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The Relationship Closeness Induction Task

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Abstract

Presents the Relationship Closeness Induction Task (RCIT), a structured self-disclosure procedure for the induction of relationship closeness in the laboratory. The RCIT consists of 29 questions, which become progressively more personal, and requires 9 min to administer. The validity of the RCIT has been previously demonstrated in several experiments, in which it fostered high levels of relationship closeness, induced high levels of group entitativity, and allowed participants adequate privacy and comfort. The RCIT affords the researcher with several advantages, such as theory-testing potential, avoidance of methodological pitfalls, and convenience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
... The question list contained 30 questions, most of which were borrowed verbatim from the Closeness-Generating Inventory (Aron et al., 1997) and the Relationship Closeness Induction task (Sedikides et al., 1999), and some of which were generated by the authors. These questions varied in intensity and valence and therefore represented the self-disclosure experimental manipulations (i.e., positive/high intensity, positive/low intensity, negative/ high intensity, and negative/low intensity). ...
... Instead of posing each other questions, the child and robot could, for instance, take turns telling each other about pre-determined topics. This approach has widely been used in social-psychological research (see Aron, Melinat, Aron, Vallone, & Bator, 1997;Sedikides, Campbell, Reader, & Elliot, 1999 for interaction tasks designed to induce interpersonal closeness). ...
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