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Effect of a dance therapy workshop on social participation and integration of adults with motor deficits: An exploratory study

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  • Lethbridge-Layton-Mackay Rehabilitation Centre
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... There were 4 pre-post studies with no control group [33,34,35,36], 3 case reports [37,38,39], and 2 controlled studies [40,41]. The results of 5 of these studies were published as full articles in academic journals [33,36,37,39,40], 3 studies were published as abstracts in academic journals [34,35,41], and 1 study was a published as a graduate thesis [38]. ...
... There were 4 pre-post studies with no control group [33,34,35,36], 3 case reports [37,38,39], and 2 controlled studies [40,41]. The results of 5 of these studies were published as full articles in academic journals [33,36,37,39,40], 3 studies were published as abstracts in academic journals [34,35,41], and 1 study was a published as a graduate thesis [38]. The authors of the 3 studies published as abstracts were contacted to request further information and to determine if there was a full article submitted or in press. ...
... The authors of the 3 studies published as abstracts were contacted to request further information and to determine if there was a full article submitted or in press. Only one author replied with details about the study population and provided an updated sample size; however, no further published results were available at the time [34]. Table 2 lists the included studies and Records excluded (n = 13); intervention not solely dance (n = 1); no balance or gait measure (n = 2); part of larger study (n = 10) ...
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Purpose To conduct a systematic review that examined the effect of dance interventions on balance, gait and functional mobility outcomes in adults with neurological conditions other than Parkinson's disease. Methods A systematic search of relevant databases was conducted. Data extraction and methodological appraisal were performed by two independent authors. Results Nine studies were included (4 pre-post studies with no control group, 3 case reports, and 2 controlled studies) and results of the methodological quality assessment ranged from poor to good. Study groups included stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and Huntington's disease. Dance interventions varied in frequency, type and duration, and only 1 study reported intensity. Study dropout rates ranged from 20–44%, and 88–100% of dance classes were attended. Only 3 studies mentioned adverse events, of which there were none. A summary of results revealed significant changes in spatiotemporal gait parameters, Berg Balance Scale scores, Timed Up and Go test and six-minute walk test that were similar to or greater than those previously reported in a review of dance for individuals with Parkinson's disease. Conclusions There is emerging evidence to support the use of dance as a feasible intervention for adults with neurological conditions. Further investigation of the effects of dance with randomized controlled trials using larger sample sizes and better reporting of the intervention, participant tolerance, and adverse events is warranted.
... Many kinds of dance such as jazz, merengue, tango, rumba, salsa, Ballet are reported for dance therapy [34][35][36][37]. For the therapeutic application of dance, dance therapy, free and guided dance movement, and dance movement were used as terms [38][39][40]. Time/duration was described as both the length of the dance class and the length of the intervention period [20]. Range of each dance classed ranged from 45 to 120 minutes, and the median dance class duration was 90 minutes [36,20]. ...
... Dynamic Gait Index, Walking Scale and a timed 25-foot walk test [37,42]. Functional mobility was tested by Timed up a Go test [34,37,38,42]. Six-minute walk test, Six-minute wheeled distance, and Minimal Record of Disability (MRD) [26,34,39]. ...
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Dance is basically a complex physical activity which either casually or formally organized in which people take part for fitness, health and well-being, social relationships or competition and a worldwide human activity that involves complex whole body movements through space synchronized to music. Dance-related reviews of evidence have examined the effectiveness of dance therapy on psychological and physical health and well-being outcomes in patients with cancer, for schizophrenia, and on depression. Dance therapy was officially described firstly in 1948. The medical application of dance therapy was well reviewed in neurologic conditions. Dance has been used extensively for the treatment of gait and balance dysfunction in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Especially, Argentine tango is the most frequently employed dance form in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Tango therapy may hold promise as an intervention to improve gait, balance, and mobility in a variety of neurological conditions. Tango therapy was approached from dance therapy to the current status of medical application. A more systemic analysis of tango movement for proper and effective therapeutic application of tango is necessary for medical purposes.
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Assessments of the occurrence of falls in elderly populations reported an increased risk when barefoot as compared to shod conditions, suggesting that footwear has an effect on the postural control system. However, the results of studies analysing static stability in laboratory tests by evaluating the centre of pressure (COP) excursion are inconsistent. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of footwear on the postural control system by quantitatively assessing the postural movements executed during quiet stance. The postural movements of 29 subjects were recorded using a standard marker-based motion analysis system. Three footwear conditions were tested: barefoot, a casual athletic shoe and so-called unstable shoes. One-dimensional (1D) principal movement (PM) components were determined by performing a principal component analysis (PCA) on the posture vectors consisting of the 3D coordinates of all markers. The relative contribution of the first five PMs to the entire postural movement, their range of motion and their persistence (detrended fluctuation analysis, DFA) were determined. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed significant differences between all three shoe conditions. Specifically, when standing in unstable as compared to the normal shoes it was found that higher-order principal components contributed less to the entire movement, that the range of motion in all five PMs was substantially increased, and that the persistence was higher in the first two PMs. When comparing barefoot to normal shoes, it was found that in barefoot standing higher-order principal components contributed less to the entire movement and the persistence was increased in the first and decreased in the third principal component. These results demonstrate that a direct analysis of postural movements reveals additional information about the effect of footwear that is not available from COP measurements.
Article
Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.
Article
Inactivity or the under-utilization of lower limb muscles can lead to strength and functional deficits and potential injury. Traditional shoes with stability and support features can overprotect the foot and potentially contribute to the deterioration of the smaller extrinsic foot muscles. Healthy subjects (n=28) stood in an unstable MBT (Masai Barefoot Technology) shoe during their work day for a 6-week accommodation period. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine (i) if unstable shoe wear increased electromyographic (EMG) activity of selected extrinsic foot muscles and increased postural sway compared to standing barefoot and in a stable control shoe and (ii) if postural sway and muscle activity across footwear conditions differed between a pre- and post-accommodation testing visit. Using an EMG circumferential linear array, it was shown that standing in the unstable shoe increased activity of the flexor digitorum longus, peroneal (PR) and anterior compartment (AC) muscles of the lower leg. No activity differences for the larger soleus (SOL) were identified between the stable and unstable shoe conditions. Postural sway was greater while standing in the unstable shoe compared to barefoot and the stable control shoe. These findings suggest that standing in the unstable MBT shoe effectively activates selected extrinsic foot muscles and could have implications for strengthening and conditioning these muscles. Postural sway while standing in the unstable MBT shoe also decreased over the 6-week accommodation period.
Article
The Masai barefoot technology is used as a treatment option within the field of physical therapy to treat leg, back or foot problems. No information, however, is available on how Masai barefoot technology changes gait or muscle activity. Twelve healthy subjects underwent 3D gait analysis with simultaneously collecting surface electromyography data of the leg muscles when walking with regular shoes and with Masai barefoot technology-shoes. Before data collection, subjects were trained in Masai barefoot technology. A within-subjects study-design compared walking with regular shoes and Masai barefoot technology. With Masai barefoot technology, subjects walked slower with smaller steps. Movement pattern at the ankle showed major changes with increased dorsiflexion angle at initial contact followed by a continuous plantarflexion movement until terminal stance phase. With changed kinematics, alterations in the activity of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles could be observed. Smaller differences in movement and muscle activity were seen at knee and hip level. Masai barefoot technology has never been documented in detail concerning changes in movement pattern or muscle activity. This study showed that Masai barefoot technology changes movement patterns, especially at the ankle, and increases muscle activity. It may therefore be a useful training method for strengthening the muscle groups of the lower leg. Knee flexion and electromyographic characteristics around the knee joint are slightly increased and need to be considered in patients with knee problems. Our findings provide critical detailed information on changes compared to walking in regular shoes, but the clinical relevance of those changes remains to be determined.
Équilibre postural ; Plan frontal ; Hémiplégie ; Double pendule inversé ; Phase relative hanche-cheville Introduction.– Les patients hémiplégiques présentent un équilibre plus instable dans le plan frontal
  • Mots Clés
Mots clés : Équilibre postural ; Plan frontal ; Hémiplégie ; Double pendule inversé ; Phase relative hanche-cheville Introduction.– Les patients hémiplégiques présentent un équilibre plus instable dans le plan frontal. Cette étude cherche à analyser le comportement angulaire de hanche et de cheville des hémiplégiques dans le plan frontal lors d'un