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Postembryonic development of anurans in ponds contaminated with metal-containing constructions (imitation experiments)

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Abstract

The effect of simulated pollution of ponds with lead- and iron-containing alloys on the morphogenesis of tadpoles of anuran species (common frog (Rana temporaria), moor frog (Rana arvalis), and common toad (Bufo bufo)) was studied. The observations showed that a flow of metal particles into the body tadpole during feeding affected the dimensional characteristics of the tadpoles. The simulated iron contamination increased the overall size of the tadpoles, as compared to that in the control ones. Under the simulated lead contamination, growth processes were inhibited resulting in the development of significantly smaller tadpoles than those in the control group. The pollution by metal-containing alloys had no effect on the proportion of the development.

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