Article

The Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Topical Saw Palmetto and Trichogen Veg Complex for the Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia in Men

Article

The Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Topical Saw Palmetto and Trichogen Veg Complex for the Treatment of Androgenetic Alopecia in Men

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Abstract

Objective: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a special type, characterized with the follicular miniaturization of the frontal and parietal areas of scalp. In this study, we intended to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a hair lotion including saw palmetto and 10% trichogen veg complex (TVC) within male patients with AGA. Methods: Male patients, who treated with topical saw palmetto and TVC for four months between 2011-2012 were included to our study. Among the patient files, records of 25 patient were accepted available and taken into consideration according to the vertex photographs and tricoscan evaluations. Derived data were analyzed with SPSS program. Results: Total hair count was increased 11.9% compared with the pretreatment period. The final ratio of anagen/telogen hair was compared with the initials and the increase in ratio was 38%. According to the evaluation of vertex photographs, the observers declared that enhancement was noted in 48% of the patients and no difference was not noted in 36% of the patients. Conclusion: At the end of the study, topical saw palmetto and TVC were evaluated efficient and safe for the treatment of AGA. Randomized controlled trials among patient groups will reveal more conclusive data associated with topical saw palmetto and TVC.

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