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The Effects of Carrot Juice on Blood Glucose Levels

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Carrot juice is an integral part of the Hallelujah diet. The effect of carrot juice on blood sugar was tested. Through this study we measured the glycemic index of carrot juice to be 86, on a scale where the glycemic index of bread is 100. The glycemic response of carrot juice was lowered to 66 by consuming oil along with the juice. Chromium was also found to be beneficial to 4 of 6 people who participated in a 1-week supplement test. Carrot juice causes fewer problems to individuals struggling to lower their blood sugar than animal fats, bread, and flour products.
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