GIS-Based System to Better Guide Water Resources Management and Decision Making

Conference Paper · May 2014with 32 Reads
DOI: 10.1061/9780784413548.194
Conference: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2014
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Abstract
A new method of participatory decision support that can be used in transboundary basins is presented. The framework of this method relies first on the creation of a transboundary geographic information system database to store hydrologic data and allow easy access to data by stakeholders. Results show that the countries of the Jordan River could benefit from the framework, and in the case of southern Lebanon six climate stations should be replaced or reactivated. Finally, the mechanism of a Lebanese hydrologic information system is presented and shows that an observation data model will facilitate science and policy integration.

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