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Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms

Authors:
  • STERIS Corp., Mentor, Ohio, United States
  • Vancive Medical Technologies, an Avery Dennison Business

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OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens. SETTING Two acute-care hospitals. METHODS We examined the effectiveness of PX-UV for killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) on glass carriers and evaluated the impact of pathogen concentration, distance from the device, organic load, and shading from the direct field of radiation on killing efficacy. We compared the effectiveness of PX-UV and ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation, each delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet. In hospital rooms, the frequency of native pathogen contamination on high-touch surfaces was assessed before and after 10 minutes of PX-UV irradiation. RESULTS On carriers, irradiation delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet from the PX-UV device reduced recovery of C. difficile spores, MRSA, and VRE by 0.55±0.34, 1.85±0.49, and 0.6±0.25 log 10 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm ² , respectively. Increasing distance from the PX-UV device dramatically reduced killing efficacy, whereas pathogen concentration, organic load, and shading did not. Continuous UV-C achieved significantly greater log 10 CFU reductions than PX-UV irradiation on glass carriers. On frequently touched surfaces, PX-UV significantly reduced the frequency of positive C. difficile , VRE, and MRSA culture results. CONCLUSIONS The PX-UV device reduced recovery of MRSA, C. difficile , and VRE on glass carriers and on frequently touched surfaces in hospital rooms with a 10-minute UV exposure time. PX-UV was not more effective than continuous UV-C in reducing pathogen recovery on glass slides, suggesting that both forms of UV have some effectiveness at relatively short exposure times. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–6
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... They emit a broad spectrum of UV light (100-280 nm) as well as visible light (400-700 nm). These devices often involve repositioning of the device in multiple areas of the room [126]. This adds time as well as manual input into the disinfection process. ...
... This wavelength of light is highly absorbed by nucleic acids and therefore is accountable for the mechanism of kill [127]. Nerandzic and colleagues compared the efficacy of a pulsed xenon UV device and continuous wave UVC [126]. They concluded that following a 10 min exposure period continuous UVC decreased the recovery of C. difficile and MRSA two times greater, and VRE six times greater than pulsed xenon UV-disinfection. ...
... 2021, 1, FOR PEER REVIEW 13 wavelength of light is highly absorbed by nucleic acids and therefore is accountable for the mechanism of kill [127]. Nerandzic and colleagues compared the efficacy of a pulsed xenon UV device and continuous wave UVC [126]. They concluded that following a 10 min exposure period continuous UVC decreased the recovery of C. difficile and MRSA two times greater, and VRE six times greater than pulsed xenon UV-disinfection. ...
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