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First attempt to study chick-peas utilisation in growing rabbit feeding.

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Abstract

Two lines of chick-peas (Cicer arietinum), selected for animal nutrition, have been introduced at 0% - 10 % or 20 % in complete pelleted diets for growing rabbits. The 5 diets were distributed ad libitum for 6 weeks to 30 day old rabbits, caged individually (20 per group). The average growth daily gain was high - 39.0 g/day - without differences between diets. The only difference was a greater amount of digestible energy needed for 1 g of weight gain with 20 % of the second line of chick-pea (26.2%proteins) : 7.86 kcal ED/g versus 7.17 to 7.49 for the 4 other experimental diets, including the 2 diets with the first chick-pea line (22.5% proteins). Digestibility study of the 5 diets indicates a high digestible energy concentration for chick-pea 3100-3200 kcal/kg as fed and a moderate to high digestibility of proteins : 70 to 82%. No special problems of mortality have been observed : 3 died rabbits out of 100.
... It is known that the proteins of legumes are higher in essential amino acids especially lysine and arginine which are more digestible than those of cereals but, are deficient in sulphur-containing amino acids being methionine and cystine (Fraga, 1998, Iqbal et al. 2006and Lebas, 2013). Due to their low level of fibre, chickpeas have a digestible energy that T exceeds rabbit energy requirements, making them a suitable source of energy for rabbit feeding (Lebas, 1988 andNizza et al. 1993). However, the value of these seeds when they are used unprocessed, is limited by the presence of various anti-nutritive factors such as trypsin inhibitors, saponins, lectins or tannins, These metabolites, in some concentrations reduced nutrient digestibility (Fraga, 1998 andJezierny et al. 2010). ...
... In this connection, Lebas (1988) found that the inclusion of chickpeas up to 20% replacing partially soybean meal had no negative effects on growth rates. Alicata et al. (1991) found that the inclusion rates of 10 and 20% chickpeas are more common in rabbit diets. ...
... This improvement in growth performance with 25, 50 or 75% CSB could be attributed to both high nutritive value (Bampidis and Christodoulou, 2011). Moreover, chickpeas have a high digestible energy making them a suitable source of energy for rabbit feeding (Lebas, 1988;Nizza et al. 1993). Besides, chickpea seeds can be used safely as a protein source for growing and breeding rabbits (Alicata et al. 1992;Roy et al. 2002). ...
... It is known that the proteins of legumes are richer in essential amino acids especially lysine and arginine and more digestible than those of cereals but most deficient in sulphur-containing amino acids methionine and cystine (Lebas, 2013). chickpeas have a digestible energy that exceeds rabbit energy requirements, making them a suitable source of energy for rabbit feeding (Lebas, 1988 andNizza et al., 1993). However, the value of these seeds is limited by the presence of various anti-nutritive factors such as trypsin inhibitors, saponins, lectins or tannins. ...
... Also, the FCR values were better (P<0.05) with rabbit groups fed CSB diets at different tested levels in comparison with the control group. In this connection, Lebas, (1988) found that the inclusion of chickpeas up to 20% replacing partially soybean meal had no negative effects on growth rates. Alicata et al., (1991) found that the inclusion rates of 10 and 20% chickpeas are more common in rabbit diets. ...
... values of DCP, TDN and DE in comparison with other experimental groups. Lebas, (1988) stated that the inclusion of chickpea at 10 or 20% in growing rabbit diets resulted in a high digestible energy concentration for chickpea 3100-3200 kcal DE/kg and a moderate to high digestibility of protein 70 to 80%. ...
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