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Carnivory in Solaropsis aff. fairchildi (Gastropoda,Solaropsidae)

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A specimen of Solaropsis aff. fairchildi was collected at Tupaciguara, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, on march 2010. In captivity only fresh meat was consumed, although foods of animal and vegetable food have also been offered.
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Resumo
Introduction
Carnivory in Solaropsis aff. fairchildi (Gastropoda, Solaropsidae)
Luciano E. Oliveira1
Abstract
1PPG em Ecologia e Conservação dos Recursos Naturais.
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia
CEP 38400-902. Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brasil
Email: luc.deoliveira@gmail.com
The genus Solaropsis Beck, 1837 has undergone by taxonomic changes for a long time and the systematic
confusion was probably due to the lack of information on the anatomies of the different species and the
tradition of describing new species based only on shell characters (Cuezzo, 2002). Solaropsis is present
from Costa Rica to northeastern Argentina and from western Colombia to Guyana and it’s a characteristic
inhabitant of rain forest regions, being more abundant in eastern South America, especially in Guyana,
Strombus 17(1-2): 12-13, Jan-dez. 2010
www.conchasbrasil.org.br/strombus/
Copyright © 2010 Conquiliologistas do Brasil
ISSN 1415-2827 (print edition)
ISSN 1983-2214 (online edition)
Strombus
12
A specimen of Solaropsis aff. fairchildi was collected at Tupaciguara, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, on march
2010. In captivity only fresh meat was consumed, although foods of animal and vegetable food have also been
offered.
Um espécime de Solaropsis aff. fairchildi foi coletado em Tupaciguara, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil, em
março de 2010. Em cativeiro apenas carne fresca foi consumida, embora alimentos de origem animal e
vegetal também tenham sido oferecidos.
Scientic Note
Figs 1-2. specimen of Solaropsis aff. fairchildi. 1, dorsal view on the move; 2, eating esh meat.
13
Carnivory in Solaropsis aff. fairchildi...
Strombus 17(1-2): 12-13, Jan-dez. 2010
Received: February 25, 2010. Accepted: November 25, 2010.
References
BARKER, G. M. & EFFORD, M. G. Predatory gastropods as natural enemies of terrestrial gastropods and
other invertebrates. In: Barker, G. M. (Org). Natural Enemies of Terrestrial Molluscs. CABI Publishing,
Wallingford, UK: , 2002, p.279-403.
CUEZZO, M. G. 2002. On Solaropsis Beck: New anatomical data and its systematic position within Helicoidea
(Pulmonata, Stylomatophora). Papeis avulsos de Zool., São Paulo 42(3): 31-46
CUEZZO, M. G. 2003. Phylogenetic analysis of the Camaenidae (Mollusca: Stylommatophora) with special
emphasis on the American taxa. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 138: 449-476.
SIMONE, L. R. L. 2006. Land and freshwater moluscs of Brazil. 1 ed. São Paulo: EBG. 390p.
Acknowledgments
I want to thank Dr. Carlo M. Cunha who encourage this publication and a anonymous review who sent me
comments and corrections.
Brazil and Bolivia (Cuezzo, 2003). Solaropsis fairchild Bequaert & Clench, 1938 is distributed at state of
Goiás and Minas Gerais, central Brazil (Simone, 2006:240) and data on their ecology are absent. Although
carnivory has been considered a feeding strategy in some terrestrial gastropods groups (e.g., Spiraxidae
and Streptaxidae) (Barker & Efford, 2002) this behavior never was observed to Solaropsis species.
One specimen of Solaropsis aff. fairchildi (Figure 1-2) (voucher MZUSP) was collected at a rock on a
riparian Forest off Tupaciguara (18°40’12”S, 48°30’47”W) near Uberabinha River (state of Minas Gerais)
in march 2010. The snail was kept by around 60 days at a styrofoam box (35 x 25 x 30 cm). In the rst
week were offered fruit and vegetables such as banana, pear, lettuce, tomato and the snail did not eat
anyone of them, however just chopped meat offered in the next weeks was accepted. Although the hunting
behavior of a live prey was not observed, this species shows clearly a carnivorous feeding behavior.
... The land snail genus Solaropsis Beck, 1837 (type species Helix pellisserpentis Gmelin, 1791) is distributed in Central and South America, from Costa Rica to Argentina (Cuezzo et al. 2018). Solaropsis species are known to inhabit trunks and branches of fallen trees, in litter (Cuezzo and Fernández 2001), but additional ecological information is lacking (Oliveira 2010). Currently, the genus Solaropsis has ~20 species in Brazil, ~9 of which are found in north Brazil (Salgado and Coelho 2003;Simone 2006;Salvador and Simone 2015;Cuezzo et al. 2018;Calcutt et al. 2020). ...
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An attempt to analyse the taxonomy of the genus Solaropsis, aiming to allocate a new species collected in Rio Cajari Extractive Reserve, Laranjal do Jari, Amapá State, Brazil, revealed that a nebula of uncertainties surrounds the genus, from the family level to the validity of several species. An initial taxonomic treatment is given for some taxa herein, resulting in modifications such as S. pellisserpentis (Gmelin, 1791) as an objective synonym of S. undata ([Lightfoot], 1786); and S. cicatricata (Beck, 1853) as the oldest name of the depression-bearing species. This taxonomic treatment is intended only to allow the description of the new species. Solaropsis caperata is, thus, introduced, having as its main distinguishing features the globose shell, strongly depressed half a whorl before the peristome, slightly convex whorls, large aperture and umbilicus, and cream colour with brown spots. http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:E3F92910-81EF-4632-94CC-BDD038023B78
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New anatomical data for three species of the genus Solaropsis Beck. 1837. isprovided. The descriptions were based on gross-morphological studies of the genital. pallial. digestive and nervous systems. Based on the present descriptions and the published anatomical information of different species of thegenus. their relationshipswithin theHelicoidea are discussed. Psadara Mil/er; 1878.aformerly describedsubgenus ofSolaropsis, later consideredas a different genus. is currently not considered a natural group. The results of this study support the idea that Solaropsis should be inc/uded within the Camaenidae.
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The monophyly of the land snail family Camaenidae has been in doubt due to a disjunct bihemispheric distributional pattern and to the lack of morphological synapomorphies. A cladistic analysis is presented using an ingroup composed of representatives of the three subfamilies distributed in Australia and 52 other species with American distribution. Bradybaenidae, Helicidae and Helminthoglyptidae were used as outgroups. Fifty morphological characters were treated as unordered and analysed using Pee-Wee ver. 2.9, a program for parsimony analysis using implied weights. The results of the analysis support Camaenidae as a monophyletic family (synapomorphies: oval genital orifice, absence of penial sheath). Two of the three Australasian subfamilies, Sinumeloninae and Camaeninae, are monophyletic in the strict consensus tree. The American taxa are classified in eight genera and arranged into two main clades. Caracolus is proposed as the sister group of the American Continental Camaenidae. The genus Solaropsis, previously excluded from this family by different authors, is reassigned to Camaenidae. Shell characters proved to be phylogenetically informative in defining Pleurodonte, Caracolus, Solaropsis, Isomeria and Labyrinthus. © 2003 The Linnean Society of London, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2003, 138, 449–476.
Cunha who encourage this publication and a anonymous review who sent me comments and corrections
  • I Want
  • Thank Dr
  • M Carlo
I want to thank Dr. Carlo M. Cunha who encourage this publication and a anonymous review who sent me comments and corrections.
Land and freshwater moluscs of Brazil. 1 ed. São Paulo: EBG. 390p. Acknowledgments I want to thank Dr. Carlo M. Cunha who encourage this publication and a anonymous review who sent me comments and corrections
  • L R L Simone
SIMONE, L. R. L. 2006. Land and freshwater moluscs of Brazil. 1 ed. São Paulo: EBG. 390p. Acknowledgments I want to thank Dr. Carlo M. Cunha who encourage this publication and a anonymous review who sent me comments and corrections.