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Poems of Black Africa

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... According to Aboh (2012: 2): " Nigerian socio-political development has presented highly political subject matter for these poets, and maintaining the tradition of their predecessors in terms of voicing their incenses with government's lack of focus but with a difference in stylistic presentation, this generation of poets engages their poems as avenues to register their contempt with a system that makes them slaves in their own country. " Ojaide (1989), Ofeimum (Soyinka 1975), Aiyejina (Solanke 2005) and Solanke (2008) -are regarded and treated, in this paper, as a group of one generation. Nigeria's independence is still under a century as she is just going towards its diamond age. ...
... The poetry of these versatile but combative poets is not only historical, personal and national, it is such that entreats the people to stand, fight and acquire the type of nation they dream about. This paper examines the following six poets and their poems listed against their names: Obafemi (2001), ( " Haba Habib " , " Maradona " ), Dasylva (2006), ( " Compatriots Arise " , " Dancing Sigidi in the Rain " ), Ojaide (1989), ( " No Prescription Cures A Country Nobody Loves " , " For My Love " , " Future Gods " ), Ofeimum (Soyinka 1975), ( " Resolve " , " We Must Learn Again To Fly " ), Aiyejina (Solanke 2005), ( " And So It Came To Pass " ) and Solanke (2008), ( " We are " ). This paper sees this generation of poets, after the 1960 Nigerian independence, as chastisers, visionaries, inspirers and prophets of change in the country's political and sociological landscape. ...
... The assertion is, " Yet we must learn again to fly. " 58, vol.5, no.10, June 2013 Building on this theme, the same Ofeimum (Soyinka 1975) in " Resolve... " , a nine-line poem, encourages the nation to make up its mind to forgive itself and its different recalcitrant and betraying parts – humans or otherwise. In this might come forgiveness of wrongs done and the healing of the national psyche. ...
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Solanke is a lecturer of Oral Literature and African Literature at the Department of English, Faculty of Humanities, Ajayi Crowther University. His works are basically concentrated on extricating and encouraging the hidden tendency of humankind to correct social ills through intrinsic embedded goodness in pursuit of an egalitarian society where all will be free and independent. His teaching fields encompass African Prose, Poetry and Drama, Creative Writing, General Oral Literature and African Oral Literature. Abstract For more than half a century, the Nigerian socio-political landscape had been occupied by military adventurists and aberrant politicians – both betrayers of the nation. The people and the country have, therefore, been on the receiving end of different uncaring governments. The onus to call these rulers and sometimes, even the ruled, to order has most times fallen on the Nigerian artistes, -a major part of who are poets. These set of writers have, for the period under review, been recorders, critics and way-showers to all involved in the development of Nigeria. This paper avers that the Nigerian poet has also gone a step further by not just writing and complaining but by also proffering ways out of the imbroglio the country has been enmeshed in by its near inept leadership. Through the various poems examined in this paper, Nigerian poets have proved to be visionaries and inspirers for the citizenry who dream of a better country.
... The fourth generation of African poets usually consolidate on the current and contemporary problems militating against Africa. My intention in this work is to apply the sociological approach to the study of selected poems in Poems of Black Africa, which was edited by Wole Soyinka (1999). I would make attempt to follow the classification of themes as Soyinka rightly put them. ...
... African poetry has expressed many concerns which make them unique to the understanding of African ethos and traditions. Commenting on these various voices in African poetry, Soyinka (1999) asserts that these poems "embrace most of the experience of the African worldmodern and historicthough naturally no claim is made here for an unattainable comprehensiveness of themes; or for their mutual exclusiveness. The overlapping is obvious and frequent. ...
... The voices in African poetry according to Soyinka (1999) encapsulate history and reality. While some poetry scrambles for self assertion, others struggle for identity. ...
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(Venets: The Belogradchik Journal for Local History, Cultural Heritage and Folk Studies) The paper examines the various voices in African poetry. African poets use their themes as echoes to salvage various inherences found in the decaying political, economic and social landscape. The paper argues textually the cultural ethos and the contemporary post-independence disillusionment on the African psyche as a result of colonilization. Using the meta-critical approach combined with realism, within sociological approach, the research calls for a concerted effort to stimulate originality and harness the benefits of globalization for the development of humanity in Africa.
... Commenting on these multiple voices characteristic of African poetry, Soyinka (1999) asserts that these poems embrace most of the experiences of the African worldview, modern and historic, though naturally no claim is made here for an unattainable comprehensiveness of their themes or their mutual exclusiveness. The multiplicity of the voices in African poetry, according to Soyinka (1999), encapsulates the historical reality. ...
... Commenting on these multiple voices characteristic of African poetry, Soyinka (1999) asserts that these poems embrace most of the experiences of the African worldview, modern and historic, though naturally no claim is made here for an unattainable comprehensiveness of their themes or their mutual exclusiveness. The multiplicity of the voices in African poetry, according to Soyinka (1999), encapsulates the historical reality. While some poetry appears to scramble for self-assertion, others reflect a struggle for identity. ...
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Poetry is the most basic and profuse form of emotive expression in Africa. The African manifests feelings through an outburst of song or poem when he loves and when he hates, when he works and when he plays, when he is in peace and when he fights, when the child is born and when death takes its toll. Poetry should be understood as a part of ongoing sets of aesthetic traditions, acts of distinction, and values. These are recognizable genres of expression (in either the ways they actively align, reject, or refigure received traditions of use).This study is an analysis of thematic distribution and poetic features in isiZulu performance poetry and also seeks to explore its socio-linguistic impact in the society. An ethnographic methodological approach was employed in this study. Data collection involved use of interviews, voice recordings and observations of the performance sessions. This is informed by two complimentary theories that served as the theoretical framework. Firstly Bourne (2001) and Tolstoy’s (2001) expressive theory of arts was used as a background theory to provide benchmarks to the understanding of the main aim and appreciation of performance poetry. Secondly, the study used Hyme’s (1981) ethnopoetic theory, where ethnopoetics is concerned with composition in the course of performance. Ethnopoetics is the study of the ways that narratives are structured into “lines” and are thus poetic (Hymes, 1981). The findings demonstrate that most of the poems studied in this research dwelt much on the theme of love but without necessarily ignoring other issues such as women and child abuse, corruption and many other social ills. The researcher also discovered that isiZulu contemporary poetry employs unique linguistic elements in its expression of the diverse thematic issues. Code-mixing or code-switching and borrowing seem to be getting more attention in the composition of performance poems.
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This paper examines modernist aesthetics in modern African poetry. The aim of this undertaking is predicated on the background that modern African th poetry is a continuum of the 20 century European modernist literature. A study of this nature is significant because it critically hints on the origin of modern African poetry, its canonisation, and its future as a literary form. The study starts with an examination of the concepts of 'modern' and 'modernism', first as separate terminologies and then as interwoven concepts. The paper further examines the nature and form of modern African poetry and poses the questions of "what makes African poetry 'modern'?" and "is African poetry a continuum of European modernist poetry?" In answering these questions, this paper examines some forms of modernism in modern African poetry such as syntactic inversion and jugglery, fragmentation, vivid imagery/imagism, symbolism, and allusiveness. Selected poems by Soyinka, Okara, Clark, Okigbo and Echeruo have been used for analysis. The study has shown that, truly, modernism exists as a concept in modern African poetry and its features have greatly influenced the modern shape of African poems.
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This paper examines the various canons of modern African poetry. It is predicated on the background that periodisation in African poetry has attracted arguments over the years. The study assesses some of these views on periodisation and harmonises them using representative works for analysis. The concepts of literary canon and modern African poetry are briefly highlighted before periodisation is considered. The study identifies eight broad canons of modern African poetry: pioneer poetry, modernist poetry, disillusionment poetry, civil war poetry, alter/native poetry, apartheid poetry, Niger delta/eco poetry and contemporary poetry, a recent tradition. The distinctive features of these traditions have been examined from the thematic and stylistic levels using representative works for analysis. It has been observed that every tradition possesses features that mark it out from other traditions. Findings also show that modern African poets fall into many canons because of the continuity of their writings and the fluidity of themes and techniques.
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Differential domestic debris management has implications on health security in cities. Within the last four decades, Ibadan retained the identity which attaches its space with dirtiness. This multi-sited comparative ethnography employed qualitative anthropological methods such as participant observation, in-depth and key informant interviews as data collection tools, using rational choice model as explanatory framework to unravel covert factors responsible for the protracted dirty identity. Manifest and latent health risks due to differential debris management were unraveled. Ogunpa water channel constructed after the famous devastating flood (omiiyale) in the 1980s remains attractive for domestic wastes disposal. Ethnographic data reflects disparity in private and public wastes management efforts across high, middle and low income residential areas. Study recommends balanced waste management policy execution across board in cities. Persistent poor wastes management due to rational choices, poor urban policy and lack of proper public environmental health education, resulting to unwholesome health problems in Ibadan, makes attainment of community health security a mirage.
Chapter
canadian poetry;traditions;artistic problems;humanism;world war
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