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Online Social Networking Profiles and Self-presentation of Indian Youths

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Abstract

The central aim of this study is to determine whether online social interactions, online postings and self-presentations in profiles of Indian youths between the ages of 16 and 18 years conform to the previously well-guarded culture and traditional norms of India. It is based on the analysis of user profiles on ten social networking sites: Facebook, MySpace, Hi5, Orkut, Ibibo, Perfspot, Google+, LinkedIn, Bharatstudent and Twitter. We learn that the level of self-disclosure on profiles is higher among male than female teenagers in India. Also, young men engage more in discussions related to socially risky activities like drinking, smoking and sex-related issues via social media than young women. The significance of these and other findings are discussed.

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