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Stink Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) of Minnesota: An Annotated Checklist and New State Records

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Pentatomidae have been relatively poorly documented in Minnesota. Based on literature and museum records, an annotated checklist of the Pentatomidae of Minnesota was created. State-level and county-level records for Minnesota and the distribution of each species in North America are provided. Fifty-one species of Pentatomidae (12 Asopinae, 37 Pentatominae, and 2 Podopinae) are recorded for Minnesota. Of this total, 15 species are newly recorded for the state. Knowledge of the fauna of Pentatomidae in Minnesota will be important for providing baseline data for monitoring of potential shifts in the fauna resulting from the invasions of exotic Pentatomidae. Furthermore, a list of native Pentatomidae will be necessary for monitoring non-target impacts, if classical biological control is implemented for management of exotic Pentatomidae.
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2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 171
Stink Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) of
Minnesota: An Annotated Checklist and New State Records
Robert L. Koch1, 3, David A. Rider2, Paul P. Tinerella2, and Walter A. Rich1
Abstract
Pentatomidae have been relatively poorly documented in Minnesota.
Based on literature and museum records, an annotated checklist of the Pen-
tatomidae of Minnesota was created. State-level and county-level records for
Minnesota and the distribution of each species in North America are provided.
Fifty-one species of Pentatomidae (12 Asopinae, 37 Pentatominae, and 2 Podopi-
nae) are recorded for Minnesota. Of this total, 15 species are newly recorded
for the state. Knowledge of the fauna of Pentatomidae in Minnesota will be
important for providing baseline data for monitoring of potential shifts in the
fauna resulting from the invasions of exotic Pentatomidae. Furthermore, a list of
native Pentatomidae will be necessary for monitoring non-target impacts, if clas-
sical biological control is implemented for management of exotic Pentatomidae.
____________________
In the continental U.S. and Canada, the family Pentatomidae (i.e., stink
bugs) comprises about 222 species (Froeschner 1988). The invasions and range
expansions of several exotic Pentatomidae have brought a new level of attention
to this family in North America. Recent invaders include Halyomorpha halys
(Stål) (Hoebeke and Carter 2003), Bagrada hilaris (Burmeister) (Palumbo and
Natwick 2010), and Agonoscelis puberula Stål (Thomas et al. 2003). Further-
more, the ranges of two established exotic species, Piezodorus guildinii (West-
wood) and Picromerus bidens (Linnaeus) are expanding (Tindall and Fothergill
2011, Swanson et al. 2013).
Knowledge of the native and established fauna of Pentatomidae will be
important for providing baseline data for monitoring changes in diversity or
abundance that may occur after the invasion of exotic species. Changes to the
existing fauna could result from competitive interactions among species (Reitz
and Trumble 2002, Kenis et al. 2009). For example, in parts of Japan, non-
native Nezara viridula (L.) has replaced the native Nezara antennata Scott
(Kiritani 2011). Furthermore, a checklist of species within this family is needed
to facilitate assessment of potential non-target impacts of management tactics
implemented against invasive Pentatomidae, especially if classical biological
control is considered for management of these pests (e.g., Leskey et al. 2012,
Talamas et al. 2013).
McPherson’s (1980) call for the creation of updated species lists of Pen-
tatomoidea for states with obvious gaps, such as Minnesota and Wisconsin, has
remained largely unanswered. Despite recent attention to the pentatomoid
fauna of North America (Bundy 2012, O’Donnell and Schaefer 2012, Packauskas
2012, Rider 2012, Sites et al. 2012, Swanson 2012, Zack et al. 2012, Paiero et al.
2013), this group has been relatively poorly documented in Minnesota. Records
1Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, 1980 Folwell Avenue, Saint
Paul, MN 55108.
2Department of Entomology, North Dakota State University, NDSU Dept. 7650, P. O.
Box 6050, Fargo, ND 58108.
3Corresponding author (e-mail: koch0125@umn.edu).
172 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
for the occurrence of various species specically in Minnesota are scattered in
the literature (i.e., Walker 1867; Uhler 1871; Lugger 1900; Van Duzee 1917;
Hart 1919; Hussey 1921; Stoner 1921; Knight 1952; Barber and Sailor 1953;
McPherson 1980, 1982; Froeschner 1988; Rider and Chapin 1992; Rider 1995,
2012). However, a comprehensive, updated checklist for this family in Minnesota
is lacking. Therefore, based on museum records and literature, we present a
checklist of the Pentatomidae of Minnesota annotated with locality information.
Materials and Methods
An annotated checklist of species of Pentatomidae known to occur in Min-
nesota was generated by review of the literature and examination of holdings
in the University of Minnesota Insect Collection (UMSP), North Dakota State
University Insect Collection (NDSU), University of North Dakota Insect Collec-
tion (UND), and the personal collection of David A. Rider (DAR). The extensive
regional insect collection from the University of Minnesota Cedar Creek Ecosys-
tem Science Reserve, Anoka County, Minnesota, recently was accessioned to the
UMSP and also was examined for relevant material. State-level and county-
level records for Minnesota and the North American distributions, primarily
from McPherson (1982), are provided for each species. Minnesota counties are
shown in Fig. 1. General taxonomic keys used to identify or verify material
were McPherson (1982), Rider (2012), and Paiero et al. (2013). Nomenclature
follows Froeschner (1988), except in cases of subsequent nomenclatural changes.
Asterisks (*) following species names indicate new records for Minnesota.
Figure 1. Map of Minnesota counties.
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 173
Results and Discussion
Our review of the literature, reconciliations of recent taxonomic actions,
and examination of DAR, NDSU, UMSP, and UND specimens resulted in a nal
checklist of 51 species of Pentatomidae (12 Asopinae, 37 Pentatominae, and 2
Podopinae) for Minnesota. Fifteen of these species are newly recorded for the
state and include Apoecilus cynicus (Say), Perillus exaptus (Say), Zicrona caeru-
lea (Linnaeus), Agonoscelis puberula Stål, Banasa calva (Say), Banasa dimidi-
ata (Say), Banasa sordida (Uhler), Dendrocoris humeralis (Uhler), Euschistus
variolarius (Palisot de Beauvois), Holcostethus macdonaldi Rider and Rolston,
Mecidea major Sailer, Mecidea minor Ruckes, Neottiglossa trilineata (Kirby),
Prionosoma podopioides Uhler, and Trichopepla semivittata (Say). In comparison,
the number of species of Pentatomidae recorded for other states or provinces in
the region are 45 from North Dakota (Rider 2012), 57 from Missouri (Sites et
al. 2012), 50 from Michigan (Swanson 2012, Swanson et al. 2013), and 47 from
Ontario (Paiero et al. 2013).
Records of three species are of particular interest. Halyomorpha halys, an
Asian species rst detected in Minnesota in 2010 (Koch 2014), continues to be
found as an invader of human-made structures. Agonoscelis puberula, an African
species detected in Mexico, Jamaica, Hispaniola and the southern U.S. (Thomas
et al. 2003), is reported for the rst time in the north central U.S. A single speci-
men of A. puberula was found, and its continued presence in Minnesota needs to
be conrmed by further collecting. In addition, four male specimens of M. major
were found. Mecidea major is generally considered a southern species previously
known to occur as far north as Missouri and southern Illinois (McPherson 1982).
Further collecting is needed to conrm an established population in Minnesota.
Beyond the species presented in the checklist, some additional species may
occur in Minnesota. Euschistus politus Uhler has been reported from Minnesota
(Malloch, in Hart 1919); however, this record for Minnesota is questionable,
because Malloch stated: “‘In addition to these, there is a much darker female
specimen from Minnesota, labeled by Mr. Hart ‘politus?’”. Euschistus politus
recently has been reported for Missouri (Sites et al. 2012), Michigan (Swanson
2012), and Ontario (Paiero et al. 2013). Amaurochrous dubius (Palisot de
Beauvois) was recorded by Uhler (1876) from Minnesota; however, it has since
not been cited from the state and no new specimens have been located. The
geographic ranges of Hymenarcys nervosa (Say) and Mcphersonarcys aequalis
(Say) likely include Minnesota (McPherson 1982), but specimens or reports in
the literature specic to Minnesota were not found. Hymenarcys nervosa and M.
aequalis have both recently been reported for Kansas (Packauskas 2012), Mis-
souri (Sites et al. 2012), and Michigan (Swanson 2012). Further work is needed
to document the fauna of the other families of Pentatomoidea in Minnesota.
PENTATOMIDAE Leach, 1815
PENTATOMIDAE: ASOPINAE Spinola, 1850
Apoecilus bracteatus (Fitch, 1856)
Minnesota (Hart, 1919, as Apateticus crocatus): Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU),
Clearwater Co. (UND), Cook Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co.
(UMSP), Polk Co. (UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Stearns
Co. (DAR).
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west to Vancou-
ver, Canada, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and California” (McPherson
1982, as Apateticus bracteatus).
Apoecilus cynicus (Say, 1831) *
Minnesota: Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU), Hennepin Co. (UMSP),
Morrison Co. (DAR), Norman Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Waseca Co.
(UMSP).
174 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England south to Florida,
and west to Montana, Colorado, Texas, and Arizona” (McPherson 1982, as
Apateticus cynicus).
Perillus bioculatus (Fabricius, 1775)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co. (Knight
1952, UMSP), Dakota Co. (Knight 1952, UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin
Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (Knight 1952, UMSP), Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Mille
Lacs Co. (UMSP), Nicollet Co. (Knight 1952, UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP),
Otter Tail Co. (UMSP), Pennington Co. (Knight 1952), Ramsey Co. (Knight 1952,
UMSP), Rock Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (Knight 1952), Scott Co. (Knight
1952, UMSP), Stearns Co. (Knight 1952). Also recorded from Hastings (UMSP),
Itasca State Park (DAR, UMSP), and Princeton (UMSP), but a specic county
could not be determined as these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New York west to
the Pacic Coast, and south to Florida, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and
lower California” (McPherson 1982).
Perillus circumcinctus Stål, 1862
Minnesota (Stoner 1920, Knight 1952): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co.
(Knight 1952, UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co.
(UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (Hart 1919), Pope Co. (UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP),
Washington Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State Park (UMSP), but a
specic county could not be determined as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec west to Saskatchewan, Canada, and
south to New Jersey, Illinois, Missouri, and Nebraska” (McPherson 1982).
Perillus exaptus (Say, 1825) *
Minnesota: Cass Co. (UMSP), Cook Co. (UMSP), Crow Wing Co. (UMSP),
Lake Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Polk Co.
(UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (DAR). Also recorded from Itasca State Park and
Kawishiwi River (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as these
localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west to the
Pacic Coast, and south to New Jersey, Missouri, New Mexico, Utah, and Cali-
fornia” (McPherson 1982).
Podisus brevispinus Phillips, 1992
Minnesota (Hart 1919, as Apateticus modestus): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Becker
Co. (DAR), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Carlton Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Clay
Co. (DAR), Clearwater Co. (DAR, UMSP), Cook Co. (UMSP), Crow Wing Co.
(DAR), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Itasca
Co. (DAR, UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Lake Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (DAR),
Norman Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co.
(UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR). Also
recorded from Itasca State Park (DAR, UMSP), Kawishiwi River (UMSP) and
La Crescent (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as these
localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west to British
Columbia, Montana, and Idaho, and south to North Carolina, Georgia, and New
Mexico” (McPherson 1982, as Podisus modestus).
Podisus maculiventris (Say, 1832)
Minnesota (Walker 1867, as Arma spinosa, Lugger 1900, as Podisus spino-
sus): Big Stone Co. (UMSP), Blue Earth Co. (UMSP), Brown Co. (UMSP), Chisago
Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR), Cottonwood Co. (UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Doug-
las Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Freeborn Co. (DAR, UMSP), Goodhue Co.
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 175
(UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Jackson Co. (UMSP), Lincoln Co. (UMSP), Lyon
Co. (UMSP), Martin Co. (UMSP), McLeod Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP),
Morrison Co. (DAR, UMSP), Nobles Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Olmstead
Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Pipestone Co. (UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey
Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Rock Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (UMSP), Scott
Co. (UMSP), Sibley Co. (UMSP), Steele Co. (UMSP), Todd Co. (UMSP), Traverse
Co. (UMSP), Wabasha Co. (UMSP), Waseca Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP),
Watonwan Co. (UMSP), Wright Co. (DAR), Yellow Medicine Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west to the
Pacic Coast, and south to Florida, Arizona, and California” (McPherson 1982).
Podisus placidus Uhler, 1870
Minnesota (Hart 1919, as Apateticus placidus): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Carlton
Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Clearwater Co. (Rider 2012, UMSP), Crow Wing
Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP),
Kittson Co. (UMSP), Lyon Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co.
(UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis
Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012, UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from
Itasca State Park (DAR, UMSP) and Lake City (UMSP), but a specic county
could not be determined as these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec west to British Columbia, and
south to New Jersey, Arkansas, Colorado, Utah, and Idaho” (McPherson 1982).
Podisus serieventris Uhler, 1871
Minnesota (Uhler 1871, Hart 1919, as Apateticus serieventris): Crow Wing
Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Itasca Co. (DAR), Lake Co. (DAR, UMSP),
Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State
Park (DAR, UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as the locality
spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Nova Scotia and Quebec west to British
Columbia, and south to North Carolina, Florida, New Mexico, Utah, and Idaho”
(McPherson 1982).
Rhacognathus americanus Stål, 1870
Minnesota: Otter Tail Co. (Stoner 1921).
North America: “Reported from Massachusetts northwest to Alberta,
Canada, and southwest through Ohio to Nebraska” (McPherson 1982).
Stiretrus anchorago (Fabricius, 1775)
Minnesota (Lugger 1900): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP),
Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Nicollet Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Pine Co.
(UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Ontario and New England south to Florida,
and west to Iowa, Kansas, and Texas” (McPherson 1982).
Zicrona caerulea (Linnaeus, 1758) *
Minnesota: Saint Louis Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Hudson Bay, Maine, New Hamp-
shire, and Michigan west to British Columbia, and then south through Idaho,
Utah, and Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and California” (McPherson 1982).
PENTATOMIDAE: PENTATOMINAE Leach, 1815
Aelia americana Dallas, 1851
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Isanti Co.
(UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012, UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Red Lake Co.
(UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Wright Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca
176 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
State Park (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as the locality
spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “British Columbia south to Arizona, east
to Manitoba, Michigan, and Illinois” (McPherson 1982).
Agonoscelis puberula Stål, 1854 *
Minnesota: Anoka/Isanti Co. (UMSP). A single specimen was collected
from an old eld on 16 July 1996 at the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve,
University of Minnesota.
North America: Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Mexico and United States
(Arizona, New Mexico and Texas) (Thomas et al. 2003).
Banasa calva (Say, 1832) *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Houston Co.
(UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New England south
to North Carolina and Georgia, and west to British Columbia, Oregon, Colorado,
and lower California” (McPherson 1982).
Banasa dimidiata (Say, 1832) *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Becker Co. (DAR, NDSU), Beltrami Co.
(UND), Carlton Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU), Cook Co. (UMSP), Goodhue
Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (DAR, UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co.
(UMSP), Itasca Co. (DAR), Lake Co. (UMSP), Meeker Co. (UMSP), Morrison
Co. (DAR), Norman Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Ramsey Co. (DAR, UMSP), Red Lake
Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (UMSP),
Washington Co. (UMSP), Wright Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State
Park and Lake City (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as
these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported fromQuebec and New England west to the Pacic
Coast, and south to Florida, Oklahoma, Texas, and California” (McPherson 1982).
Banasa sordida (Uhler, 1871) *
Minnesota: Dakota Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Ontario and New England west to Van-
couver Island, and south to Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, New Mexico,
and California” (McPherson 1982).
Brochymena quadripustulata (Fabricius, 1775)
Minnesota (Lugger 1900, as Brochymena annulata): Anoka Co. (UMSP),
Brown Co. (UMSP), Carver Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co. (UMSP),
Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012, UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co.
(UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Kandiyohi Co. (UMSP),
Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail
Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Red Lake Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP),
Stearns Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012), Wabasha Co. (UMSP), Washington Co.
(UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State Park (UMSP) and Lake City (UMSP),
but a specic county could not be determined as these localities span multiple
counties.
North America: Reported from “southern Canada and the continental
United States, from the Atlantic to Pacic coasts, and ranges south into northern
Mexico, but is most common north of 40˚ N” (McPherson 1982).
Chinavia hilaris (Say, 1832)
Minnesota (Lugger, 1900, as Nezara pennsylvanica): Anoka Co. (UMSP),
Becker Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012), Beltrami Co. (NDSU), Big Stone Co.
(NDSU, Rider 2012), Cass Co. (NDSU), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012),
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 177
Clearwater Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co.
(UMSP), Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Lyon Co. (UMSP), Martin Co. (UMSP), Norman
Co. (NDSU), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (Rider 2012, UND), Pipestone
Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (NDSU, Rider
2012), Stearns Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012), Traverse Co. (UMSP), Waseca
Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west through
southern Canada and the northern states to the Pacic Coast, and south and
southwest to Florida, Texas, Arizona, Utah, and California” (McPherson 1982,
as Acrosternum hilare).
Chinavia pensylvanica (Gmelin, 1790)
Minnesota: Houston Co. (UMSP). Lugger (1900) included this species for
Minnesota, but was based on a misidentication (Rider 2012).
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west to Iowa
and Minnesota, and south to Georgia, Florida, Missouri, and possibly Kansas”
(McPherson 1982, as Acrosternum pennsylvanicum).
Chlorochroa belfragii (Stål, 1872)
Minnesota: Clay Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Kandiyohi Co. (UMSP), Pine
Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Virginia, and
Canada” (McPherson 1982, as Rhytidolomia belfragii).
Chlorochroa persimilis Horvath, 1908
Minnesota (Lugger 1900, as Lioderma ligata): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Beltrami
Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Nor-
man Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Ramsey
Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Wabasha Co. (UMSP),
Washington Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State Park (UMSP), but a
specic county could not be determined as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England south to Florida,
and west to at least the Mississippi River, and probably to Iowa and Kansas”
(McPherson 1982).
Coenus delius (Say, 1832)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Big Stone Co. (UMSP), Carlton Co.
(UMSP), Chippewa Co. (DAR), Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU),
Crow Wing Co. (UMSP), Douglas Co. (UMSP), Freeborn Co. (Rider 1995), Hen-
nepin Co. (Rider 1995, UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Kan-
diyohi Co. (UMSP), Lac qui Parle Co. (DAR), Lincoln Co. (UMSP), Mahnomen
Co. (UMSP), Marshall Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Olmsted Co.
(UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU, UMSP, UND), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP),
Renville Co. (UMSP), Rock Co. (UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP),
Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR), Traverse Co. (UMSP), Wadena
Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Wilkin Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (Rider
1995), Wright Co. (DAR). Also recorded from Itasca State Park (UMSP), but a
specic county could not be determined as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England south to North
Carolina, and west to British Columbia, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Oklahoma, and
Texas” (McPherson 1982).
Cosmopepla lintneriana Kirkaldy, 1909
Minnesota (Lugger 1900, as Cosmopepla carnifex): Aitkin Co. (UMSP),
Anoka Co. (UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Big Stone Co. (UMSP), Brown Co. (DAR),
Cass Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU), Clearwater Co.
(UMSP, UND), Cook Co. (UMSP), Crow Wing Co. (UMSP), Dodge Co. (UMSP),
178 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
Douglas Co. (UMSP), Faribault Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Freeborn
Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (DAR, UMSP), Houston Co.
(UMSP), Hubbard Co. (NDSU), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Itasca Co. (UMSP), Ka-
nabec Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP), Lac qui Parle Co. (UMSP), Lake Co.
(NDSU, UMSP), Lake of the Woods Co. (UMSP), Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Lyon
Co. (UMSP), McLeod Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (UMSP),
Nicollet Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail Co.
(UMSP), Pennington Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (UMSP), Ramsey
Co. (UMSP), Renville Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Saint
Louis Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR,
UMSP), Steele Co. (UMSP), Todd Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Traverse Co. (UMSP),
Wabasha Co. (UMSP), Wadena Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Wilkin
Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (UMSP), Wright Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from
Itasca State Park (NDSU, UMSP), Lake City (UMSP), Saint Cloud (UMSP),
and Sullivan Lake (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as
these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Nova Scotia and New England west to
British Columbia and Washington, and south to Georgia, Texas, and Mexico”
(McPherson 1982, as Cosmopepla bimaculata).
Dendrocoris humeralis (Uhler, 1877) *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “New England south to Georgia, and west
through Colorado and New Mexico to California” (McPherson 1982).
Euschistus ictericus (Linnaeus, 1763)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Carlton Co. (UMSP), Carver Co. (UMSP),
Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012), Dakota Co. (DAR,
Rider 2012, UMSP), Dodge Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co.
(UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP),
Koochiching Co. (UMSP), Lake Co. (UMSP), Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Norman
Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP),
Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co.
(DAR, UMSP, UND), Wadena Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “northern United States and Canada from
coast to coast, and also ranges southward to Florida, Oklahoma, and Texas”
(McPherson 1982).
Euschistus latimarginatus Zimmer, 1910
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU,
Rider 2012).
North America: This is a Great Plains species (Rider 2012) ranging spo-
radically from Texas to North Dakota.
Euschistus servus euschistoides (Vollenhoven, 1868)
Minnesota (Lugger 1900, as Euschistus variolarius): Anoka Co. (UMSP),
Becker Co. (DAR, UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co.
(UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU), Clearwater Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Crow Wing Co.
(UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Dodge Co. (UMSP), Douglas Co. (UMSP), Fillmore
Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (DAR, UMSP), Houston Co.
(UMSP), Hubbard Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Itasca Co. (DAR), Kanabec
Co. (UMSP), Kandiyohi Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Mahnomen
Co. (UMSP), Marshall Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Nicollet Co. (UMSP), Norman Co.
(DAR, NDSU, UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (UMSP), Penning-
ton Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU, UMSP, UND), Ramsey Co.
(UMSP), Renville Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Saint
Louis Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (UMSP, UND),
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 179
Steele Co. (UMSP), Todd Co. (UMSP), Wabasha Co. (DAR, UMSP), Wadena
Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from
Itasca State Park (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as the
locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported “across the northern United States and southern
Canada” (McPherson 1982).
Euschistus tristigmus luridus Dallas, 1851
Minnesota: Aitkin Co. (UMSP), Anoka Co. (UMSP), Becker Co. (DAR,
NDSU, UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Carlton Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP),
Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU), Clearwater Co. (DAR, UMSP),
Cook Co. (UMSP), Crow Wing Co. (UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Douglas Co.
(UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP),
Houston Co. (UMSP), Hubbard Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Itasca Co. (DAR,
UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP), Koochiching Co. (NDSU),
Lac qui Parle Co. (UMSP), Lake Co. (UMSP), Lake of the Woods Co. (UMSP),
Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Lyon Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co.
(UMSP), Nicollet Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co. (UMSP),
Otter Tail Co. (NDSU), Pine Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP),
Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Red Lake Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP), Roseau Co.
(UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (Malloch, in Hart 1919, NDSU, UMSP), Stearns Co.
(DAR, UMSP), Todd Co. (UMSP), Traverse Co. (UMSP), Wabasha Co. (UMSP),
Wadena Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (UMSP). Also re-
corded from Princeton (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined
as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported “north of latitude 41˚ N from Nova Scotia, Que-
bec, and New England west to Washington” (McPherson 1982).
Euschistus variolarius (Palisot de Beauvois, 1817) *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Benton Co. (UMSP), Big Stone Co. (NDSU,
UMSP), Blue Earth Co. (UMSP), Brown Co. (DAR), Carver Co. (UMSP), Chip-
pewa Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU), Cottonwood
Co. (UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Dodge Co. (UMSP), Douglas Co. (UMSP),
Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Faribault Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Freeborn
Co. (UMSP), Grant Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP),
Isanti Co. (UMSP), Jackson Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Kandiyohi Co.
(UMSP), Lac qui Parle Co. (UMSP), Le Sueur Co. (UMSP), Lincoln Co. (UMSP),
Lyon Co. (UMSP), Mahnomen Co. (NDSU), Martin Co. (UMSP), McLeod Co.
(UMSP), Meeker Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (UMSP), Mower Co. (UMSP), Mur-
ray Co. (UMSP), Nicollet Co. (DAR, UMSP), Nobles Co. (UMSP), Olmstead Co.
(UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (NDSU), Pine Co. (UMSP), Pipestone Co. (UMSP, UND),
Polk Co. (UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Rice Co. (UMSP),
Rock Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP), Sherburne Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR,
UMSP), Steele Co. (UMSP), Stevens Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Swift Co. (UMSP), Todd
Co. (UMSP), Traverse Co. (UMSP), Wabasha Co. (UMSP), Wadena Co. (UMSP),
Waseca Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Wilkin Co. (UMSP), Winona
Co. (UMSP), Wright Co. (UMSP), Yellow Medicine Co. (UMSP). Also recorded
from Kawishiwi River and Lake City (UMSP), but a specic county could not be
determined as these localities span multiple counties. Lugger (1900) includes
this species for Minnesota, but was based on a misidentication (Rider 2012).
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New England south
to Florida, and west to British Columbia, Idaho, and Utah” (McPherson 1982).
Halyomorpha halys (Stål), 1855
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (Koch 2014, UMSP), Carver Co. (Koch 2014),
Chisago Co. (Koch 2014), Dakota Co. (Koch 2014), Hennepin Co. (Koch 2014),
Ramsey Co. (Koch 2014, UMSP), Saint Louis County (M. Abrahamson, pers.
180 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
comm.), Washington Co. (Koch 2014, UMSP), Winona Co. (Koch 2014, UMSP).
Rider (2012) reported this species being found in shipping containers in Clay Co.
North America: The known range of this species is rapidly expanding. It
has been recorded from at least 38 states and the District of Columbia in the
U.S. and from parts of Canada (Leskey et al. 2012).
Holcostethus abbreviatus Uhler, 1872
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Big Stone Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU,
Rider 2012), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP),
Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co.
(UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Hastings (UMSP), but a specic
county could not be determined as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Iowa northwest to British Colombia and
Washington, west to Oregon and California, and southwest to New Mexico and
lower California” (McPherson 1982).
Holcostethus limbolarius (Stål, 1872)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Benton Co. (UMSP), Blue Earth Co. (DAR),
Brown Co. (DAR), Cass Co. (UMSP), Chippewa Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU,
Rider 2012, UMSP), Cottonwood Co. (UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Freeborn
Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Grant Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP),
Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Kandiyohi Co.
(UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP), Lac qui Parle Co. (UMSP), Lake Co. (UMSP), Le
Sueur Co. (UMSP), Lincoln Co. (UMSP), Lyon Co. (UMSP), Marshall Co. (NDSU,
Rider 2012, UMSP), Norman Co. (UMSP), Otter Tail Co. (UMSP), Polk Co.
(DAR, UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Rock Co. (UMSP), Saint
Louis Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR), Steele Co. (UMSP),
Todd Co. (UMSP), Traverse Co. (UMSP), Wadena Co. (UMSP), Washington Co.
(UMSP), Yellow Medicine Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State Park
and Royalton (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined as these
localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New England west
across the continent, and south and west to Georgia, Texas, “Old Mexico,” New
Mexico, and California” (McPherson 1982).
Holcostethus macdonaldi Rider and Rolston, 1995 *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP),
Lake Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP). Also recorded
from Itasca State Park (UMSP), but a specic county could not be determined
as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec west to Alberta, Canada, and south
to Illinois and Colorado” (McPherson 1982, as Holcostethus piceus).
Mecidea major Sailer 1952 *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Anoka/Isanti Co.
(UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Arizona and Texas north to Kansas, Mis-
souri and southern Illinois” (McPherson 1982).
Mecidea minor Ruckes 1946 *
Minnesota: Nicollet Co. (DAR), Rock Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “northern third of Mexico north to central
California, northern Utah, and central South Dakota, with the eastern boundary
near the eastern borders of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas” (McPherson 1982).
Rider (2012) collected this species from Cass County, North Dakota, which is
on the border with Minnesota.
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 181
Menecles insertus (Say, 1832)
Minnesota: Becker Co. (DAR, Rider 2012), Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clay
Co. (DAR, Rider 2012, UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP),
Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New England west
to Nebraska and Kansas, southwest to Arizona and California, and south to
Arkansas and Florida” (McPherson 1982).
Mormidea lugens (Fabricius, 1775)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP),
Chisago Co. (UMSP), Clearwater Co. (Rider 2012, UMSP), Crow Wing Co.
(UMSP), Fillmore Co. (DAR, Rider 2012), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co.
(UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Hubbard Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Isanti Co.
(UMSP), Lake Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (DAR, Rider 2012), Norman Co. (NDSU,
Rider 2012), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Polk Co. (NDSU, Rider
2012), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis (UMSP), Stearns Co. (UMSP), Todd
Co. (UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP), Winona Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from
Itasca State Park (DAR, UMSP) and Minneiska (UMSP), but a specic county
could not be determined as these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Ontario, Quebec, and Maine south to
Florida, and west to North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Oklahoma,
and Texas, and into Mexico” (McPherson 1982).
Murgantia histrionica (Hahn, 1834)
Minnesota: Dakota Co. (UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Murray Co. (Hodson
and Cook 1960, UMSP), Polk Co. (UMSP). Hodson and Cook (1960) treat their
records of Murgantia histrionica in Minnesota as a one-time, long-range aerial
transport into the state.
North America: Reported from “New England west to Colorado, and south
and southwest to Florida, Texas, and California; it has occasionally been reported
from as far north as Iowa, South Dakota, and Minnesota” (McPherson 1982).
Neottiglossa sulcifrons Stål, 1872
Minnesota: Clay Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Houston Co. (UMSP), Pope Co.
(UMSP), Rock Co. (UMSP), Yellow Medicine Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “New Jersey south to Georgia, and west
to Nebraska, Kansas, and New Mexico; also known from South Dakota, Utah,
British Columbia, and lower California” (McPherson 1982).
Neottiglossa trilineata (Kirby, 1837) *
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP).
North America: Ranges from “Quebec, Nova Scotia, northern Michigan,
and Nebraska west to British Columbia and California” (McPherson 1982).
Neottiglossa undata (Say, 1832)
Minnesota (Van Duzee 1917): Anoka Co. (UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UND),
Blue Earth Co. (UMSP), Cass Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (DAR, NDSU, UMSP),
Clearwater Co. (Rider 1989, UMSP), Cook Co. (UMSP), Crow Wing Co. (UMSP),
Douglas Co. (UMSP), Fillmore Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co.
(UMSP), Houston Co. (UMSP), Isanti Co. (UMSP), Itasca Co. (Rider 1989, DAR),
Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Kittson Co. (UMSP), Lac qui Parle Co. (UMSP), Lake Co.
(UMSP), Marshall Co. (UMSP), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (UMSP),
Norman Co. (NDSU), Olmstead Co. (UMSP), Pine Co. (UMSP), Pipestone Co.
(UMSP), Polk Co. (Rider 1989, NDSU, UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co.
(UMSP), Roseau Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (NDSU, UMSP), Traverse Co.
(UMSP), Washington Co. (UMSP). Also recorded from Itasca State Park (DAR,
182 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST Vol. 47, Nos. 3 - 4
UMSP), Kawishiwi River (UMSP), and Roosevelt (UMSP), but a specic county
could not be determined as these localities span multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England west across
southern Canada and the northern United States to the Pacic coast, and gen-
erally occurs no farther south than New Jersey” (McPherson 1982).
Oebalus pugnax pugnax (Fabricius, 1775)
Minnesota (Lugger 1900): Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported “throughout the continental United States east
of the Rocky Mountains as far north as New York, southern Minnesota, and
southern Michigan” (McPherson 1982).
Parabrochymena arborea (Say, 1825)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Becker Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Chisago
Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Morrison Co. (DAR, NDSU, Rider 2012),
Otter Tail Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Stearns Co. (DAR,
NDSU, Rider 2012). Also recorded from Baker Hills (UMSP), but a specic county
could not be determined as the locality spans multiple counties.
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Ontario, and New England south
to Florida, and west to Kansas, New Mexico, Mexico, North Dakota, South Da-
kota, and Iowa” (McPherson 1982, as Brochymena arborea, Rider 2012).
Prionosoma podopioides Uhler, 1863 *
Minnesota: Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Scott Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “British Columbia south to lower California,
and east to Michigan and Illinois” (McPherson 1982).
Sciocoris microphthalmus Flor, 1860
Minnesota: Carlton Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU), Hennepin Co. (Hussey
1921), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (Hart 1919), Traverse Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec west to Alberta, Canada, and south
to Massachusetts, Iowa, North Dakota, and possibly Oklahoma” (McPherson 1982).
Thyanta custator accerra McAtee, 1919
Minnesota: Becker Co. (UMSP), Beltrami Co. (UMSP), Clay Co. (NDSU),
Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Grant Co. (Rider and Chapin 1992), Isanti Co. (UMSP),
Nobles Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (Rider and Chapin
1992).
North America: Reported from “New York south to Georgia, and west to
Idaho, northeastern Utah, northeastern New Mexico, and Texas; it also ranges
into south-central Canada” (McPherson 1982, as Thyanta accerra).
Trichopepla atricornis Stål, 1872
Minnesota: Blue Earth Co. (DAR), Brown Co. (DAR), Clay Co. (DAR,
NDSU, Rider 2012), Redwood Co. (DAR), Traverse Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Ohio, Illinois, and Wisconsin west to
Alaska, British Columbia, and California” (McPherson 1982).
Trichopepla semivittata (Say, 1832) *
Minnesota: Wright Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Southern Canada, the continental United
States, and northern Mexico” (McPherson 1982).
PENTATOMIDAE: PODOPINAE Amyot and Serville, 1843
Amaurochrous brevitylus Barber and Sailer, 1953
Minnesota: Blue Earth Co. (DAR), Clay Co. (NDSU, Rider 2012), Houston
2014 THE GREAT LAKES ENTOMOLOGIST 183
Co. (UMSP). Hubbard Co. (Barber and Sailer 1953), Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP),
Nicollet Co. (DAR).
North America: Reported from “Quebec, Canada, Massachusetts, New
York, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Arizona,
Michigan, and Illinois” (McPherson 1982).
Amaurochrous cinctipes (Say, 1828)
Minnesota: Anoka Co. (UMSP), Becker Co. (UMSP), Chisago Co. (UMSP),
Crow Wing Co. (UMSP), Dakota Co. (UMSP), Goodhue Co. (UMSP), Houston
Co. (UMSP), Hennepin Co. (UMSP), Kanabec Co. (UMSP), Pope Co. (UMSP),
Mille Lacs Co. (UMSP), Ramsey Co. (UMSP), Saint Louis Co. (Hart 1919),
Sherburne Co. (UMSP).
North America: Reported from “Quebec and New England south to the
Carolinas, and west and southwest to Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri,
Louisiana, and Texas” (McPherson 1982).
Acknowledgments
We thank Jay McPherson, Daniel Swanson, Susan Weller, and Rob Venette
for providing reviews of this manuscript, Ralph Holzenthal for insightful discus-
sion, and Anthony Hanson for creating the map. Digitization, computerization,
and virtual discovery of University of Minnesota pentatomoid specimens were
supported within the larger UMSP effort for collections digitization, by a grant
from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF EF-1114845; P. P. Tinerella)
for Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections. Funding for R. L. K. and W.
A. R. was provided by the Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council.
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The Pentatomoidea fauna for North Dakota is documented. There are 62 species of Pentatomoidea known from North Dakota: Acanthosomatidae (2), Cydnidae (4), Pentatomidae: Asopinae (9), Pentatomidae: Pentatominae (34), Pentatomidae: Podopinae (2), Scutelleridae (6), and Thyreocoridae (5). Of this total, 36 represent new state records for North Dakota. Additionally, 16 new state records are reported for Minnesota, and one new state record each for South Dakota, Texas, and Utah. The new state records for North Dakota are: Acanthosomatidae: Elasmostethus cruciatus (Say), Elasmucha lateralis (Say); Cydnidae: Amnestus pusillus Uhler, Amnestus spinifrons (Say), Microporus obliquus Uhler; Pentatomidae (Asopinae): Perillus exaptus (Say), Podisus brevispinus Phillips, Podisus maculiventris (Say), Podisus placidus Uhler, Podisus serieventris Uhler; Pentatomidae (Pentatominae): Aelia americana Dallas, Neottiglossa sulcifrons Stål, Euschistus ictericus (Linnaeus), Euschistus latimarginatus Zimmer, Euschistus variolarius (Palisot de Beauvois), Holcostethus macdonaldi Rider and Rolston, Menecles insertus (Say), Mormidea lugens (Fabricius), Trichopepla atricornis Stål, Parabrochymena arborea (Say), Mecidea minor Ruckes, Chinavia hilaris (Say), Chlorochroa belfragii (Stål), Chlorochroa ligata (Say), Chlorochroa viridicata (Walker), Tepa brevis (Van Duzee), Banasa euchlora Stål, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn); Pentatomidae (Podopinae): Amaurochrous brevitylus Barber and Sailer, Amaurochrous cinctipes (Say); Scutelleridae: Phimodera binotata (Say), Vanduzeeina borealis Van Duzee, Acantholomidea denticulata (Stål), Homaemus bijugis Uhler; and Thyreocoridae: Corimelaena lateralis (Fabricius), Galgupha ovalis Hussey. New state records for Minnesota are: Acanthosomatidae: E. cruciatus; Cydnidae: Amnestus pallidus Zimmer, A. pusillus, M. obliquus; Pentatomidae (Asopinae): P. placidus; Pentatomidae (Pentatominae): A. americana, N. sulcifrons, E. ictericus, E. latimarginatus, Holcostethus abbreviatus Uhler, Holcostethus limbolarius (Stål), M. insertus, M. lugens, T. atricornis, C. belfragii; and Scutelleridae: V. borealis. B. euchlora is recorded from South Dakota for the first time, and E. latimarginatus is reported from Texas and Utah for the first time. Keys are provided for the identification of all included taxa.
Article
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The Asian pentatomid Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Heteroptera) is reported for the first time in North America based on collection of specimens or confirmed sightings in five counties in eastern Pennsylvania. Known in the Asian literature as the yellow-brown or brown marmorated stink bug, H. halys is considered a significant horticultural pest in Japan; it has a broad host range that includes plants of economic importance such as pea, soybean, apple, peach, cherry, and various other fruit and ornamental trees. In Japan's northern regions it is regarded as a nuisance pest late in the season when adults aggregate and seek overwintering sites in and around houses and commercial establishments. Descriptions and photographs of the adult and immature stages are provided to help distinguish it from other North American pentatomids. Habits, seasonal history, and host plants, based on the Asian literature and our own observations, are summarized. Photographs of leaf-feeding damage are also provided. Halyomorpha halys may have been accidentally introduced with international commerce, i.e., via bulk freight containers from either Japan, Korea, or China.
Article
Froeschner (1988) recorded 23 species of stink bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) from Washington State. Based on material primarily housed in the M. T. James Entomological Collection at Washington State University, the number of species is increased to 51. Three species recorded by Froeschner (1988) were not found in our collections: Apateticus crocatus (Uhler), Chlorochroa rossiana Buxton and Thomas, and Tepa rugulosa (Say). Species recorded from Washington State for the first time are: Apoecilus bracteatus (Fitch), Perillus bioculatus (Fabricius), Podisus maculiventris (Say), P. pallens (Stål), P. placidus Uhler, P. serieventris Uhler, Zicrona caerulea (Linnaeus), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), Brochymena quadripustulata (Fabricius), B. sulcata Van Duzee, Acrosternum hilare (Say), Aelia americana Dallas, Banasa euchlora Stål, B. tumidifrons Thomas and Yonke, Chlorochroa congrua Uhler, Coenus delius (Say), Cosmopepla uhleri Montandon, Dendrocoris pini Montandon, Euschistus servus (Say), E. tristigmus (Say), E. variolarius (Palisot), Holcostethus limbolarius (Say), Neottiglossa sulcifrons Stål, N. undata (Say), Prionosoma podopioides (Uhler), Tepa yerma (Rolston), Trichopepla grossa (Van Duzee), and Amaurochrous vanduzeei Barber and Sailer.
Article
We provide town data for the Pentatomidae in Connecticut. Although this state has been much collected, most sampling has been limited to only a few locations. Species newly recorded for Connecticut are: Halyomorpha halys (Stål), Hymenarcys nervosa (Say), Banasa euchlora Stål, B. sordida (Uhler), and Perillus bioculatus (Fabricius). Podisus neglectus (Westwood) may occur in the state. Other species found in neighboring states may eventually be found in Connecticut: Picromerus bidens (Linnaeus), Rhacognathus americanus Stål, Mcphersonarcys aequalis (Say), Thyanta custator custator (Fabricius), T. custator acerra McAtee, and Amaurochrous brevitylus (Barber and Sailer). We briefly analyze these data, recognizing some faunal elements. More collecting needs to be conducted in the state, so that distribution patterns outlined here can be more broadly understood, and so that species of potential conservation concern can be identified.
Article
A list of the Pentatomidae of New Mexico with county records and collection dates is given. A total of 87 species of stink bugs is reported for New Mexico with 19 new state records.