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Northern Ireland's Creative Meshworks: Tracing Ad Hoc Knowledge Exchange

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Abstract

This paper draws on Ingold's [1] idea of " meshworks " to reveal the entanglements that shape the exchange of knowledge between arts and humanities researchers and the creative sector in Northern Ireland. It offers a view of the " interwoven lines of growth and movement " that affect the passing of ideas between practitioners and academics arguing that collaborations are ad hoc and encourage new forms of creativity and problem-solving. We do not offer a visualisation of the places and ways in which Northern Ireland's creative sector connects and collaborates. Rather, we identify the human and non-human assemblies that generate, facilitate, and give boundaries to knowledge exchange processes, and analyse these dynamics in the context of wireless cultures.
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