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Simulation of Dirty Floors in Consideration of Cleaning

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Abstract

A method of generating the textures of dirty floors is presented. First, the method computes the position and speed of each walker by simulating the behavior of the crowd. Then, footmarks caused by soil, dust, black grime on the floor and scratches caused by small stones are displayed. Footmarks and scratches are represented by adding shoe sole patterns and hair lines to the floor image, respectively. The amounts of dust and grime are increased with time. However, in the area stepped upon, their amounts are reduced by a fixed percentage. By implementing this, footmarks and scratches appearing at the center of the corridor are displayed. Dust and grime on the wall are displayed, too. In addition, dirty floors are cleaned up at regular intervals. We assumed daily and full cleaning. By repeated cleaning, the images of floors of old but well maintained buildings, on which only a lot of scratches are viewed, can be generated.

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