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Money and sustainability : the missing link ; a report from the Club of Rome - EU Chapter to Finance Watch and the World Business Academy

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In 1972, the famous first Report for the Club of Rome - 'The Limits to Growth' - showed how an economic system that demands infinite growth in a finite world is fundamentally unsustainable. This new Report explains our present monopolistic money system and the flawed thinking that underpins it. Our money system is the 'Missing Link'. We assume that we must have a single, monopolistic currency, funded through bank debt, enforced by a central bank. In fact, the present system is outdated, brittle and unfit for purpose (witness the eurozone crisis). It's profitable at first but ultimately a recipe for economic environmental disasaster.
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... 3) Eine Währung für Gesundheit erhöht Liquidität im Gesundheitssektor: In diesem Szenario könnte man beim Kauf/Konsum gesunder Produkte Gesundheitsmarken erhalten, die variabel für weitere Käufe eingesetzt werden können. Die dadurch entstehende Kaufkraft würde die Liquidität im "gesunden" Gesundheitssektor um bis zu 30 % erhöhen (35). 4) Steuerbefreiung von Geschäftsmodellen für Prävention: Die Prävention hat immer noch ein Nischendasein und wird als teuer wahrgenommen. ...
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