos proponer unas reflexiones centradas en los siguientes puntos: repensar la educación inspirada por las pedagogías emergentes; postular las enseñanzas artísticas como core curriculum; revisar los contenidos de teatro/drama en la educación y las nuevas modalidades teatrales; reconsiderar el papel del profesorado de enseñanzas artísticas en la educación; proporcionar al profesorado nuevos procesos de aprendizaje con las TICs y metodologías fundamentadas en las TACs; considerar las actividades artísticas como instrumento para el trabajo por ámbitos en la enseñanza; y plantear nuevos instrumentos para valorar las actividades y productos escénicos en la educación. En definitiva, el reto que se nos presenta actualmente es cómo trasladar a la virtualidad los elementos esenciales de las enseñanzas artísticas, que se basan en el proceso, la performatividad, la presencia, y el deseo de crear juntos.
... Regarding the detection of rule-following, Sundberg and Lindblom (1976) for instance, described Swedish nursery tunes in terms of a generative rule system. Langer (1953) mentioned that music, like language, has discrete parts that can be combined in a variety of ways to make new expressive wholes. Lerdahl and Jackendoff (1983) published their generative theory of tonal music, and Povel (2010) designed algorithms for generating melodies. ...
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From a biological point of view, the singing of songs is based on the human vocal learning capacity. It is universally widespread in all cultures. The transmission of songs is an elementary cultural practice, by which members of the older generations introduce both musico-linguistic rules and affect-regulative means to the younger ones. Traditionally, informal singing in familiar settings primarily subserves affect-regulation goals, whereas formal song transmission is embedded in various normative claims and interests, such as preserving cultural heritage and representing collective and national identity. Songs are vocal acts and abstract models that are densely structured and conform to cultural rules. Songs mirror each generations’ wishes, desires, values, hopes, humor, and stories and rest on unfathomable traditions of our cultural and human history. Framed in the emerging scientific field of didactics, I argue that research on formal song transmission needs to make explicit the norms and rules that govern the relationships between song, teacher, and pupils. I investigate these three didactic components, first, by conceptualizing song as rule-governed in terms of a grammar, with songs for children representing the most elementary musico-linguistic genre. The Children’s Song Grammar presented here is based on syllables as elements and on syntactic rules concerning timing, tonality, and poetic language. It makes it possible to examine and evaluate songs in terms of correctness and well-formedness. Second, the pupils’ learning of a target song is exemplified by an acoustical micro-genetic study that shows how vocalization is gradually adapted to the song model. Third, I address the teachers’ role in song transmission with normative accounts and provide exemplary insights into how we study song teaching empirically. With each new song, a teacher teaches the musico-linguistic rules that constitute the respective genre and conveys related cultural feelings. Formal teaching includes self-evaluation and judgments with respect to educational duties and aesthetic norms. This study of the three-fold didactic process shows song transmission as experiencing shared rule-following that induces feelings of well-formedness. I argue that making the inherent normativity of this process more explicit – here systematically at a descriptive and conceptual level – enhances the scientificity of this research domain.
... "Abstraction" is the outcome of this process -a concept that acts as a common denominator for all subordinate concepts and connects all concepts as a group, field or category. The sculptural form is a strong abstraction from real objects and the three-dimensional space we construct ... by touch and sight " [4] . ...
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In the literature that follows the history and theory of architecture,architecture is mainly studied from the aspect of disposition, constructionand materialization “in itself”, sporadically establishing the “originality”(first appearance) of certain dimensions of architectural solutions andtheir connection with solutions from previous historical epochs. The titleof this work (Network of Architectural Paths) suggests the simultaneousuniqueness (authenticity) of people and their culture throughout the planetEarth and comprehensiveness (universality) of human ideas and all formsof human creativity. The aim of this work is to show the authenticity ofideas (expressed by architecture) in accordance with the concrete naturaland social environment and, at the same time, their mutual connection(networking) on the global world level (Earth). Examples of vernaculararchitecture in various parts of the world and examples of author’s(contemporary) architecture in other parts of the world that are articulatedin the language of the modern era while preserving the concepts of theirvernecular “models” are thus compared. The methodological approachin this paper is based on the author’s theory of architecture, which hedescribed and published in his book: Hadrovic, A. (2007). DefiningArchitectural Space on the Model of the Oriental Style CityHouse inBosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo and Macedonia,Booksurge, LLC, North Charleston, SC, USA.
... Visual analysis is considered one of the best tools to capture organisational actorhood via communication practices, given its ability to grasp the animation and complexities of actors (Halgin et al., 2018;Guthey and Jackson, 2005). Images can depict multiple meanings and evoke a variety of complex and abstract feelings and interpretations (Langer, 1953). An organisation's presentation of themselves as actors can be best achieved through images, given that visual images represent a transformation from something invisible and unobservable into something that has a form and is visible (H€ ollerer et al., 2013). ...
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... In his refutation of philosophical theorizing in the sense of constructing definitions of philosophical entities, has furnished contemporary aesthetics with a starting point for any future progress. (1956, 30) 25 It has-to my knowledge-gone unnoticed that the first expression of Weitz's Wittgenstein-influenced anti-essentialism appeared two years earlier in a critical notice of Langer's (1953). Weitz objects there to Langer's theory of art on the grounds that it rests on a conception of language that Wittgenstein had advanced in his early work and that had since "been refuted, and by no other more certainly than by the later Wittgenstein himself" (1954, 470). ...
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The long-overlooked position of American logician and philosopher of art Susanne K. Langer, which appears to be marked by the divide between continental and analytic philosophy, is currently experiencing a renaissance. Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin's The Philosophy of Susanne Langer: Embodied Meaning in Logic, Art and Feeling is an investigation of her concepts, influences and broad intellectual life in the wake of the early twentieth century’s advances in symbolic logic. Mainly known for a semiology that hypothesized an art symbol in order to conceptualize artistic expression (thereby expanding the semantic toolkit of discursive forms in linguistic, scientific and logical symbols), Langer’s contributions to various branches of philosophy had long been misunderstood and unfortunately ignored. Her philosophy continued European movements growing from the ‘linguistic’, respectively ‘symbolic turn’, and developed to a quite idiosyncratic research of the biology of symbolization processes that anticipated later theories on embodied cognition and the intersecting of philosophy and the special sciences. Considering the still-undeveloped research on her work in anglophone academia, and an unfortunate bias regarding the interpretation of her concepts, Dengerink Chaplin's contribution is an extraordinarily valuable source that further illuminates a blind spot in the history of American philosophy and aesthetics.
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due to the major technological development happened in the last 20 years, technology had great role in changing the architectural constants and classifying its priorities. Many studies focused on technology notion and its application in architecture. But they did not focus on the rule of technology to realize Human reliance on internal and external spaces in which the people spend most of their time in.The information technology with its developments has great impact on actions & behaviors of human beings. Here the research idea in “Lack of sufficient scientific knowledge about the impact of technology of virtual reality to achieve the existential nature of the personality in virtual space. The search aimed to discuss "Clarifying the role of virtual reality technology to establish an internal virtual theoretical framework of space which seeks to achieve human existential lost in realistic space achieving the goal required having Comprehensive theoretical framework .This theoretical framework as a first stage of theoretical framework .The second stage of tries to clarify the main levels of the practical study to clarify truth fullness of indicators achieved through out:selecting items of theoretical framework. The final conclusions of the research which include theoretical framework conclusions, application results conclusions.
Thesis
This thesis aims to develop a critical vocabulary for dealing with site-specific performances. It focuses on their association with dereliction and decay and assesses the implications of this. A central claim is that these performance modes are best understood in terms of their critical reception. I argue that site-specific performances redefine the language of criticism while profoundly questioning theatre's cultural location. Even in the cases of site-specific performances that flagrantly negate traditional theatre forms, the theatre text and critical frameworks, these return in said performances as fragmented, spectral or unconscious. The thesis divides into two parts. Part 1 deals with the emergence of site-specific performance at the intersection of trends in art and theatre in the 1960s. It outlines the role of decay and the 'found' object/space in creating a genealogy for site-specific performances, while showing how critical writing changed to map this new terrain (Chapter 1). Furthermore, it argues that site-specific performances are characterized by distinctive modes of critical writing, in which the critic is self-reflexive and creative (Chapter 2). Arguing that critics are deeply implicated in the production of site-specific performances, Part 1 ends with a critical and creative reconstruction of Deborah Warner's use of abandoned sites for performances in London in the 1990s (Chapter 3). Part 2 of the thesis re-reads the creation of Peter Brook's Bouffes du Nord and Ariane Mnouchkine's Cartoucherie de Vincennes as site-specific events which were subsequently reinscribed as the defining moment in each theatre's history. I show how site-specificity changed from being a counter-cultural gesture into a constantly redeployed marker of cultural identification. Chapter 4 examines narratives of the discovery of the two theatre venues by their directors and critics, showing how site-specificity is produced at the intersection of individual, cultural and aesthetic discourses. Analysis of the Bouffes du Nord in Chapter 5 charts the critical uses of the theatre's decay, while Chapter 6 views the Cartoucherie as the culmination of the Théâtre du Soleil's quest for group identity through identification with workers.
Article
Can Kant’s theory of fine art serve as a theory of modern art? It all depends on what ‘modern’ means. The word can mean current or contemporary, indexed to the time of use, and in that sense the answer is yes: Kant’s theory of genius implies that successful art is always to some extent novel, so there should always be something that counts as contemporary art on his theory. But ‘modern’ can also be used adjectively, perhaps more properly as ‘modernist’, to refer to art of a particular moment, in some cases superseded by postmodern art. Kant’s theory is not a theory of modernist art in at least one prominent form, the formalism of Clement Greenberg. But other theories, such as those of George Dickie and Arthur Danto, although triggered by particular works of modernist art and meant to accommodate them, were meant to be theories of what art was always doing, and Kant’s is too. In that sense it can be considered a modern theory of art but not a theory of modern art.
Chapter
The series, directed by Lucio Milano, is devoted to the studies of ancient and late-ancient world. It is intended for hosting both publications arising from the research activities of Ca’ Foscari and publications of Italian and foreign scholars and institutions that help to highlight the academic network of national and international collaborations in the field of Classical. It is divided into four sections: History and Epigraphy; Archeology; Oriental Studies; Philology and Literature.
Chapter
Focused on Nintendo’s crossover fighting series Super Smash Bros, this chapter explores its relations with previous forms of physical comedy and group humour such as slapstick cinema, Japanese theatre and commedia dell’arte, drawing on interviews with game designers as well as oral testimonies from comedians, filmmakers and art historians. In order to interrogate the specificity of visual humour in game environments, and particularly within Nintendo’s imagery, the text compares classic gags and comedic routines of this franchise with similar formal and aesthetic configurations from other media, going back to historical definitions and theories of physical comedy, thus vindicating a type of humour based on movements, gestures and spatial imbalances instead of words and dialogues. Overall, the chapter argues that the Smash Bros games allow players to perform almost like silent clowns, using adaptability, improvisation and surprise to develop their own comedic styles and share laughs together.KeywordsVisual humourVideo gamesSlapstickCinemaComedyTheatreHistory
Conference Paper
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The 21st century has implied technological advances and improvements in the quality of life. It is useful that the ecological design is exposed from the educational institutions, so that a deterioration does not take place in the environment. The ecological footprint is a factor that analyzes the environmental impact generated by the demand and the use made of the resources available in the ecosystems. In recent decades, these indicators of pollution and excessive use of non-degradable raw materials have risen considerably, so it is necessary to think about ecological design to maintain the balance for future generations. In Arts Education, practices with an initial approach of analysis can be offered through cartographies, timelines, infographics or drawings that imply a study before the creation of the prototype and the product. After this study, it must be related to some of the fields of ecological design whether product design, packaging design, sustainable architecture, among others. It is also necessary to be aware of the natural materials to be used, as it is essential to maintain life cycles in harmony with nature. Finally, works will be exposed on packaging through ecological design with a vision for the educational field at the university stage.
Article
Tal y como están las facultades de educación organizadas actualmente, los filósofos de la educación tienen una existencia marginal y furtiva. A medida que la educación se entiende cada vez más como una investigación científica social sobre "lo que funciona" en las escuelas, los filósofos parecen ser cada vez más inútiles. Incluso nuestro papel en la formación del profesorado, que una vez estuvo asegurado por la metáfora de los fundamentos, ahora es cuestionable. Los debates en la formación del profesorado están bastante animados: ¿los profesores necesitan más asignaturas o más experiencia clínica? Y si necesitan más asignaturas, ¿necesitan más clases de didáctica o más conocimiento sobre la asignatura que enseñan? Nos damos cuenta así de que el tipo de experiencia que los filósofos de la educación pueden ofrecer a los profesores ni siquiera está en el marco de interés. ¿Cuál es la experiencia que los filósofos de la educación podemos ofrecer? En una palabra, es un aprendizaje liberal acerca de y para la educación. Si la educación es un espacio de preguntas humanísticas, la filosofía un amor por estas preguntas en su apertura y la filosofía educativa el oficio de mantener vivos los textos y la conversación que nos ayudan a reabrir tales preguntas, entonces la formación filosófica del profesorado es una invitación a los profesores a que sean intelectuales humanos de su campo. Es una invitación a unirse a una conversación de interés milenario. Según la concepción que he desarrollado, la Filosofía de la Educación está lejos de ser marginal. Nos ayuda a recordar cómo cada programa educativo sobre “lo que funciona” plantea preguntas clave. Y, además, recuerda a la universidad que, parafraseando el famoso ensayo de Sartre, la educación es un humanismo. Cuando la educación y las humanidades se vuelven a conectar su lugar en el centro de la universidad queda claro.
Article
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An aesthetic and epistemological departure from ocular centrism has occurred in the wake of current technological evolutions and the posthuman turn. The sonic exploration of the more-than-human takes artists and philosophers beyond anthropomorphism to reveal the hidden patterning of life forms and yet-unfathomed universes. The conflation of nature(s) with culture(s) is one shift that takes place when thinking with sounds and rhythm and studying our environments. On an ontological level, a reordering of subject and object occurs when encountering the reciprocal relationship of sounding . What if culture is actually nature? How does technology connect with botany, and what does it mean to engage the environment with the expanded tactility of the ear? This essay observes current inter-species practices in sound art by revisiting philosopher Susanne Langer’s theory of an embodied and embedded mind. Her “new key” in philosophy emphasizes music as a dynamic sound-pattern to conceptualize a semiology of artistic forms that renders human feeling in regard to non-human antecedents. This serves as a tool to trace the preconceptual substrata of mind, leading us through process-oriented studies of nature and psychophysical affect. Thinking with Langer involves the interconnection of natural systems, behavioural patterns, and human expression, which emerges in art.
Book
The series, directed by Lucio Milano, is devoted to the studies of ancient and late-ancient world. It is intended for hosting both publications arising from the research activities of Ca’ Foscari and publications of Italian and foreign scholars and institutions that help to highlight the academic network of national and international collaborations in the field of Classical. It is divided into four sections: History and Epigraphy; Archeology; Oriental Studies; Philology and Literature.
Article
This article critically examines the visual and mediated communication of vice presidential candidate and now vice president, Kamala Harris, and Harris’s political surrogates leading up to the 2020 presidential election. As a launching point, we build on our 2016 election retrospective, where we analyzed “Hillary Through Time” and found that political women were not only primed to “take advantage of the democratization of visual rhetorical presentations” but also, political women could challenge normative coverage “through a mediated image of her own making.” Fast forward 4 years, we offer such agency through the visual communication of Kamala’s campaign-mediated image. Drawing from the philosophy of Susanne K. Langer, we argue that Kamala Harris intentionally advances “artful political communication” as a method for challenging gendered aesthetic tropes of political women; ultimately shifting the narrative of “2 for the price of 1” from deferential to empowered.
Chapter
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Il territorio appare oggi frammentato poiché ha perso la sua wholeness, struttura di relazione che lega i singoli elementi (Alexander et alii). In risposta a tale criticità in atto, la ricerca si pone come obiettivo quello di approfondire il tema delle invarianti strutturali derivanti dal punto di vista morfologico e percettivo, sia in ambito urbano che territoriale. Lo studio si concentra sulle relazioni esistenti tra spazio ed emozione in un'ottica di riprogettazione degli spazi dove la ricerca della “bellezza” diventa di nuovo pratica (Hillman).
Article
Un parcours spatial est couramment emprunté dans différentes formes de danse : le mouvement circulaire – de la circumambulation de certaines danses rituelles au « manège » de la danse classique occidentale, en passant par les rondes des danses traditionnelles. Le mouvement circulaire est un motif qui, par sa récurrence même, témoigne d’une filiation entre forme rituelle et forme artistique et spectaculaire qu’il sera intéressant d’explorer en premier lieu. Cette analyse du mouvement circulaire dans la spécificité de ses contextes et de ses déploiements chorégraphiques nous permettra ensuite de passer en revue les différentes fonctions – magiques, symboliques ou plastiques – qui lui sont assignées ; et d’ainsi réfléchir, à partir de cette observation des mutations d’un motif dansé, sur le processus, à l’œuvre dans la danse, d’évolution conjointe des formes gestuelles et de leurs charges signifiantes.
Article
In this paper I reconstruct Schiller's theory of virtue from his essay “On grace and dignity” and discuss how it fits into Kant's moral philosophy. According to Schiller, a virtuous person – a beautiful soul – is characterised by harmony between reason and sensibility. I show that despite some misleading textual clues and interpretations based on them, Schiller does not regard the harmony between reason and sensibility as an equal partnership. On the contrary, just like Kant, Schiller fully recognises the priority of reason. The difference between their positions is more subtle. Whereas Kant holds that sensibility must be overtly subordinated to reason, Schiller believes that there should be a semblance of an equal partnership between reason and sensibility, provided that the latter is sufficiently ennobled.
Article
For some Western translators before the twentieth century, domestication was their strategy to translate the classical Chinese poetry into English. But the consequence of this strategy was the sacrifice of the ideogrammic nature of these poems. The translators in the twentieth century, especially the Imagist poets and translators in the 1930s, overcame the problems of their predecessors and their translation theory and practice was close to that of the contemporary semiotic translators. But both Imagist translators and contemporary semiotic translators have the problem of indifference to the feeling of the original in their translations. For the problem of translating the classical Chinese poetry by the Westerners before the twentieth century and the Imagist poets and translators of the twentieth century, see Zhao and Flotow 2018. This paper attempts to set up an aesthetic-semiotic approach to the translation of the iconicity of classical Chinese poetry on the basis of the examination of both Eastern and Western translation studies.
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