Article

[Influence of feeding patterns on the development of teeth, dentition and jaw in children.]

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Abstract

Breastfeeding has been recognized as the most natural and nutritious way of feeding babies. Besides the nutritional, immunological and emotional benefits, breastfeeding promotes a healthy stomatognathic system. First of all, the nutrients and minerals in maternal milk are easy to be absorbed by the infants, which contributes to the mineralization of the teeth, and suppress the propagation of bacteria on the teeth. Though the jury is still out on whether breastfeeding can prevent Early Childhood Caries (ECC), it is definite that we should pay attention to feeding at night and the oral hygiene of the babies. Secondly, the method of feeding is closely bound up with the development of dentition and jaw. Breast- and bottle-feeding involve different orofacial muscles, which possibly have different effects on the harmonic growth of maxilla and dental arches. Meanwhile, breathing, swallowing and mastication should be developing in harmony, and differences exist in the learning of the coordinated movement between breast feeding and bottle feeding children. Bottle feeding had been proved to be closely related with the non-nutritive sucking habits which can cause malocclusion. At last, it should be pointed out that breast feeding should be the only feeding source in the first 6 months of life, then supplementary foods should be added. And prolonged bottle feeding should be avoided. We can see that breast feeding is definitely good for the infants, but the reality is not optimistic in our country.

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... Studies of various researchers have shown that milk and dairy products have multiple benefits for oral health [24,25]. Their role in prevention of dental pathology, such as caries and periodontal disease is well documented. ...
... Their role in prevention of dental pathology, such as caries and periodontal disease is well documented. It has been showed that milk contains a variety of bioactive peptides, as well calcium that play a key role in maintaining good health of teeth [24,25]. Recent study, among preschoolers, shows that children who were not breast-fed were at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic enamel changes [26]. ...
... Recent study, among preschoolers, shows that children who were not breast-fed were at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic enamel changes [26]. It has also been found that the act of sucking of mother's milk greatly contributes to the proper formation of the stomatognathic system of infants [25]. Besides undoubtedly great positive impact on oral health in the literature, there is evidence that human milk under certain conditions, like frequent (on demand) or nighttime feedings after the eruption of primary teeth, leads to acidogenic and cariogenic conditions that contribute to S-ECC [27,28]. ...
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Introduction During the first two years of life children’s nutrition is mostly based on frequent, liquid and sweetened meals which can cause Severe-Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC) development. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between dietary habits and S-ECC in children up to 24 month-old living in Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods Cross-sectional study included representative sample of 192 children. Before dental examination of children, each parent/caregiver was interviewed about the basic info, socio-demographic characteristics and children's eating habits. The questionnaire was conducted as interview (“face to face”). Subjects were divided into two groups: the first group - children with S-ECC and the second group - caries free children. For statistical analysis and presentation of results SPSS 16.0 for Windows, MS Office Word and Microsoft Office Excel were used. Results In the study sample 34.9% of children were suffering from S-ECC. About 50% of children who were breast-fed at night after first tooth eruption had S-ECC. The use of baby bottle with milk or other sweetened content during bedtime and during the night was identified as significant caries risk factor (P <0.05). Conclusion Nighttime breastfeeding, use of bottle with milk during bedtime/nighttime or other sweetened content during night after eruption of first primary tooth were strongly associated with S-ECC in the examined children.
... At present, there is no consensus related to the association between feeding habits and malocclusion. Previous studies have reported that there was influence of feeding patterns on the development of malocclusion [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][15][16][17][18][19][20]. According to some authors, breastfeeding and bottlefeeding involve different orofacial muscles, which possible have different effects on the harmonic growth of maxilla and dental arches. ...
... According to some authors, breastfeeding and bottlefeeding involve different orofacial muscles, which possible have different effects on the harmonic growth of maxilla and dental arches. Meanwhile, breathing, swallowing, and mastication should be developed in harmony, and differences exist in the learning of the coordinated movement between breastfeeding and bottlefeeding children [18]. ...
Article
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Background: This study aimed to explore the association between feeding habits, non-nutritive sucking habits, and malocclusions in deciduous dentition. Methods: A cross-sectional observational survey was carried out in 275 children aged 3 to 6 years and included clinical evaluations of malocclusions and structured interviews. Statistical significance for the association between feeding habits and the development of malocclusion was determined using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. In addition, odds ratio (OR) calculations were used for intergroup comparisons. Controlling for confounders was adjusted by excluding children with non-nutritive sucking habits. Results: The results indicated that there were no significant relationships between exclusive breastfeeding or bottlefeeding and the presence of any type of malocclusion (p > 0.05). There was also no significant association between breastfeeding or bottlefeeding duration and malocclusion (p > 0.05). In addition, it was observed that exclusive breastfeeding had a protective effect and diminished the risk of acquiring non-nutritive sucking habits (p = 0.001). Conclusions: There was no association between feeding habits and malocclusions in the deciduous dentition in this sample of children. Exclusive breastfeeding reduced the risk of acquiring non-nutritive sucking habits.
... Bottle feeding can have a harmonious growth effect on the teeth' jaws and arches. It is shown to occur malocclusion; thus, repeated use of bottle feeding should be avoided [12], although other studies suggest that bottle feeding has no significant correlation to jaw growth [13]. Several factors affect the impact of bad oral habits, including how much the bad habits are repeated daily (frequency), how long the bad habits are practiced (duration), how much pressure the child exerts (intensity), and the habit types [14]. ...
... Bottle feeding can have a harmonious growth effect on the teeth' jaws and arches. It is shown to occur malocclusion; thus, repeated use of bottle feeding should be avoided [12], although other studies suggest that bottle feeding has no significant correlation to jaw growth [13]. Several factors affect the impact of bad oral habits, including how much the bad habits are repeated daily (frequency), how long the bad habits are practiced (duration), how much pressure the child exerts (intensity), and the habit types [14]. ...
... Early life exposure to a wide variety of food textures is important to promote diversity in food preference and a broader texture acceptance (Coulthard et al. 2009). In the development of eating behaviors both bite force and mastication abilities are influenced by early-life texture experiences (Wang and Ge 2015) which in turn support the consumption of harder and more complex textures in later childhood (Gisel 1988). One recent study tracked infant texture acceptance longitudinally alongside oral development between 6 and 18 months (Demonteil et al. 2019). ...
Chapter
The modern food environment is often characterised by an increasingly assessable diet of inexpensive, energy-dense and highly palatable foods. Extensive evidence indicates the eating rate of foods (g/min or kcal/min) is associated with energy intake, body composition and the associated risk of food based non-communicable diseases. Moderating eating rate during food intake offers a simple but effective strategy to regulate energy consumption and body weight. Research evidence from population and experimental studies demonstrate that eating at a slower rate can produce sustained changes in ad-libitum energy intake, influence body composition and moderate our metabolic response to ingested nutrients. Understanding which factors combine to influence eating rates affords new opportunities to design ‘slower’ foods that can reduce the risk of over-consumption and support better long-term energy control. This chapter summarises the role of eating rate in energy intake and body composition, provides an overview of development of eating behaviours in infancy and childhood and describes the individual and food-based factors that can influence eating rate and its metabolic impact. The chapter provides a summary of research that has intervened to slow eating rate and demonstrates opportunities to support energy intake reductions using texture led changes to eating rate.
... According to functional matrix theory [8], persistent disequilibrium of stomatognathic system could result in malocclusion and craniofacial deformities, which has been verified in patients presenting mouth breathing habits [7] and swallowing disorders [6]. Masticatory function is also one of the most essential abilities conducted by orofacial system, and its abnormality seems to affect tooth eruption and render skeletal morphological changes in children and adolescents as well [9,10]. To date, many clinicians have witnessed that greater use of the jaw or more prolonged biting force could increase the dimension of dental arches [11]. ...
Article
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Mastication is the first step of food intake and digestion, which is a complex act that requires the participation of the whole functional stomatognathic system. Among all its components, teeth are regarded as the executor and take the main charge of mechanical food breakdown. Based on this, many researchers suspected that there is a mutual effect between malocclusion and masticatory function, and made efforts to figure out their interrelationships. Various studies have revealed that the alteration of occlusal patterns may decrease masticatory capability, and orthodontic treatment is an efficient solution. On the other hand, it is also detected by clinicians that masticatory anomalies can have a long-term impact on the formation of malocclusion and dentomaxillar deformities. But due to the complexity of stomatognathic system and the uncertainty of individual growth, this theory has not yet been sufficiently validated. Therefore, in order to define dental positions tuned to masticatory capabilities, it is necessary to understand how different associated factors including the properties of food textures, masticatory muscles, bite forces and chewing patterns affect dental positions and craniofacial growth in the long run. This review is determined to summarize the previous evidence and try to illustrate a potential rule so as to avoid postponed intervention and correction of subsequent masticatory dysfunction and malocclusion.
... There is also a strong learned component to the development of stable eating behaviours and appetitive traits, and children's trajectory of learning to eat is influenced by their early experiences with food and the family feeding environment. Feeding practices such as breast-feeding (70) and the timing of complementary food introduction (71) may interact with genetic risk to influence food texture acceptance, orofacial muscle development and oral stamina (72) . Parental feeding practices such as verbal or physical prompting to eat during a meal have also been linked to promoting faster eating rates and higher energy intakes and may influence overweight and healthy weight children differently (73) . ...
Article
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Faster eating rates are associated with increased energy intake, but little is known about the relationship between children’s eating rate, food intake and adiposity. We examined whether children who eat faster consume more energy and whether this is associated with higher weight status and adiposity. We hypothesised that eating rate mediates the relationship between child weight and ad libitum energy intake. Children ( n 386) from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes cohort participated in a video-recorded ad libitum lunch at 4·5 years to measure acute energy intake. Videos were coded for three eating-behaviours (bites, chews and swallows) to derive a measure of eating rate (g/min). BMI and anthropometric indices of adiposity were measured. A subset of children underwent MRI scanning ( n 153) to measure abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adiposity. Children above/below the median eating rate were categorised as slower and faster eaters, and compared across body composition measures. There was a strong positive relationship between eating rate and energy intake ( r 0·61, P <0·001) and a positive linear relationship between eating rate and children’s BMI status. Faster eaters consumed 75 % more energy content than slower eating children (Δ548 kJ (Δ131 kcal); 95 % CI 107·6, 154·4, P <0·001), and had higher whole-body ( P <0·05) and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity (Δ118·3 cc; 95 % CI 24·0, 212·7, P =0·014). Mediation analysis showed that eating rate mediates the link between child weight and energy intake during a meal ( b 13·59; 95 % CI 7·48, 21·83). Children who ate faster had higher energy intake, and this was associated with increased BMI z -score and adiposity.
... Dental decay has a high incidence on children in China and progress in decay prevention, diagnosis, and treatment is not reflected in children's and adolescents' oral health. [1] Dental decay has been proven to decrease quality of life by causing pain and engendering-specific eating behaviors and particular ways of speech or smile. [2] Therefore, appropriate and reliable treatments are required. ...
Article
Our goal was to evaluate how dental treatments under general anesthesia (GA) affect the quality of life by a prospective pair-matched design. Pediatric patients, who had received dental treatments under GA, were enrolled and were asked to complete the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) before the treatment and 1 month after the treatment. To shield the observed impacts, a pair-matched control group was performed. Patients in the control group were also required to complete the ECOHIS at these different points in time. In both groups, the items of troubled sleep and oral/dental pain scored highest, whereas avoiding smiling or laughing and avoiding talking scored lowest before the treatment. The total mean score in the 2 groups was 13.1 and 13.7, respectively, and there was no significant statistical difference (P > 0.05). However, the total mean score was 1.9 in the experimental group after the treatment and smaller compared with the control group (1.9 vs. 4.7, P < 0.001). The majority of the items in both groups had an apparent effect size and the total mean effect in the experimental group was greater than that in the control group (85.5% vs. 65.7%, P < 0.001). Therefore, dental treatment under GA could provide better quality of life restoration compared with treatment over multiple visits.
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