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Jacques Lacan and the Philosophy of Psychoanalysis

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... Asian Social Science Vol. 11, No. 2;2015 our desire based on this Other. In Lacanian psychoanalysis a subject leaves his association with the mother to live as an independent being under the Name of the Father. ...
... Asian Social Science Vol. 11, No. 2;2015 DuBois ' (1989) idea with regard to the double consciousness that a person can get a glance about his self by the way others consider him. Carey, from the first novel to the present, has tended to celebrate the ways in which the veil empowers the Australian subject to negotiate subjectivity. ...
... Asian Social Science Vol. 11, No. 2;2015 like Tristan is full of tension because their death is impending. Carey challenges the readiness of the subjects who cooperate in their own impoverishment. ...
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Peter Carey is the prominent novelist of contemporary Australia. His novels delve into the country’s search for cultural subjectivity and nationalism. He uses his own style for interrogating dominant ideology which challenges people’s attempts for acquiring identity. This paper is aimed to give a psycho-social analysis of the concept of the other in Illywhacker (1985) and The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith (1994). In the novels all the characters whether man or women are depicted as controlled by a phallocentric ideology. These characters in their quest for subjectivity create the other. To discuss the reasons I found Lacanian views about ideology very efficient. For the reason that Lacan assumed that unconscious is discourse of the other. In these novels characters’ attempts for achieving subjectivity are frustrated due to the ideology which is prevailed in the society. Open-endedness of these novels challenges the fictionality of history and the reality depicted therein. It seems that there is a similarity between Carey’s notions of imperialism and Lacan’s interpretation of the real.
... The fathers of psychoanalysis, Lacan and Freud, propose that the human subject is split between the Object like narcissistic Being (Moi) and the Speaking subject (Je). 22 A human subject is not a progressive trajectory from childhood to adulthood, but is stretched over all its four corners; in Lacan's Schema L (Moi) gives rise to and remains entwined with (Je) for a subject's life (see Figure 4). The view from the first storey rear terrace of House C is a view of the convent to the north, a hybrid mixture of Italianate and Gothic revival architecture, and the exotic deciduous trees adorning its gardens, accentuated by a rising topography. ...
... 337-338). Lacan explains "without being aware of conscious thought" as "a repressed but organized and intelligent discourse of the other" [27] (p. 99). ...
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Toni Morrison discusses the rebirth of the entire Black race through self-recovery. However, her novels are not limited to the identity of Black women and people but are linked to a wider community. Morrison might have tried to imagine a community in which Black identity can be socially constituted. In this paper, we discuss the concept of community by examining communitarianism, which is the basis of justice and human rights. Although community is an ambiguous notion in the context of communitarianism, communitarians criticize the abstract conceptualization of human rights by liberal individualists, but also see that human rights are universally applicable to a community as a shared conception of social good. Communitarianism emphasizes the role and importance of community in personal life, self-formation, and identity. Morrison highlights the importance of self-worth within the boundary of community, reclaiming the development of Black identity. In the Nancian sense, a community is not a work of art to be produced. It is communicated through sharing the finitude of others—that is, “relation” itself is the fundamental structure of existence. In this regard, considering Toni Morrison’s novels alongside communitarianism and Nancy’s analysis of community may enable us to obtain a sense of the complex aspects of self and community. For Morrison, community may be the need for harmony and combination, acknowledging the differences and diversity of each other, not the opposition between the self and the other, the center and periphery, men and women. This societal communitarianism is the theme covered in this paper, which deals with the problem of identity loss in Morrison’s representative novels Sula and Beloved and examines how Black individuals and community are formed. Therefore, this study aims to examine a more complex understanding of community, in which the self and relations with others can be formed, in the context of Toni Morrison’s works.
... Both Lacan and Winnicott have significantly impacted the way we may think of ourselves. Deborah Anna Luepnitz notes that when we theorise the human being, 'the Winnicottian "I" relate' and 'the Lacanian "I" ⁄ it speak(s)' (964) should be added to the canonical composite of 'the medieval "I" believe; the Cartesian "I" think; the Romantic "I" feel; . . . the existential "I" choose [and] the Freudian "I" dream' (Ragland-Sullivan 1986in Luepnitz 2009. Psychoanalyst Peter Green, whose work is informed both by Lacan and Winnicott, regards them as the two most influential thinkers after Freud (in Luepnitz 2009, 960). ...
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This article contrasts the theories of ego formation put forward in Jacques Lacan’s ‘The Mirror Stage’ and Donald Winnicott’s ‘The Mirror Role of the Mother,’ and discusses their methodological implications for the field of American studies. While Lacan theorises subjectivity as irreparably split and (self-)alienated, Winnicott offers an optimistic version of a self which is sustained in its going-on-being by a nourishing maternal presence. These disparate conceptualisations of the human being produce two powerful frames through which to approach culture. Yet, while Lacan is widely recognised in the American studies scholarship, Winnicott remains virtually unknown. This article aims to enhance the visibility of the British author by outlining the productivity of his ideas for any cultural or literary analysis. By stressing the foundational significance of the primary bond Winnicott’s theory intervenes in the recent critiques of neoliberal capitalism which remain halted in a Lacanian-like melancholic mode, masked by a cultural command of perpetual enjoyment. The Winnicottian perspective challenges Lacan’s fixation on the unattainable objects of desire, reiterated by the neoliberal myth of self-perfection through consumption, and offers an alternative pattern of human sociality, based on relational, self-reflexive moderation.
... 5-10). Since Felman's article, numerous books and articles have been published on the implication between literature and psychoanalysis, indicating her success at opening a question (see for example, Gallop, 1985;Ragland-Sullivan, 1986;Mellard, 1991;Brooks, 1994;Stoltfutz, 1996). ...
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Departing from Jacques Lacan’s influence on literary and pedagogical studies, this article explores how his conceptualization of “style” informs literature and pedagogy in addition to psychoanalysis. The article suggests that Lacan’s theorization of the human subject as the “letter” of psychoanalysis shows the interminability of reading and teaching due to his description of the “letter” as the literality of the human subject. This literality points to the construction of the humans as social subjects in the symbolic register and thus marks language an indispensable element of style. Dwelling in the function of language in style, the article traces the paths Lacan takes in order to disrupt the idea of the psychoanalytic connection based on the analyst’s mastery. It concentrates on transference and what Lacan calls “passionate ignorance” in a transferential relation for the purpose of explaining how this disruption is realized. Moreover, Lacan’s own style of learning from Freud as well as his own style of teaching is discussed to further emphasize that education, like psychoanalysis and literature, should alternatively open a space for “passionate ignorance” to create the possibility of dialogic interaction.
... However, Lacan's lateral thinking, mainly in regard to philosophy, developmental psychology, psychoanalysis, linguistics, and structuralism renders much of his work hardly digestible (Bailly, 2018). Indeed, the paternal metaphor perpetuates a certain esoterism regularly associated with Lacan's psychoanalytical contributions (Feldstein & Ragland-Sullivan, 1987). ...
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Amongst the most significant stages in Lacanian psychosexual development, the paternal metaphor remains at the forefront of Lacanian oedipal ontogenesis. Customarily auxiliary to the signifier of the Name-of-the-father, the occurrence of this stage marks early-stage signifier repression as well as the conceptualization of the phallus up until the castration complex. Namely formulated by Lacan in his Seminar V (and later in Écrits), the paternal metaphor is quintessential to the understanding of primary signifiers in the child’s psychosexual development. This paper will elucidate the normative framework of the paternal metaphor via Saussurean mathemes, hypothetical observations and fundamental Lacanian additions to Freudian psychoanalysis—namely linguistic sign interpretation, hence the signifier (S) and the signified (s).
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This article uses Jacques Lacan’s reading of the Freudian fort-da game to analyze that most American of cultural constructs, the cowboy, at the time of that figure’s fading from the American landscape: the immediate postwar years. With John Grady Cole, the protagonist of "All the Pretty Horses" (1992), Cormac McCarthy provides a suitably situated subject for this critical endeavor, one whose subjective characteristics become present through dramatically playful division of his maternal imago. These games of psychoanalytical maturation, which emerge from the alternation between psychoanalysis in theory and that theory in critical practice, and which trace their subject’s successive relocations to alternative sides of the American-Mexican border, articulate the inevitable though resisted diminishment of Cole’s cultural construction.
Article
This paper analyzes narrative strategies used by Leonardo Sciascia in Porte aperte to create, among readers, sympathy for and identification with his (nameless) protagonist, a judge and an opponent of capital punishment. The judge has been called on to preside over a murder trial in 1937, a decade after Fascism had re-instated the death penalty, considered by the Regime a deterrent that would allow Italians to sleep with “open doors.” To that end, I consider the historical context in which the novel was written—given that Italian Constitution, in force since 1 January 1948, had abolished the death penalty—and the impact Sciascia sought to have on his readers. That is, Sciascia’s long-time opposition to the death penalty is to some extent pretext for ‘re-litigating’ in 1987, a decade after the fact, two polemics of the late 1970s. The first public controversy had been sparked by his declaration (issued during the trial of colonna torinese of the Red Brigades) of personal neutrality in the struggle of the Italian State to suppress terrorist subversion, the other by Sciascia’s contention that the political parties who refused to negotiate with the terrorists for the release of Aldo Moro had indirectly re-introduced the death penalty in Italy.
Article
Jacques Lacan has creatively grafted Zhuangzi’s concept of the subject on the Western tradition of Logo-centrism. Lacan rewrites the triangle positions of the subject as the Real, the Imaginary, the Symbolic, expresses them in the vocabulary of detective stories, and achieves his scholarly reputation. The insufficiency of his theory could be redressed by Zhuangzi’s idea of ‘the poetics of oneness.’ For Zhuangzi, a man can forget his ‘Social I’ and ‘Corporeal I,’ arrive at the phase of ‘the equality of things’ in his symbiotic fusion with the surrounding things. These two thinkers complement each other and enrich our understanding of the subject.
Chapter
It seems natural to think about literature in terms of dreams. Like dreams, literary works are fictions, inventions of the mind that, although based on reality, are by definition not literally true. Like a literary work, a dream may have some truth to tell, but, like a literary work, it may need to be interpreted before that truth can be grasped. We can live vicariously through romantic fictions, much as we can through daydreams. Terrifying novels and nightmares affect us in much the same way, plunging us into an atmosphere that continues to cling, even after the last chapter has been read — or the alarm clock has sounded.
Chapter
In The Name of the Rose the deafness to laughter and the lack of insight into the comic aspects of the human condition lead to murder, inquisition, and torture and the destruction of the lost book on comedy of Aristotle’s Poetics in a fire at a monastery.1 This lack of comedy and laughter has all too often led to a blind solemnity that undervalues the comic and sets up a dreary hierarchy of disciplines. Although a master of the poetic and fictional, Plato wanted to banish the poets who would not sing paeans to the republic. Aristotle restored a place for poetics, but it was beneath philosophy, which was more universal, and above history, which was less so.2 Philip Sidney put poetry on top because its universal and concrete images were more accessible in moving people to virtue, yet he kept history in the basement.3 Either through a loss of Aristotle’s discussion of comedy or through a sense that men were like Saint Paul and had shed childish things when they came of age, comic recognition or insight (cognitio) seldom if ever gained the same status in literary theory and criticism that tragic recognition (anagnorisis) achieved.
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James B. Twitchell suggests that horror art develops at a moment of “communal insecurity.” The English fin-de-siècle monsters, for example, appeared in a moment of deep questioning of Victorian cultural value (50). The ghosts of The Turn of the Screw are monstrous in the sense that their anti-hegemonic discourse is opposed to the governess’s discourse, which is subjected to the master’s hegemonic and patriarchal power. My hypothesis is that the novel illustrates the confrontation of those antagonistic forces, having as a battlefield the pupils Miles and Flora. I base my analysis mainly on Psychoanalytical Feminism and the historical account of the Victorian governess and its intrinsic relation with lunacy. My analysis of the novel aims at scrutinizing these antagonistic powers, as well as the discourse that each side sustains. Finally, I conclude that, although the novel illustrates a resistance against a hegemonic patriarchal discourse, it points to the permanence of that oppressive system and to the maintenance of the female in a passive position in society.
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This study investigates the relationship between Lacan’s theory of desire and Jay’s questing character in Hanif Kureishi’s novella, Intimacy. The paper argues that Intimacy explores the passionate desire hardly satisfied through social and familial relationships. When it is read in Lacanian terms, the narrative reveals that the protagonist’s unrelieved desire is fuelled by prolonged dissatisfaction. As the present paper will show, Intimacy portrays the protagonist as constantly fleeing from any kind of attachment. Presented as a self-producing motive, Jay’s desire acts in relation to the other, beyond language, law, and reality. Even though the desiring subject in Intimacy nearly achieves his demanded object, his ultimate satisfaction seems possible only in protracted fantasy.
Article
Shahrnush Parsipur (1946) is a celebrated and courageous Iranian novelist. This study deals with her controversial, epic novel Touba and the Meaning of Night (1989). The novel is analyzed based on Lacanian theory of subject formation and Cixousian concept of ‘ecriture feminine. In this essay a psychoanalytic-feminist discourse is used to intervene between a phallogocentric discourse and a feminist discourse. The pivotal aims of the study are to deconstruct Lacan’s concept of phallogocentrism, to redefine the concept of womanhood and to reconstruct feminine identity. According to the French psychoanalyst, Jacque Lacan, it is language that ultimately structures our conscious and unconscious mind and our identity. He introduced a tripartite scheme of psychic development: imaginary, symbolic and real. The symbolic order and its accompanying concept of phallogocentrism is the main focus of this study. By deconstructing symbolic phallus as the transcendental signified which signifies everything including female identity, the researcher’s aim is to focus on the need for a female framework and a feminine discourse free from male assumptions in order to reconstruct feminine identity. Helene Cixous, in her essay The Laugh of Medusa (1975), introduces a particular kind of female writing and tries to reconstruct the women’s shattered, colonized and marginalized identities in order to deconstruct the dominant symbolic order and phallocentric discourse. The task of this studyis to deal with and to follow the trace of masculine ideology and discourse in women’s identity in the novel Touba and the Meaning of Night. The study also, inspired by Helene Cixous’sprophecy of women’s experience of writing in a male dominated atmosphere claims that through deconstruction and break down of phallogocentrism, female subjects are constructed and a new discourse for women is established based on which they can reconstruct and forge their new identities. © 2015 Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Press. All rights reserved.
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This book brings together, explores and expands socio-spatial affect, emotion and psychoanalytic drives in tourism for the first time. Affect is to be found in visceral intensities and resonances that circulate around and shape encounters between and amongst tourists, local tourism representatives and places. When affect manifests, it can 'take shapes' in the form of emotions such as fun, joy, fear, anger and the like. When it remains a visceral force of latent bodily responses, affect overlaps with drives as expounded in psychoanalysis. The aim of the title, therefore, is to explore how and in what ways affects, emotions and drives are felt and performed in tourism encounters in places of socio-political turmoil such as Jordan, Palestine/Israel, with a detour to Iraq. Affective Tourism is highly innovative as it offers a new way of theorising tourism encounters bringing together, critically examining and expanding three areas of scholarship: affective and emotional geographies, psychoanalytic geographies and dark tourism. It has relevance for tourism industries in places in the proximity of ongoing conflicts as it provides in-depth analyses of the interconnections between tourism, danger and conflict. Such understandings can lead to more socio-culturally and politically-sustainable approaches to planning, development and management of tourism. This ground breaking book will be of valuable reading for students and researchers from a number of fields such as tourism studies, geography, anthropology, sociology and Middle Eastern studies.
Chapter
The history of computing before the electronic era is frequently reduced to the history of calculating and tabulating machines, which are a posteriori designated it as digital and therefore qualify to be considered direct ancestors of our electronic computer. As I perceive it, we face a two-dimensional historiographical challenge. We have to check if it is correct to privilege the history of computing with calculating and tabulating machines when it comes to the mechanical and the electrical eras. At the same time, we have to explain why computing with calculating and tabulating machines emerged as the privileged ancestor of electronic computing. The understudied history of the comparatively limited use of calculating and tabulating machines in engineering offers a contrast that is worth considering when it comes to address the aforementioned challenge. More specifically, in response to the first dimension of the aforementioned challenge, I will in this chapter present evidence that suggests that calculating and tabulating machines were not as important in engineering as we would expect based on the canonical emphasis on these machines as inherently technically superior. On the other hand, in response to the second dimension of this historiographical challenge, I will present evidence that shows that, in comparison to other computing artifacts of the 1914 Exhibition (e.g., in comparison to slide rules), calculating machines were more compatible with the pursuit of the further advancement of the capitalist division-of-computing labor.
Chapter
The post-structuralist rejection of both the text as an autonomous entity and the self as a wholeness present unto itself stems primarily from an intellectual approach to life and literature that neglects the finer feeling level of human perception. This level is central to Vedic literature (Veda means pure knowledge), which arranges the human faculties in order of increasing subtlty from the five senses to the mind, intellect, ego, and self (or pure consciousness).1 At its finest level of functioning, the intellect is experienced as a mode of feeling, which may also be described as intuition. The finest level of feeling is love or devotion, which unites the self and other, the absolute and relative.2 As a unifying force, feeling is closely related to memory, that quality of consciousness which enables it to be self-referral while remaining open to the mind and senses. The Manduka Upanishad classifies consciousness into three ordinary states — waking, sleeping, and dreaming — plus a higher, fourth state called transcendental pure consciousness, a self-referral state in which consciousness has no object other than itself.3 By linking oppositions such as subject and object, inside and outside, past and present, feeling and memory allow us to be open to the unity of transcendental consciousness and the diversity of the other faculties at the same time.
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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
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Kadi indicates a shift from the former twofold understanding of psychoanalysis as consisting of therapy and research towards a threefold arrangement that includes therapy, research and the production of a metapsychology. This shift along with the technological progress in the field of neuroscience creates a potentially productive conflict for a neuroscientific reformulation of psychoanalysis. The author identifies the human body in its various conceptions as being at the core of this conflict. The body is seen alternately as a Lacanian mirror image, as an organless body bordering between the biological and the psychical, and as a medical body constituted by colorful but decidedly fantastic images can be developed through state-of-the-art imaging technology. Over and against these conflicting tendencies, Kadi calls for psychoanalysis to attend to the relevance of the neurological body and consider its relation to other concepts of the human body, in order for psychoanalysis to remain true to its calling to make the unconscious conscious.
Article
Zen/Chan, which used to be a Far Eastern philosophy-cum-religion, has evolved into a global cultural phenomenon. Despite the many views expressed by numerous thinkers in the world, the consensus on Chan and Chan enlightenment remains an agnostic Oriental mysticism. By exploring Chan and enlightenment from a combined perspective of history, philosophy, psychology, religion and linguistics, this article proposes a hitherto unexpressed view. Chan enlightenment is a prenatal physico-psychological existence, which grows out of a fetal subject’s perception of the womb. Although this primordial mode of perception is unconscious, it is cosmic in nature because for the fetal subject the womb is the whole world with which it feels to be at one. This unconscious oneness may be termed the ‘cosmic unconscious’. Once born, no one can return to the prenatal mental state, but through personal cultivation and Chan practice one can experience a fleeting moment of the cosmic unconscious. In the final analysis, the essence of Chan enlightenment is a momentary return of the cosmic unconscious. It is, therefore, not a great wisdom which enables one to have a profound understanding of the self and the world, but a non-wisdom induced by a return to the prenatal primal being of life.
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Este es un estudio de los recursos retóricos usados por Dorotea, personaje de la novela «Don Quijote» (1.24, 28-30, 36-37, 46) de Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra.
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The centuries-long and widespread use of the slide rule qualifies it as one of the most important computing artifacts of historical capitalism to date. Yet, the literature on the history of computing with the slide rule is extremely limited. This chapter offers an introduction to the history of the slide rule based on the presentation of the slide rule in engineering and other technical texts. The emphasis is placed on retrieving and interpreting representative comparisons between the various versions of slide rules and between slide rules and other computing artifacts, mostly calculating machines (mechanical calculators).
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Anthropocentrism and the fact that some animals are just considered a means to an end while others are loved are often subject to criticism in animal ethics. Drawing on the psychoanalytic theories of Jacques Lacan, the author examines how the apparent ambivalence in human–animal relationships is based on different forms of enjoyment. Referring to the Real, the Symbolic and the Imaginary, which according to Lacan define human reality, the author shows how enjoyment and its limits shape, for example, how we think about pets, farm animals or wild animals. This alternative perspective will contribute to a better understanding of the challenges in human–animal relationships.
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From the perspective of the degree of mechanization (machine to human capital, constant to variable capital), some of the machines presented in this chapter should be placed at the one end of the spectrum of technologies of calculation-computation of the mechanical and electrical eras, whereas some of the graphs presented in Chap. 5 should be placed at the other. The calculating machines (mechanical calculators) presented in Chap. 6 and the slide rules presented in Chaps. 2 and 3 would fill the space in between. If we had to choose one name to refer to the great variety of the machines and associated mechanisms of this chapter, this would have to be “analyzer.”
Article
There are forms of enjoyment in Catullus that cannot be understood within the norms of pleasure as opposed to pain or unpleasure. This is an enjoyment that Freud would claim is beyond the pleasure principle, and thus integrally related to aggression, violence, and death: an enjoyment that is at once abject and sublime. Taking off from Mario Telò’s Archive Feelings, this paper examines these forms of enjoyment and how they function within the aesthetic structure of four poems by Catullus.
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En este trabajo se propone un modelo actancial de la obra maestra de Luis Vélez de Guevara, Reinar después de morir, publicada en 1652. Este esquema trata de solventar ciertos problemas de recepción, especialmente respecto al género de la comedia y el problemático ethos de sus personajes. El triunfo de Tánatos al final de la pieza, de propensión senequista, pone cierre, aparentemente, a una visión de la historia que solo podría sobreponerse bajo condiciones gubernamentales disímiles a las de los hechos lusitanos aquí representados. Si la redacción de la obra ocurrió entre 1636 y 1640, como apunta Henry W. Sullivan (144), o si 1635 es el terminus ad quem de la obra, como sugiere Donald R. Larson (20), Reinar pudiera indicar que los asuntos de Portugal, sin la continua colaboración del pueblo ibérico vecino, no podrían reavivarse. Esto explicaría el tono macabro y pesimista de la obra, la cual es una tragedia patética de dos mudanzas. Este proyecto se basa en varios modelos especulativos modificados: 1) el tipológico de Vladimir Propp, apto para la narrativa corta; el funcional de Étienne Souriau, utilizable para el drama; y el discursivo de Algirdas Julien Greimas, aplicable a la lingüística. Se han tomado en cuenta también dos modelos adicionales: el lógico de Keir Elam (98-134), basado en Souriau, y el estructural de Anne Ubserfeld (58-118), fundamentado en Greimas. Las modificaciones procuradas han sido las siguientes: 1) Se han delimitado los tipos de personajes de Propp (79-80), así como alterado varias modalidades que fueran acaso demasiado particulares para nuestros propósitos. 2) Se han mantenido las categorías nominales de Souriau, incluso sus notables denominaciones astrológicas, las cuales ayudan a captar, en forma objetiva y universal, como notó Elam, las funciones de los actantes nominales (Souriau, 83-112). 3) Se han aceptado las categorías de Greimas (207), las cuales son apropiadas para el discurso dramático, como planteara Ubersfeld. No obstante, las hemos modificado por clasificaciones esencialmente sintácticas. Por ende, el presente modelo consiste en las siguientes ordenaciones actanciales nominales, las cuales siguen la práctica de Tzvetan Todorov (7) de usar las letras mayúsculas finales del alfabeto europeo en uso: 1) la del (U) sujeto agentivo (el Héroe de Propp, el Lion o fuerza temática de Souriau o el Sujet de Greimas); 2) la del (V) sujeto disyuntivo (el Villano o Agresor de Propp, el Mars u Opositor de Souriau o el Opposant de Greimas); 3) la del (W) complemento acusativo (la Princesa y su Padre de Propp, el Soleil de Souriau o el Objet de Greimas); 4) la del (X) complemento dativo (el Remitente de Propp, la Terre de Souriau o el Destinataire de Greimas); 5) la del (Y) árbitro o complemento ablativo circunstancial (el Donador de Propp, la Balance de Souriau o el Destinateur de Greimas); y 6) la del (Z) ayudante o complemento comitativo (el Ayudante de Propp, la Lune de Souriau o el Adjuvant de Greimas). Z refleja a cualquiera de los otros actantes; por ende, su signo se coloca inmediatamente antes de este, con una barra (vírgula > 'y'), v. gr., Z/U (el ayudante del sujeto agentivo). Respecto a esta última categoría, propondríamos la función suplementaria ZZ para designar a un actante comitativo (Z) de función dupla (ZZ), como sería generalmente la figura del donaire de la comedia española. Dada su condición inestable (o dupla), proponemos la denominación de Mercurio. También proponemos una función suplementaria para Libra (Y), la de Escorpio o juez transcendental (YY). Esta función tiende a modificar la captación de la obra desde una perspectiva ulterior a la realizada por la figura habitual del juez (Y) o árbitro (Libra). Consta
Article
This essay examines the ways Graham Swift’s novel Shuttlecock critically examines the dialectical construction of masculinity as the discourse of the patriarchal Other. Foregrounding a Lacanian reading of the text which locates the absence of signification at the level of the Symbolic which then paradoxically produces imaginary figurations and fictions of desire, I read the novel as using the paradigm of espionage (itself premised on possessing and inhabiting the secret of the Other) as a powerful way of interrogating Prentis’ construction of his father’s masculinity as well as his own understanding of power and violence within the social economy of patriarchy. I argue that Lacan’s reading of psychoanalytic desire provides a useful paradigm through which to understand not only Prentis’ unconscious projection of Oedipal ambivalence against father figures such as Quinn, but also Swift’s deconstruction of the social and political constructs of masculine heroism as focalised through the war hero.
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This thesis study aims to analyze the poetry of two female poets who committed suicide, Sylvia Plath and Nilgün Marmara, within the context of the psychoanalytical perspectives to death and self-destruction. By rendering a psychoanalytical analysis of their poetical lines that are intermingled with pains and traumas centered around the obsession of death and self-destruction, this study attempts to trace and unearth the mutual poetical mechanisms of the unconscious and the human psyche that turn the poetry of both poets into ‘art of dying’ as in the wording of Plath and ‘swan songs’ as in the wording of Marmara. Emphasizing the undeniable attachment between Plath and Marmara, this study also investigates how the poetry of the American poet, Plath, as a predecessor has influenced the poetry of the Turkish poet, Marmara, as a successor and how their poetical approaches to death and suicide display resemblance, parallels and contrasts. By rendering a comparative analysis within the context of suicide, this thesis also aims to reflect that although their social and cultural contexts may vary, both female poets manifest that poetry has been a distinct sphere of both isolation and confrontation with the various psychic ‘demons’ inherent in their self-alienated poetical personas. Through psychoanalyzing their poetic personas in their ‘art of dying’, this study attempts to highlight how Plath and Marmara became both the victims and the victors of their poetry via various psychological scars and existential dilemmas. Keywords: death, suicide, psychoanalysis, poetry, Sylvia Plath, Nilgün Marmara.
Article
In Modernism, Ireland and the Erotics of Memory Nicholas Miller re-examines memory and its role in modern Irish culture. Arguing that a continuous renegotiation of memory is characteristic of Irish modernist writing, Miller investigates a series of case-studies in modern Irish historical imagination. He reassesses Ireland's self-construction through external or 'foreign' discourses such as the cinema, and proposes new readings of Yeats and Joyce as 'counter-memorialists'. Combining theoretical and historical approaches, Miller shows how the modernist handling of history transforms both memory and the story of the past by highlighting readers' investments in histories that are produced, specifically and concretely, through local acts of reading. This original study will attract scholars of Modernism, Irish studies, film and literary theory.
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Die Pädagogik der Inklusion ist, wie jede Pädagogik, auf Utopien angewiesen. In unserem Beitrag wird sich die Annahme einer Vollinklusion des Subjekts als ein sog. Bernfeldsches großes Wort und somit auch als Utopie erweisen. Wir untersuchen mögliche zugrundeliegende Phantasmen der Utopie einer Vollinklusion und arbeiten dabei auch die Kehrseiten dieser Utopie heraus. Als Referenzdisziplin dient uns hierbei die strukturale Psychoanalyse Jacques Lacans. Schlüsselwörter: Pädagogik der Inklusion, Inklusion, Utopie, Phantasma, Spiegelstadium, Lacan, Bernfeld --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Inclusive pedagogy, like all pedagogy, depends on utopias. In our contribution, inclusion will prove to be a so-called Bernfeldsche big word and thus also a utopia. We will examine possible underlying phantasms of the utopia of full inclusion and also work out the downsides of the utopia of full inclusion. We will use the structural psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan as our theoretical framework. Keywords: Inclusive Pedagogy, utopia, phantasm, Mirror Stage, Lacan, Bernfeld
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