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Identity, Youth, and Crisis

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... Conducting a study of how people talk about friendship in older age ranges than those that currently dominate friendship research (i.e., not 0-35 years old) may make an important contribution to the field of friendship and mental health. The start of middle-age, from 40 years old, is a stage of personal development characterised by less focus on identity-formation in relationships and friendships than in previous decades of life (Erikson, 1968;Sullivan, 1953), and more on the development of capacities for caring for others and contributing to civic/social life. The viewpoint of middle-age on friendship and mental health may therefore present different data than that from younger cohorts. ...
... Given that adults in later years (60 years and older) are associated with a different stage of life in which there is a process of self-reflection on the development of one's life generally (potentially resulting in despair or satisfaction, or an identity that feels integrated; Erikson, 1968) and a more detached approach to living, an age limit of 60 was imposed. This was not to suggest that friendship was not important for people over the age of 60. ...
... Stories also impressed a need to be recognised as a person who has achieved major milestones by middle-age, and a need to not be misrecognised as a person of less worth due to their circumstances or experiences of distress (similar to the concerns of Erikson's (1968) late adult stage of "integrity v despair"). In particular, while passionate attraction and sexual desire still occurred in the stories of middle-age friendship, participants sought friendship as a means to validate and "touch base" in the present after achieving, or expected to have achieved, "romantic", "parental" and intimate, "companionate" love. ...
Article
Research, theory and mental health policy draws attention to the importance of family, social networks, community, employers and learning contexts in maintaining mental health and inclusion. Yet the meaningful complexities of friendship to psychological health and public policy has not received sustained analysis, and policy emphasis is often restricted towards family relations. This study explores the friendship-experiences of seventeen people who have endured mental health difficulties, through a critical narrative inquiry of their stories of friendship. A hermeneutics of suspicion, involving stigma, feminist and mad studies is used to explore meaning within the narratives. The study reveals the participants’ stories of problems of daily living, illness and stigma, of friendship as freedom and recognition, and friendship’s contribution to personal agency and establishing a valued position in society. The study develops a perspective of how compassion in friendship has helped articulate and reframe identities to one’s self, to others, and to distress, and therefore the potential contribution of friendship to living with mental distress. The thesis argues that mental health studies have been dominated by institutionalised relationships, of which friendship has been made to fit into theoretical frameworks of family- and kin-relationships. The thesis presents an alternative view of friendship to aid in the reformulation of the varieties of social relationships shared by people through mental distress. Additionally, there have been very few narrative studies that explore the friendship experiences of people with mental ill health and this study adds to a growing literature.
... Identity is one of the fundamental concepts in the human experience because it helps us understand who we are as individuals and as organizations (Bartunek, 1984;Weick, 1995). Identity has been defined as those features that are core to one's "self," have continuity over time, and make one distinct from similar others (Erikson, 1968). Given the birth-to-death nature of our data, as well as the long-time frames involved in the processes responsible for the ultimate undoing of Rebelient's identity, it is important that we viewed identity as a process an organization undergoes, rather than a "thing" an organization has. ...
... Although not previously captured empirically at the organizational level, a related phenomenon has been documented at the individual level. As noted in the introductory epigram, Erikson (1968) observed that some soldiers returning from war had been so profoundly affected by the experience that they had actually lost their identities, unable to reconcile who they had been when they left with who they had become when they returned from war. They were so unsettled that they became strangers even to themselves (see Silverstein, 1994;Whetten, 2006). ...
... Our findings show how identity loss is experienced at an organizational level when an organization loses the features that make it distinct from other similar organizations. To address these findings, it is important to note that identity has been portrayed as a three-legged stool involving features that are (1) central or core to an organization, (2) have some continuity over time, and (3) provide a sense of distinctiveness from similar others (Albert &Whetten, 1985;Erikson, 1968). This conceptualization implies that if any essential feature is lost, identity itself will be undermined and a person or organization will experience the loss of a sense of who they are (Albert & Whetten, 1985;Whetten, 2006). ...
Article
We conducted a 10-year longitudinal study of the formation and change of an organization’s identity over its complete life-cycle, from birth to death. Over this time, the organization (“Rebelient”) went through several identity transitions wherein members of the organization came to understand that who they wanted to be as an organization was not possible because of differing expectations held by various inside and outside stakeholder groups. Discrepancies arising from those difficult-to-meet expectations led to repeated cycles of adaptive sensemaking, as members sought to understand what was happening. Our analysis of Rebelient’s identity transitions focuses primarily on a subtle form of adaptive sensemaking (semantic sensemaking) as a way not only to advance our understanding of intangible processes involved in identity transitions, but also to investigate an underexplored realm of sensemaking. Our findings have implications for the study of both organizational identity and adaptive sensemaking. Keywords: identity formation and change, sensemaking, organizational change, qualitative research
... Adolescence is a crucial period for self and identity development, including physical, psychological and social changes (Marcia, 1987). These changes theoretically lead adolescents to ask 'Who am I?' (Erikson, 1968) and develop an integrated understanding of their identity. Whilst the process of identity development begins in childhood, it becomes a primary concern during adolescence and the identities created in childhood may be altered (Erikson, 1968). ...
... These changes theoretically lead adolescents to ask 'Who am I?' (Erikson, 1968) and develop an integrated understanding of their identity. Whilst the process of identity development begins in childhood, it becomes a primary concern during adolescence and the identities created in childhood may be altered (Erikson, 1968). ...
Preprint
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Background and objective: Cannabis use during adolescence is common. Cannabis use and identity are thought to influence one another. This study aimed to examine what London-based adolescents (aged 16-17 years) think about cannabis use, its relationships with identity, and its benefits and harms. Method: Three semi-structured focus groups interviews were conducted, two with adolescents who use cannabis (n=3 and n=5) and one with adolescents who do not use cannabis (n=6). Participants also completed a drug-use questionnaire. Results: Thematic analysis (TA) revealed four identities. Two identities emerged from both groups: ′The person who uses cannabis is chilled′ and ′The person who uses cannabis is sometimes ostracised′. Two identities emerged from the group of adolescents who used cannabis: ′The person who uses cannabis is an expert in risky things′ and ′The person who uses cannabis is not addicted ′. Skunk was identified as potentially more harmful than hash, but more powerful and pleasurable. Conclusion: The findings provide insight into how cannabis use shape personal and social identity amongst teenagers in London in the late 2010s. Those who use cannabis described the benefits of cannabis, including socialising and for relaxation, and emphasised they are not addicted. Stigmatising and devaluing attitudes were held by some non-users about adolescents who use cannabis. Stereotypes seem to still exist, despite cannabis normalisation. Implications for research and policy are outlined.
... Eriksson believes that cultural identity refers to the positive recognition of the most meaningful things of the nation formed by the members of a group living together in the national community for a long time. Hall regards cultural identity as a dynamic and constantly constructing production process (Erikson, 1968). It is a cultural identity reached by people after the subjects form the same view of the world through the interaction between the subjects and other subjects. ...
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In previous studies, as an important object of inheritance and promotion of Chinese culture in Chinese colleges and universities, the psychological change mechanism of college students in the process of receiving cultural identity education has not attracted widespread attention. This study focuses on ideological and political education in colleges and universities, and innovatively believes that in order to improve college students’ identification with Chinese culture, and make them consciously “internalize in mind and externalize in practice,” it is necessary to explore their psychological structure and mechanism of action in the process of accepting identity education and take measures to actively intervene. The study employs the method of questionnaire investigation, acquiring 1,119 effective samples from 30 universities in Fujian province. By establishing the theoretical framework of “cognitive identity—emotional identity—ideological identity—behavioral identity,” analyzing and examining the data, it is found out that: (1) cognitive identity affecting behavioral identity positively in a noticeable way; (2) by raising individual emotional identity, cognitive identity strengthening university students’ behavioral identity; (3) cognitive identity inspiring behavioral identity with benefits of ideological identity; (4) it being verified that there exists an intermediary chain reaction between emotional identity, ideological identity, cognitive identity, and behavioral identity. As a result, the followings are proposed: (1) further integrating the worthy Chinese traditional culture into university curriculum and developing students’ cognitive education of traditional culture; (2) exploring the aesthetic dimension of worthy Chinese traditional culture and deepening the students’ emotional identity of traditional culture; (3) demonstrating the essence of the worthy Chinese traditional culture and advancing the students’ ideological identity of traditional culture; and (4) intensifying the practice of the worthy Chinese traditional culture and motivating the students’ behavioral identity of traditional culture.
... This study is guided by eclectic theories of psychoanalytic, psychosocial and the needs theory (Freud, 1917;Erikson, 1968;Maslow, 1954 ...
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This research investigated the relationship between physical spousal abuse and emotional homeostatic disequilibrium among married secondary school teachers in Bayelsa State of Nigeria. The moderating impact of gender in the relationship between physical spousal abuse and emotional homeostatic disequilibrium was also investigated. The study’s population was all married secondary school teachers in Bayelsa State of Nigeria, about 7,851, out of which 720 (10.9%) were chosen through a stratified random sampling technique for the investigation. Two instruments namely the Physical Spousal Abuse Scale (PSAS) and Emotional Homeostatic Disequilibrium Scale (EHDS) were used for data collection. Cronbach Alpha was utilized to test the reliability coefficients of both instruments which yielded α =.75 and α = .99 respectively for PSAS and EHDS. Two research questions, as well as two null hypotheses, guided the research. Correlation and regression statistics were utilized to answer the research questions and to test all the hypotheses at a 0.05 level of significance. The study results revealed that physical spousal abuse has a significant relationship with emotional homeostatic disequilibrium, and that gender has a significant moderating impact on the relationship between physical spousal abuse and emotional homeostatic disequilibrium among married secondary school teachers in Bayelsa State of Nigeria. Following the results of the research, it was recommended that counselling psychologists and people in other helping professions should work concertedly to eliminate the EHD phenomenon from the marriages of secondary school teachers in Bayelsa State of Nigeria.
... Therefore, it may be assumed that the groups, apart from being divisible in terms of the overall score, also differ in the specificity of their responses and thus functioning within the features that correspond to the sensory processing sensitivity. The results obtained indicate that the intensification of certain behaviours related to sensitivity (such as anxiety or feeling unwell when facing multiple tasks in a short time or at the same time) may be characteristic not only for highly sensitive people but also for the developmental period associated with emotional lability and often indicates a change in the threshold of responsiveness (cf., [47,48]). A question arises about the differences in the sizes of the groups with different sensitivity levels. ...
Article
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The research described herein is based on the assumptions of the sensory processing sensitivity concept and the meta framework for the concept of environmental sensitivity. The adopted theoretical framework shows that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the environment, with some being more sensitive than others. From the evolutionary perspective, it has also been assumed that sensory processing sensitivity follows a normal distribution in the population, with a minority being exceptionally or highly sensitive to environmental stimuli. We explored data from a sample of 928 young adolescents in two studies. The tool used to evaluate their sensitivity was the Highly Sensitive Child Scale, which in studies 1 and 2 had a three-factor structure. Latent class analysis was used for the interpretation of the data of the studied groups. The obtained results indicate the existence of three groups which differ significantly from each other according to the HSC result. Based on the obtained results, it may be assumed that young adolescents are divided into three groups characterized by different sensitivities and their percentage distribution is not in agreement with the research conducted to date. The acquired information has both a theoretical value and a practical applicability, prompting reflection about the different aspects of the study, such as cultural differences, changes related to the development stage and the characteristics of the evaluation tool itself. From the perspective of possible applications, the obtained results may provide important information (1) to decision-makers who plan support or intervention programs at various levels of prevention, (2) for practitioners to provide them with the means with which to consider sensitivity as an important factor in coping with difficulties through diversified and adequate support (3) that is broadly applicable in the face of an environmental crisis (pandemic, the changing structure of class groups which is related to the number of refugees).
... "Benlik, bireyin kendisiyle ilgili olarak kafasında çizdiği görünümdür ve bu görünüm, bireyin kendisine güvenli olup olmayacağını, içe ya da dışa dönük oluşunu belirler" (Baldwin & Hoffman, 2002;Yavuzer, 2004). Markus ve Zajonc (1985), benlik kavramını insanın temel yapıtaşı olarak psikolojik açıdan ele alırken, Erikson (1968) da, benzer şekilde psikolojik stres ve içsel mücadelenin ortaya çıkmasında benliğin rol oynadığını belirtmektedir. Benliğin tıpkı insanın aynaya baktığında kendini görmesi ve kendi karakterini oluşturan parçaları tanımlamaya çalıştığı bir kavram olduğu söylenebilir. ...
Thesis
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Endüstri Devriminden sonra yaşanan gelişmeler sonucunda bireyler tüketime odaklı bir şekilde yaşamaya başlamıştır. Tüketime odaklı olarak yaşam standartları değişen tüketicinin, tatmin etmek istediği ihtiyaçları da değişmiştir. Zorunlu ihtiyaçlarının yanı sıra tüketiciler toplum içinde var olmak, eğlenmek, mutlu olmak gibi çok çeşitli nedenlerden dolayı tüketme eylemini gerçekleştirmek istemiştir. Fakat tüketicinin bu eylemlerinin, dünya üzerinde yaşayan diğer canlıların hayatını tehlikeye attığı görülmüştür. Tüketicinin demografik özelliklerine bağlı olarak karar verme tarzlarının zamanla değişim göstermesi sürdürülebilir tüketim davranışının ortaya çıkmasına neden olmuştur. Bu yüzden demografik özelliklerin tüketici karar verme tarzları ile sürdürülebilir tüketim davranışı üzerindeki etkisinin ele alınması gerektiği düşünülmüştür. Bu bağlamda demografik özelliklerin tüketici karar verme tarzları ile sürdürülebilir tüketim davranışı üzerinde nasıl bir etkisinin olduğunu tespit etmek araştırmanın amacını oluşturmuştur. Bu amaç doğrultusunda, araştırmanın evreni İzmir'de nüfus yoğunluğunun en fazla olduğu 6 ilçe olarak belirlenmiştir. Bu evrenden kota örnekleme yöntemine göre 598 kişi araştırma anketine katılmıştır. Araştırma verilerinin analizi SPSS 22 ve AMOS 21 programlarında gerçekleştirilmiştir. Yapılan analizler sonucunda, demografik özelliklerin hem tüketici karar verme tarzları hem de sürdürülebilir tüketim davranışında oldukça önemli olduğu görülmüştür. Aynı zamanda tüketici karar verme tarzları ile sürdürülebilir tüketim davranışı arasında hem pozitif hem de negatif bir ilişkinin olduğu sonucuna ulaşılmıştır.
... Desde esta perspectiva, todos los individuos buscan conocerse a sí mismos a partir de la comparación con los otros, es decir, los demás son una referencia (Jenkins, 2014). Algunos psicólogos pioneros estudiaron la identidad y su repercusión en la salud mental de los individuos, por ejemplo, Freud fundamentó el desarrollo psicosexual en la identificación exitosa de los niños con sus padres (Stevenson, 2001); Erikson (1968) desarrolló tu teoría sobre la personalidad con base en el desempeño de los individuos a las necesidades y exigencias sociales; Vygotsky (1979) propuso su teoría del desarrollo social en la que la interacción social es base del aprendizaje; Piaget (1972) describió el desarrollo sexual durante la adolescencia; Bandura et al. (1961) propusieron su teoría sobre el aprendizaje social que se fundamenta en la imitación; y Tajfel y Turner (1986) desarrollaron la teoría de la identidad social que exalta el rol de la pertenencia al grupo como parte del desarrollo humano. Los aportes de la ciencia y la cultura en la educación para la salud sobre las identidades sexuales María de los Ángeles Covarrubias Bermúdez y Marco Antonio Zavala González Durante años se han diferenciado identidades específicas que ayudan a los individuos a lograr el proceso de identificación e individualización, entre ellas se encuentra la identidad etaria, personal, cultural, política, religiosa, profesional, racial y sexual. ...
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Esta obra ofrece siete experiencias de investigación e intervenciones educativas en salud, con el objetivo de ser usados como materiales para la enseñanza en la formación de profesionales en gerontología, salud pública, nutrición y medicina. Su enfoque interdisciplinario favorece la comprensión e integración de la complejidad de los problemas de salud actuales. Los autores desarrollaron cada capítulo de manera didáctica, con el fin de aportar experiencias de investigación en temas tan diversos como las condiciones de un sector de la población frente a la muerte, las formas de creación de significados culturales —ya sea a través de artefactos artesanales o la construcción de la propia identidad sexual—, el contexto del cuidado a personas adultas mayores, los riesgos laborales de quienes participan en el proceso enseñanza-aprendizaje o las condiciones actuales del tratamiento de un bien vital para la vida humana: el agua.
... Self-identity formation is one of the developmental tasks in adolescence and matures in young adulthood. A matured self-identity includes the acceptance of physical changes, development of social and emotional competencies and self-efficacy, and the balance between autonomy and interdependence [37]. People who attain the full process of personality development and consolidate their self-identity can own consistent beliefs and values across time and contexts, indicating having established independent and emancipated self-identity [38]. ...
Article
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Background The mediators of the association between familial attitudes toward sexual orientation and internalized homonegativity among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals have not been well examined. Methods A cross-sectional survey study was carried out to examine the (i) associations of familial sexual stigma and family support with internalized homonegativity among young adult LGB individuals in Taiwan, and (ii) mediating effect of self-identity disturbance and the moderating effect of gender. Self-identified LGB individuals (N = 1000; 50% males and 50% females; mean age = 24.6 years) participated in the study. Familial sexual stigma, family support, self-identity disturbance, and internalized homonegativity were assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to examine relationships between the variables. Results The results indicated that familial sexual stigma was directly associated with increased internalized homonegativity, and indirectly associated with increased internalized homonegativity via the mediation of self-identity disturbance among LGB individuals. Family support was indirectly associated with decreased internalized homonegativity via the mediation of low self-identity disturbance. The direct association between family support and internalized homonegativity was only found among lesbian and bisexual women but not among gay and bisexual men. Conclusions Program interventions for familial sexual stigma, family support, and self-identity disturbance are warranted to help reduce internalized homonegativity among LGB individuals.
... A central developmental task for older adolescents transitioning to adulthood involves exploring potential identities and making provisional identity commitments (Erikson, 1968;Schwartz et al., 2013;Waters & Fivush, 2015). More mature identity development involves a combination of high levels of exploration and commitment (Carlsson et al., 2015;Eriksson et al., 2020;Luyckx, Klimstra, Duriez, et al., 2012;Marcia, 1966). ...
Preprint
First-year college students in the 2019-2020 academic year are at risk of having their mentalhealth, identity work, and college careers derailed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. To assess emerging and evolving impacts of the pandemic on mental health/well-being, identity development, and academic resilience, we collected data from a racially, ethnically, geographically, and economically diverse group of 629 students at 4 universities across the US within weeks of lockdown, and then followed up on these students’ self-reported mental health, identity, and academic resilience three times over the following year. Our findings suggest that: 1) students’ mental health, identity development, and academic resilience were largely negatively impacted compared to pre-pandemic samples; 2) these alterations persisted and, in some cases, worsened as the pandemic wore on; and 3) patterns of change were often worse for students indicating more baseline COVID-related stressors.
... According to Erikson's (1968) Psychosocial Development Theory as an adopted and comprehensive theory that deals with stages of life, late teens struggle with "role confusion versus identity," while those in their midtwenties struggle with "isolation versus intimacy" conflicts. Although Erikson speaks of such irrefutably significant and easily observable conflicts, it cannot be ignored that the phases of the individual's transition from adolescence to adulthood, associated with longer education and thus separation from the family, the opportunity to make one's own decisions without the influence of the family, and the attainment of economic independence, are shifted to later ages.In light of this, it would not be false to claim that individuals aged 18and 25 may experience interwoven conflicts of role confusion versus gaining identity and isolation versus intimacy. ...
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This study aimed to examine the mediator role of self-compassion in the relationship between self-concept and communication skills of emerging adults, using a correlational research survey method to survey the impressions of 206 university students from various institutions across Turkey. The respondents were asked to fill out Social Comparison Scale, Self-Compassion Scale, and Communication Skills Scale to reveal that self-compassion partially mediated the relationship between self-concept and communication skills. Bootstrapping also showed that the indirect effect of self-concept on communication skills through self-compassion was significant. Individuals between adulthood and adolescence were found to perform the tasks expected of adolescence and ensure quality and satisfaction in life after graduation.The results revealed the connection between strong communication skills and positive self-concept and the fact that this connection can be addressed through self-compassion. Given that the most common reasons for university students to apply for psychological counseling concern problems around self-concept and communication/socialization, the inclusion of psycho-educational content in the concept of self-compassion in programs related to communication skills, using methods such as self-compassion awareness exercises can make a significant contribution in practice.
... With implications for practice, a vast work on meaning (McLean & Thorne, 2003;Thorne et al., 2004;Park & George, 2016) and on the way humans organize thought in the form of narratives (Erikson, 1968;Gergen & Gergen, 1988;Bruner, 1990;White & Epston, 1990;Guidano, 1991;Neimeyer & Levitt, 2001;Pals & McAdams, 2004;Savickas, 2005;Thompson, 2010;Ferretti, 2018) has been developed in the field of Psychology over time. In career counselling, developmental-contextualist, critical-constructivist and narrative-hermeneutic paradigms emerged as a response to a reductionist and dualist (subject-world) way of placing the problem of "guidance". ...
Article
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Having Gilles Deleuze’s “Logique du sens” as a reference, we propose a deep appreciation of the concepts of signification, meaning and sense that may affect the understanding of some key constructs of Vocational Psychology with implications for career guidance. The purpose is to grasp the concept of sense from a certain indistinctness that seems to pervade the theoretical corpus of Psychology in general, and Vocational Psychology in particular. First, we emphasize the tradition of research and practice in vocational psychological guidance and dive into the vocational characterisation of those constructs. Then, we propose a way of looking at these concepts as a phenomenon and event for vocational development. Our intention was to put the phenomenological questioning at the centre of the psychological practices and lead a reflection around language that goes beyond a purely symptomatic and empirical understanding, a reflection that grasps its collapse from the casuistry of narratives.
... First, it leads to consistency among the elements which helps in facilitating a clear, unequivocal and efficient course of action (Jones and Gerard 1967). Second, it has a quality of wholeness, continuity and unity (Erikson 1968), and this is seen most frequently in Western Cultures (Suh, 2002). According to the vast research being done in the areas of social and personality psychology, it was found that self-congruence is attained when one cognitively aligns the hypothetical or idealized selves with the actual self (Higgins 1989; Markus and Nurius 1986). ...
Article
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Over the past few decades, the world has witnessed wars and conflicts between the nations and even within a nation. Harmony is needed before anything as it is the ground on which the strong pillar of a nation stands. In India, Jammu and Kashmir over the decades has witnessed huge amounts of violence and terrorism. This study has been done with the intent to explore the relationship between self and other orientation, life satisfaction, coping strategies and educational background. In a sample of 378 individuals (187 males and 191 females), a moderated meditational model was tested using influence of (self and other) on life satisfaction mediated by coping strategies and moderated by educational background. Results showed that Orientation (Self and Others) had a direct positive association with life satisfaction, ways of coping strongly mediate the relation between orientation (self and other) and life satisfaction and the educational background reduces the strength of the relationship between orientation and life satisfaction. Individual orientation towards self and others strongly influence and associate with their ways of coping and the level of life satisfaction which further mold with educational background.
... The adult provides for the young through care, whereas the young fulfil the adult's basic desire to be needed through generativity. Erikson (1968) writes, "Mature man needs to be needed, and maturity needs guidance as well as encouragement from what has been produced and must be taken care of. Generativity, then, is primarily the concern in establishing and guiding the next generation, although there are individuals who, through misfortune or because of special and genuine gifts in other directions, do not apply this drive to their own offspring. ...
Article
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This paper uses the concept of generativity to challenge the ageist view of older adults' reduced social and economic contributions in a neoliberal economy and support an age-integrated society. It revisits Erik Erikson's life cycle theory and brings forth the argument that the core quality of the seventh stage of human ego development, generativity vs stagnation, transverses all previous developmental stages and creates a forever-moving life cycle through intergenerational connections. Generativity is critical to human ageing as it is closely linked to notions of transfer of knowledge. This paper investigates generativity in relation to ego, libido and ageing. It discusses the ego as the medium of generativity and libido as its source of energy. It also explores how opportunities for intergenerational exchange, transfer of knowledge, and creativity are fashioned to suit the larger economic and socio-cultural context through sublimation. The paper concludes that generativity is the most promising route to an age-friendly society.
... We situated this investigation in urban U.S. high school physics and chemistry classes serving primarily students of color from modest income backgrounds, for whom research on the links between teachers' autonomy supportive or controlling practices and engagement has been limited. We also focused specifically on the classroom experiences of adolescents, as gaining greater autonomy, agency, individuation, and independence are key developmental tasks during adolescence (Eccles et al., 1993;Erikson, 1968;Hill & Holmbeck, 1986). Given that students' gender, racial-cultural experiences, and prior achievement are all likely to have potential implications for their agentic beliefs, agentic behavior, and experiences of teacher support or control, particularly in the science context (e.g., Beasley & Fischer, 2012;Wang & Degol, 2013), an additional goal of the current research was to examine the extent to which the relationships among students' agency and their perceptions of teacher practice vary by students' characteristics. ...
Article
Students’ agentic engagement and teachers’ autonomy support represent powerful reciprocal factors that can influence academic outcomes. However, little is known about the extent to which students’ agentic mindset reciprocally relates to agentic engagement and teachers’ practice or the parallel role of teacher control, particularly among ethnically diverse urban students. The current investigation examined reciprocal relations between urban U.S. high school science students’ agentic mindset, agentic engagement, and perceived teacher autonomy support and control over time. Cross-lagged structural equation models indicated that agentic mindset, agentic engagement, and perceived teacher practice reciprocally relate. Agentic engagement predicted increases in agentic mindset. Perceived teacher autonomy support predicted increases in agentic mindset and agentic engagement. Agentic mindset predicted decreases in perceived teacher control and vice versa. Moderator analyses suggested that relations varied depending on prior achievement and stereotype vulnerability, but not gender. Specifically, perceived support increased the agentic engagement more for low versus high stereotype vulnerable students. Predicted relations were also stronger and more adaptive for higher achieving compared to lower achieving students, with adaptive relationships from mindset to engagement and from engagement to perceived teacher practice emerging only for high achieving students. Implications for theory, future research, and practice are discussed.
... Identity development. Identity development is a central developmental task during adolescence (Erikson, 1968). Online environments can be important platforms for identity development among SGMY DeHaan et al., 2013;Hatchel, 2016), where youth are able to learn about different sexual and gender minority identities and communities, meet other peers with the same or similar identities, and try out emerging identities in contexts where they can remain anonymous. ...
Article
Adolescents, in general, are spending more time in online environments, and understanding how youth navigate these contexts may be particularly important for addressing and improving outcomes among sexual and gender minority youth. Taking a developmental perspective, this review discusses online environments as contexts of both risk and resilience for youth in gender and sexual minority communities. In particular, we review literature highlighting how online environments provide a context for many salient aspects of adolescent development, including the promotion of identity development and the exploration of intimate, romantic and sexual behavior. The potential for online environments to serve as contexts for discrimination and victimization for gender and sexual minority youth are also discussed. Specific recommendations for parents, teachers and sexual and gender minority youth themselves are made for creating and promoting positive wellbeing in online spaces.
... The degree of agency or self-direction varies by individual. 26 Agency includes how one takes responsibility for one's decisions and how much one feels in control over the outcomes of decisions one faces. Agency in emerging adulthood has been found to be positively correlated with commitment and deliberate decision-making both of which are needed as college students face health choices on their own. ...
Article
Objective: Health literacy is important while attending a residential college where daily decisions can impact one’s physical and mental health and knowing who or what to trust for information is of the utmost importance in claiming more decision-making autonomy. Participants: A total of 189 students at a University in the Northeastern United States participated in this study. Methods: A cross-sectional survey assessment of shared beliefs around health behaviors was conducted. Results: Areas of high consensus center around knowledge of positive health behaviors. Consensus lessens as participants are faced with statements that require more independent thinking, more information, and more subjectivity. Gender differences are also prevalent. Conclusions: Exercising agency is needed when making a commitment to one health choice vs. another. Agency in emerging adulthood has been found to be positively correlated with commitment and deliberate decision-making both of which are needed as college students face independent health choices.
... 38 Children younger than 13 years are also impacted by poverty; however, their psychological needs differ from those of older children. 37 To ensure the homogeneity of our participants, we will only recruit those in the adolescent stage. To minimise confounders, we will exclude children with identified cognitive and/or behavioural problem(s). ...
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The aim of this research is to deal with the fluid identities of the Muslim migrants settled in America in general and in particular it explores how the conflicts between social and religious values push the protagonist Hayat Shah towards the loss of his personal and religious identity in Ayad Akhtar's novel 'American Dervish' (2012). It describes how the survival in a multicultural society particularly by the Muslim migrants becomes painful. Hayat Shah firstly holds on his remnant tenets of Islamic religion but later he is influenced by the charm of multicultural modern society of America and struggles in sustaining his Muslim identity and finding his new identity for his personal settlement with the surroundings. In this way his identity becomes fluid and keeps on changing. The research concludes that the Muslim migrant Hayat couldn't retain his Muslim identity because he finds his survival only in the adaptation of new, broader, and multicultural settings. This crisis occurs because he has been struck in the issues like religion, mystic philosophy, and cultural conflicts right in his adolescence. It is examined through textual analysis that the journey of Hayat Shah for becoming a Hafiz, and then a Sufi or Dervish comes to an end by availing a new identity of an American. The qualitative research is designed on descriptive analytic method by utilizing the approach of Identity Crisis presented by Eric Erickson.
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With the following thesis I am proposing a fictional characters-based marketing and communication management system for the entertainment industry. I will consider a wide range of studies and the results of a consumer survey to properly describe the theoretical framework and the practical uses that entertainment enterprises could make off the Character Management system. International literature and case-studies will range from consumer culture to financial uses of fictional characters, reporting two major cases for the eastern market (Tetsuwan Atomu) and the international one (Batman); on top of that, further psychosocial studies and the survey report will describe how entertainment consumers, fans and cosplayers tend to gravitate toward fictional characters they perceive as similar, forming parasocial relationships and/or identify with them, re-communicating back their personality traits as well as part of the attributes coming from the products these characters are from (e.g. comics, games, movies, and so on), and – most importantly – improving the overall characters’ related goods sales. The management system I am proposing shows off the strategies of Character Positioning, the making of a Character Portfolio and the main approaches to consider for a proper Character Promotion, explaining why these peculiar tasks should be needed, while highlighting the benefits about improving sales, overall awareness, and brand fidelity for characters’ related products. - - - - - Ed: in July 27th, 2022, this Thesis has been awarded with the Academic Mention from a special committee composed by Professors Boca S. (psychology), Fici A. (sociology), and Caracci M. (marketing).
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The present study pairs narrative meaning‐making with topic modeling to richly capture how girls choose to describe their experiences of change during puberty and to establish how these narratives map onto depressive symptoms. Participants (N = 125 girls; Mage = 11.61 years; 90.40% White) wrote about changes during puberty and reported their level of pubertal development, relationships, and mood. The relationship between meaning‐making and depressive symptoms was negatively moderated by early pubertal timing (d = .31) and positively moderated by more advanced pubertal status (d = .36). Exploratory analyses indicated that writing proportionally more about menstruation‐related changes had a small effect on subsequent depressive symptoms (f2 = .12). Results provide a conceptual and methodological update to decades‐old, landmark qualitative findings on girls' perceptions and assessments of experiences at puberty.
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Utilising the theoretical framework of Bucholtz and Hall (2005) for the analysis of identity as produced in linguistic interaction the current study focuses on the context-specific construction of various identities by second-generation German-Turk descendants. Additionally, it aims to explore the ways they negotiate those various identities by examining the various linguistic choices of interviewees. Despite the vast amount of research on this group in relation to inter alia migration, education, integration, culture clashes and culture confusions, this dissertation aims to address a rather unexplored area of linguistic research on German-Turkish individuals, more specifically, their identity negotiation in spoken interaction. Adopting a qualitative research approach, the present study draws on nine in-depth interviews, conducted with adolescents of Turkish descent born in Germany. It was of interest to explore what kinds of identities participants mobilise within an interaction with an interviewer having the same socio-cultural background, how those individuals position themselves and others, and how their bilingualism and biculturalism intersect within an interactional context. In the present study, it has been found that the most prominent identities constructed by participants were ethnic, individual and religious identities. Hereby, the highly dynamic hybridity of their identity negotiations and the compelling interplay of their Turkish and German ethnic and cultural identities have been revealed. Findings moreover show a balance between their different ethnic and cultural identities and their simultaneous configuration as German-Turkish identities. At the same time, the emphasis on interlocutors' individuality and uniqueness became prevalent and their identification with Islam was rather weak, challenging former studies' findings. Overall, the present study yielded many invaluable insights into identity constructions and future research suggestions are outlined in the conclusion.
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Parental ethnotheories shape socialization beliefs around childrearing more broadly, and children's friendships more specifically. While prior work has examined aspects of parental socialization of friendships among school‐aged children and adolescents, no studies have examined beliefs held around the function of friendships among ethnically diverse mothers of toddlers from low‐socioeconomic contexts. Toddlerhood marks a point in development when the concept of “friendship” gains impact and relevance due to leaps in children's social, cognitive, and motor skills, as well as children's increasing access to contexts where they organically encounter peers. Toddlerhood is also a time when caregivers may initially consider the influence of peers on their children, beliefs that could eventually guide and shift how they navigate socialization practices around friendship. In the present study, we document U.S. Dominican American, African American, and Mexican American mothers’ socialization beliefs around functions of friendship for their 2‐year‐old children. We found that mothers emphasized a variety of friendship functions, including learning of social skills and morality, and communicating and experiencing emotions. A majority of mothers viewed their children's friendships as unidirectional, and framed their children as undiscerning in their engagement with social information from peers. Findings are discussed in relation to mothers’ orientation to children and “childhood” via cultural and developmental beliefs.
Research
Filipino families are known to be patriarchal in nature. Mothers tend to take care of their family while the father takes on the role of being the breadwinner. However, due to economic changes, opportunities for women to work abroad increased rapidly. Hence, there was a rolereversal between the husband and the wife. The current research investigated the tendencies of left-behind fathers to over-parent their children. More so, children who adopted an external locus of control are likely susceptible to depressive symptomatology. A total of 243 undergraduate students from Batangas whose mother are working in abroad answered the survey. Results show that eldest daughters who are freshmen are susceptible to depressive symptoms. However, it was found that their fathers' over-parenting behavior did not cause their depressive symptoms and there are other factors that have influenced it.
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